FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Spanish Colonial Fortific... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good clean copy with no missing pages might be an ex library copy; may contain marginal notes and or highlighting
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Spanish Colonial Fortifications in North America 1565-1822 (Fortress) Paperback – 8 Apr 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£11.99
£4.70 £4.22
£11.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Spanish Colonial Fortifications in North America 1565-1822 (Fortress) + The Spanish Main 1493-1800 (Fortress) + The Spanish Galleon: 1530-1690 (New Vanguard)
Price For All Three: £33.48

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in Spanish Colonial Fortifications in North America 1565-1822 (Fortress) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (8 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846035074
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846035074
  • Product Dimensions: 18.5 x 0.6 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 831,548 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

In short, not only is the book extremely readable and well-researched, it's also inspiring....a rare but thrilling combination. --Muzzleloader

About the Author

Alejandro de Quesada is a Florida-based military history writer, an experienced researcher and collector of militaria, photos and documents and runs an archive and historical consulting for museums as well as for films as a secondary business with a strong Military History content. He has written over 100 articles and over 25 books, including several for Osprey, and is a leading authority on Latin-American subjects. Author of the following Osprey titles to date: "The Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection"; "The US Home Front 1941-45"; "Roosevelt's Rough Riders"; T"he Bay of Pigs;" "The Mexican Revolution"; "The United States Coast Guard during World War Two"; "Spanish Colonial Fortifications in North America."

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Squirr-El TOP 50 REVIEWER on 21 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback
From the Introduction -
"In North America (defined by the modern countries of Mexico, The United States, and Canada), the Spanish authorities began developing fortifications to protect new settlements, inland trade roads and seaports. Of interest is the adaptability of the Spanish in using local materials to construct their defences: in Florida where coquina was used to build the Castillo de San Marcos; the Gulf Regions where fired brick and stones were utilized; the Mississippi River regions of Louisiana, Arkansas, and Missouri where wood and earth were used; and the arid regions of the Southwest and California where adobe was the main construction material. This diversity in the construction of defences by the Spanish in North America is unique compared to those constructed in the Caribbean and in South America."

"The focus of this study is to look historically at the various styles of fortifications and defences built during Spain's presence in North America, from 1565 with the founding of St. Augustine to 1821 when Mexico gained independence from Spain. In addition, the work will examine the life of Spanish Garrisons within the different environments encountered in North America."

As you can see from the Contents below, the author has provided an introductory survey to the history and purpose of the Spanish fortifications in North America, which is well written and readable. There are also a number of superb reproductions of paintings, plans and drawings to support the plates and text of this extremely interesting volume, as well as numerous photographs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By JPS TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an interesting, somewhat original and often little-known topic to cover in an Osprey title. The author draws quite a lot on his previous publication on the history of Florida forts, and this partly explains largely both the structure and the contents of the book. These, and the forts in Louisiana to a lesser extent, make up two-third of the book. The presidios of New Spain, California and the North West, or rather what little is left of them, make up the rest.

One of the problems I had with this book is that it is essentially a list of fortifications of all sizes and types that is put together, with an over-detailed history provided for each of time or, on the contrary, very little information. In some cases, there are just a couple of lines for a very minor outpost. At others, there are a couple of pages for what turned out to be also a minor outpost, with the level of detail being such that even the names of the handful of soldiers garrisoning the little fort provided to the reader.

Essentially, this booklet is a catalogue, as opposed to the overviews that readers have come to expect from Osprey publications. It is also a rather heteroclite catalogue, since there seems to have been little in common in either design or purpose between the coastal defences and the presidios, apart from the rather obvious fact that both types were built to protect against Spain's enemies and control the territories were they were located.

What is often essentially lacking here is context. How did the fortifications in Florida fit in within the Spanish strategy in the Caribbean? What was their overall purpose? Why were they located in such and such a place?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
With Osprey Its Always Hit or Miss 29 April 2010
By Marco Antonio Abarca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When you purchase a book from Osprey, you never really know what you are going to get. Some of their books are really quite good, while others are terriblly amateur. It seems as though they are willing to publish just about anyone with a great passion for a subject. Unfortunately, having enthusiasm for a subject is not a guarantee that one will be a good writer. "Spanish Colonial Fortifications" is another example of Osprey's lack of quality control.

Alejandro Quesada's great passion is Spanish military history in Florida and the Carribean. This book is at its very best when Quesada is writing about the fortifications of Spanish Florida and the Gulf Coast. He knows his history and writes well about the subject. If Florida were my main interest, I would probably have given this book a better review. Unfortunately, my interest is in the Presidios of the Southwest. Many of his descriptions of these fortifications are only a few sentences in length. Spanish expansion into Northern Mexico and the American Southwest is not of much interest to Mr. Quesada. If this were not bad enough, Alejandro Quesada is poorly served by the washed out and often crimped illustrations of Stephen Walsh. In the final analysis, Alejandro Quesada would have been better off sticking to the subject he knows best. I bet he would have written a great book about the Spanish fortications of Florida. If you are interested in the Presidios of the American Southwest, look somewhere else.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
An extremely interesting volume 21 Feb. 2013
By Squirr-El - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
From the Introduction -
"In North America (defined by the modern countries of Mexico, The United States, and Canada), the Spanish authorities began developing fortifications to protect new settlements, inland trade roads and seaports. Of interest is the adaptability of the Spanish in using local materials to construct their defences: in Florida where coquina was used to build the Castillo de San Marcos; the Gulf Regions where fired brick and stones were utilized; the Mississippi River regions of Louisiana, Arkansas, and Missouri where wood and earth were used; and the arid regions of the Southwest and California where adobe was the main construction material. This diversity in the construction of defences by the Spanish in North America is unique compared to those constructed in the Caribbean and in South America."

"The focus of this study is to look historically at the various styles of fortifications and defences built during Spain's presence in North America, from 1565 with the founding of St. Augustine to 1821 when Mexico gained independence from Spain. In addition, the work will examine the life of Spanish Garrisons within the different environments encountered in North America."

As you can see from the Contents below, the author has provided an introductory survey to the history and purpose of the Spanish fortifications in North America, which is well written and readable. There are also a number of superb reproductions of paintings, plans and drawings to support the plates and text of this extremely interesting volume, as well as numerous photographs.

The Contents are -
P04: Introduction
P04: Florida
P21: West Florida and Pensacola Defences
P34: Louisiana Territory
P43: New Spain: The Presidios
P56: California and the Northwest
P61: Spanish Colonial Fort Sites Today
P63: Selected Bibliography
P64: Index

The Colour Plates are -
Map: European colonial claims in the Americas in the 18th century
A: City Defences of St. Augustine and Castillo de San Marco, Florida, 1805
This is an aerial ¾ view, showing a four-cornered `star' fort, and a moat-like defence work with a detached bastion.
B: Fort San Luis Florida, 1700
This is another aerial ¾ view, showing a four-cornered wooden palisade with dry moat, with bastions at each corner, enclosing a two story blockhouse with a palisaded roof.
C: 18th century Spanish defensive towers - 3 examples
This plate shows
(1) Mission Espiritu Santo, Texas - a side cut-away view into a bastion at the corner of a stone wall, with a cannon on the upper storey and a musketeer firing from an embrasure in the lower storey.
(2) Rancho de las Golondrinas, New Mexico - a rounded adobe tower set in an adobe wall, the second storey rising above the wall, with firing embrasures.
(3) Fort San Carlos, Missouri - a large round stone or brick tower of at least three storeys, with a palisaded roof and a cannon mounted on it. The ground floor is raised above the outside ground level and is entered by a wooden ladder / staircase. There is a large ditch containing musketeers extending each side of it.
D: Presidio La Bahia, Texas, 1767
This is another aerial ¾ view, showing a large square enclosure, walled with a mixture of wooden palisades and stone buildings.
Map: The major Spanish fortifications in North America, 1565-1823
E: Presidio de Tubac, 1755
This is another aerial ¾ view, showing a smaller single-storey oblong adobe brick-built structure, with wooden gates set in the two shorter sides and a square tower at one corner rising an extra storey, with a wooden palisaded roof.
F: Presidio Santa Barbara, 1785
This is another aerial ¾ view, showing a large enclosed space, surrounded by single-storey buildings, with one or two two-storey buildings, and an outer wall visible on two sides, enclosing gardens and paddocks.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
But Still A Nice Job 3 May 2010
By Kevin R. Young - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would have to agree with the above review; with Osprey you sometimes never know what you are going to get. I would have to agree, in some ways this work is somewhat disappointing, especially when it comes to more detailed information on the frontier presidios. That said, and understanding how the limitations often placed on the author due to the Osprey format, I still found this book creditable, and a good general overview of Spanish Colonial Fortifications. While heavy on Spanish Florida, which I still found of interest, I was happy to see St. Louis covered in some detail as well as my old stomping grounds of Presidio La Bahia. I do wish the author had mentioned that the current restoration there is more to the 1836 period than the Spanish and Mexican periods. Yes, while the illustrations are somewhat flat, they do have a nice representation of the differences in the fortifications. I guess you can not have Gary Zaboly or George Nelson do all of the historical art work.

Perhaps the author would have been best served if Osprey had allowed him to do one book just on Spanish Colonial Coastal Fortifications (including San Juan de Ulua) and then another on those inland. Certainly, those on the fronteir and the Presidio line could be their own seperate volume.

Bottom line is while some constructive criticism can be made, this is a nice overview of the subject and I am pleased that the author moved beyond Florida to survey the rest of the related sites. While it will certainly not replaced Max Moorhead's The Presidio or Lancers for the King, it does fill a niche. I would look forward to talking Spanish fortifications with the author anytime.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Overdetailed, superficial or both? 8 Sept. 2013
By JPS - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an interesting, somewhat original and often little-known topic to cover in an Osprey title. The author draws quite a lot on his previous publication on the history of Florida forts, and this partly explains largely both the structure and the contents of the book. These, and the forts in Louisiana to a lesser extent, make up two-third of the book. The presidios of New Spain, California and the North West, or rather what little is left of them, make up the rest.

One of the problems I had with this book is that it is essentially a list of fortifications of all sizes and types that is put together, with an over-detailed history provided for each of time or, on the contrary, very little information. In some cases, there are just a couple of lines for a very minor outpost. At others, there are a couple of pages for what turned out to be also a minor outpost, with the level of detail being such that even the names of the handful of soldiers garrisoning the little fort provided to the reader.

Essentially, this booklet is a catalogue, as opposed to the overviews that readers have come to expect from Osprey publications. It is also a rather heteroclite catalogue, since there seems to have been little in common in either design or purpose between the coastal defences and the presidios, apart from the rather obvious fact that both types were built to protect against Spain's enemies and control the territories were they were located.

What is often essentially lacking here is context. How did the fortifications in Florida fit in within the Spanish strategy in the Caribbean? What was their overall purpose? Why were they located in such and such a place? Were they defending some kind of frontier and marking the limits of Spanish Dominion or were they located at strategic spots (and why were these spots strategic?) Similar questions apply to the presidios of California and of New Spain. In both cases, bits and pieces of what could have made up the answers are scattered across the book, but there is no overall discussion. Was there in either case some kind of overall plan? For Florida as for the presidios, this does not seem to have been the case, at least not until the second half of the 18th century although the booklet is structured in such a way that I was left a bit unsure after finishing it.

I knew very little about Spanish Colonial Fortifications in North America before picking up this booklet, apart from a couple of things about San Augustine and Pensacola. I do not know very much more after having finished it, other than the general impression that it conveys. With a couple of exceptions (the two listed in the previous sentences in particular), these seem to have been small affairs, although their real importance in the struggles between the various European powers (Spanish, French and English) and then with the new United States is not clearly established in the book.

Three stars, since I was somewhat disappointed...
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Could have been better 29 Jun. 2010
By Historian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The other 2 reviews I agree with. There are some nice illustrations and artwork here, esp about Spanish forts I have never heard of. However, there should have been a map in the book showing the locations of ALL forts depicted in the book. Some illustrations of CA forts are for some reason placed in the section on FL forts. Sloppy editing.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback