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The Space Between (Tribes of the Hakahei Book 1)
 
 

The Space Between (Tribes of the Hakahei Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Scott J. Robinson
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Aliens. They always attack when you least expect it. Although if we knew our history we would've expected these ones. But the truth about human history has been long forgotten, dismissed as mere myth and legend.

Not that Kim McLean really cares about the details. All she knows is that one minute she was wondering what a medieval hot dog might have been filled with, and the next she was beating aliens over the head with a mace. Now it's up to her alone to end this war. Well, just her, an elf, a crazy dwarf and a Wonderbra.

The Space Between is the first volume in a 4 book series (all of which are available). It draws on myths and legends of ancient Earth, weaving a tale that moves from Sherwood Forest to distant worlds and outer space. It involves, amongst other things, magical gateways, Area 51, Sherwood Forest, sentient spacecraft, a 50 thousand year old intergalactic war, Machu Picchu and strong coffee.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1007 KB
  • Print Length: 364 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00744AMGC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #471,188 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

I grew up in a small town (population 400) in Australia where the only entertainment was stuff you invented yourself. There were the usual stereotypical small town childhood things seen in nostalgic movies everywhere. My life generally revolved around the river (the Gwydir in this case) in one way or another. There were rafts and canoes. Camping. Bikes. And general hanging about. But to tell the truth, I didn't have a lot of friends so I spent a lot of time alone. And reading and writing are the perfect hobbies to do on your own.

I can't really remember reading a lot in the way of kids books. And I can't remember a time when I didn't read fantasy and science fiction (though it was mainly fantasy at that stage). There were a few, but I read Lord of the Rings for the first time when I was 11. Before that it was Eddings and Feist.

And there was never a time when I wasn't writing-- again, fantasy and science fiction with leanings towards the fantasy end of the scale.

If I could find the disks and find a Commodore 64 to run them I would have the first few pages of dozens of novels. I wrote them until I got a better idea, which was generally a couple of months later at most, when they would be dropped and forgotten. Even with my poor levels of commitment several of the novels were large enough to need several files as my overworked computer would run out of memory. Or I would draw intricate maps. Maps were always popular.

This continued-- with virtually no thought ever given to writing short stories-- until I was 19 years old. At that time i was living in a caravan park a few kilometres outside Canberra. There was even less to do there than in the small town of my childhood. So I decided to write a novel. And I decided that I would start writing the novel and not stop until I had finished. I also decided that I would forgo the huge, cast of thousands, epic fantasy pieces I had tended towards in the past and do something on a smaller scale. So each day I would sit in the steaming hot caravan or at the top of a slippery-dip in the caravan park's play area and write longhand in a wirebound notebook.

19 days later, The Book of Gon was finished. It was only about 35k words, but it was complete and gave me something to work with. Over the next two years I kept working and eventually sent a sample to Pan who was just getting into fantasy in a big way at the time with the publication of the first novels by Martin Middleton and Tony Shillitoe.

And the editors asked to see the complete manuscript. I'm not sure if I was surprised at the time, but if I'd known then what I know now I would have thought myself the king of the world (well before Leonardo DeCaprio claimed the crown).

It didn't go any further, of course but there you go. I still have the original notebook somewhere. And the novel is sitting on my hard disk at this very moment. It isn't terrible. It isn't great either. After that original version I did some changes with the structure making it a bit unusual (part is first person, part second person and part third person, all told out of order).

I have another couple of note books that hold the two parts of a series whose name I can't remember. The first book was completed and entered in the first ever George Turner Prize. Pan also read the entire manuscript for that one. Like the Book of Gon (horrible title-- 'Dramoon' and 'Queen of the Moon' were two other options thought up later) it isn't terrible, well not that I remember and, shows a lot of things that I still use in my current writing. Most obviously, a desire to twist conventions while not actually breaking them. (The first book in the series is actually called The Twist which references several areas in addition to the one mentioned.) Or maybe a desire to see conventions from a different angle.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book 13 May 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I loved this book. Fantasy worlds and contemporary science are blended in a way that just works amazingly well. This isn't set in a world combining both, it is a story of the two different types of worlds meeting. People, of various types, travel through gateways between their own worlds and others that are very different. Throw in a some hints of science well beyond our own and you have a brilliant mix.

All that wouldn't work without believable characters though, and this book doesn't disapoint. The primary viewpoints are those of a dwarf, an elf, a contemporary human and a... well, a character that doesn't really fit into any of the fