Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Space Mavericks Paperback – Apr 1984


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£82.93 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Kable News Co (April 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0843921005
  • ISBN-13: 978-0843921007
  • Product Dimensions: 17.6 x 10.8 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,091,417 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Transporting valuable cargo between opposing galaxies. Fripp and Kahn ran afoul of interplanetary law, and found themselves playing cops and robbers as they shuttled desperately from one lost world to another, pursued by the space fleet of the vengeful police! Their only chance for survival lay on a desolate planet whose inhabitants had mysteriously disappeared, leaving behind traces of an advanced civilization - and the secret of regeneration, for anyone bold and clever enough to decipher it!

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By h3rne on 19 July 2006
Format: Paperback
I have very fond memories of this book and it's sequel "Children of the Night", as my first taste of space opera in my teens. Despite their flaws they remain amongst my favourite books.

Cards on the table; "The Space Mavericks" has a (perhaps deserved) reputation for being one of the most badly written books ever (trawl the SF discussion boards and you'll find it mentioned often in this context). And I have to agree there are some toe-curling moments. However, I'm as inclined to blame that on poor editing (of which this book seems to have had none) and amazingly, I'm going to recommend you read it anyway.

This book's great strengths are that it's crammed with interesting ideas and a believable space-trading background. Customs officials need bribing. Spaceships need maintenance. Space traders on shore leave make trouble, so spaceports are surrounded with a seedy strip. Cyberpunk before Gibson if you ask me.

Warp. The description of warp is by far the most interesting I've come across. It has more depth than the usual thinly disguised conceit that just allows FTL travel. It has properties and behaviour that have bearing on the plot. Criticisms on the grounds of "realism" are surely in themselves ludicrous.

Modification. This is an interesting Faustian deal, which I think Kring handles imaginatively. It does make the lead character Fripp Enos rather handy in a bust up, but then I like my heroes to be, well, heroes. And it's a long way from a carte blanche, especially when the ring starts to mess with its function in the second book.

The "magic" ring. Any advanced technology will accept the "magic" brand name from a less developed culture (what would _your_ grandparents have made of mobile phones?).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Castle on 4 Oct 2007
Format: Paperback
Dearest Michael, thanks for ruining my life. Now I will never know what happens to these generic two dimensional characters - the one with the fingernails and that other one - thanks to your failure to write the third book (after Children of the Night). This was my favourite scifi story ever as a child, because my Aunt bought it for me thinking it would be like Star Wars, but it had the word "BASTARD" in it so it was better. And yet I will never die a complete and happy person because of so called 'Michael Kring' AKA the Kringster. Thanks Kringster. You could probably have written the concluding book in about a day, to be fair. Why wouldn't you just finish the damned story? I like to think you were killed in some horrific writing-related accident. I mean, if not, then you are a very bad person. If you are still alive I will hunt you down and capture you, like in Misery, and make you write the third book. I will not flinch at busting up your ankles, Kringster. Not at all. Finish what you started. Damn you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mr. B. Godfrey on 9 Nov 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been looking for this book for years. The first sci fi book i ever read.

Its not a world class best seller. But still manages to set my imagination alight.

Forget about the spellings and the jumpy story line. its awesome!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I loved this book as a teenager. Lots of action and interesting ideas which could have been better contructed perhaps, but it's the creative ideas that really got me going. I bought the second one recently which really isn't as good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
In Defence of Poor Writing in SF 19 July 2006
By h3rne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have very fond memories of this book and it's sequel "Children of the Night", as my first taste of space opera in my teens. Despite their flaws they remain amongst my favourite books.

Cards on the table; "The Space Mavericks" has a (perhaps deserved) reputation for being one of the most badly written books ever (trawl the SF discussion boards and you'll find it mentioned often in this context). And I have to agree there are some toe-curling moments. However, I'm as inclined to blame that on poor editing (of which this book seems to have had none) and amazingly, I'm going to recommend you read it anyway.

This book's great strengths are that it's crammed with interesting ideas and a believable space-trading background. Customs officials need bribing. Spaceships need maintenance. Space traders on shore leave make trouble, so spaceports are surrounded with a seedy strip. Cyberpunk before Gibson if you ask me.

Warp. The description of warp is by far the most interesting I've come across. It has more depth than the usual thinly disguised conceit that just allows FTL travel. It has properties and behaviour that have bearing on the plot. Criticisms on the grounds of "realism" are surely in themselves ludicrous.

Modification. This is an interesting Faustian deal, which I think Kring handles imaginatively. It does make the lead character Fripp Enos rather handy in a bust up, but then I like my heroes to be, well, heroes. And it's a long way from a carte blanche, especially when the ring starts to mess with its function in the second book.

The "magic" ring. Any advanced technology will accept the "magic" brand name from a less developed culture (what would _your_ grandparents have made of mobile phones?). The discovery of a vanished advanced civilisation and all the obvious questions that raises, is the plot arc for the trilogy.

Perhaps this is the cut. This is SF - a literature primarily of ideas - and the ideas are why I love to read SF in the first place. Great writing doesn't guarantee good ideas. "An Enduring Love" and "Lolita" come to mind. Delicious prose undoubtedly, but I hated the books. If you are a "medium, not the message" advocate, don't touch this with an 11ft barge pole. If you can ignore the odd paragraph of duff descriptive prose then there's a lot of fun to be had with the underlying story and its accompanying ideas.

P.S. Nothing of the author has been heard since the early 1980s. Sporadic web searches continue to draw blanks but I for one would love to see the third book published.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Good and Fun Book 25 Aug 2003
By A. Vivolo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a fun book with an exciting read. It has a quick moving plot and a fun ending. Great for younger readers.
As for the nay sayer below: Hey, get a grip...its called SCIENCE FICTION!!! Things like traveling FTL and high tech fancy stuff are always without perfect explinations. That's why in real life those things haven't been built yet.....
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Slightly dated Sci-Fi, but worth a read. 26 Mar 1998
By M Hunter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Space Mavericks was written at the beginning of the 1980s and, in style of writing, is beginning to show its age. The book combines Warp engines and ancient 'magic', the overall feel reminds me of the classic "Out of the silent planet" by CS Lewis, but a bit darker with more than a couple of nasty fight scenes. The characters are not as developed as we expect from toady's books, this leaves them appearing a little shallow. However it's worth a read, there are a couple of nice sci-fi ideas. It's a shame the author didn't carry the series on, it would have been nice to see the characters developed further.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
When Sci Fi was simple - and fun. 17 Nov 2005
By Robert Lewis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Okay guys, so the plot is just that, pretty simple. The two characters, hero and sidekick, are just that. Like the other two reviewers say, this is just old style Sci Fi: No terrible angst, no bitter pasts, no fate of all the known worlds resting on your conscience, just a couple of guys caught up in something and taking the straightforward "beat up the bad guys" approach. And who the hell cares about the description of 'hyperspace'? For goodness sake - it's not real! As was said by A.V., if it was, we'd all be travelling to the stars. This book - and it's sequel - are there for the fun of it - something to divert you from the realities of a rainy day. It's not Shakespeare or Dickens, not Heinlein or Azimov, its just a moderate Sci Fi story. I read it many, many, years ago, found the sequel by accident and would really love to find the third book (if it ever existed). As the other guy said, put your brain on hold and enjoy some old style space opera.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A good science fiction adventure story 13 July 2014
By Underdog - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I bought this book many years ago when I was still young and could walk without pain. Those were the days before Amazon.com existed when I actually had to go to a book store to find something to read. You probably wouldn't believe me if I told you how many book stores I had to search through and the distance I had to travel to buy the second book in the series. I loved the book then and have read it again several times since. It is a very good science fiction adventure story. Sure, there are some problems with the book but it was never intended to be The Great American Novel. It was intended to be an entertaining science fiction adventure story and it was a successful effort when viewed in that light. Like most of the other reviewers, my only real complaint is that the third book was never published. I would love to see the full series available in the form of Amazon ebooks.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback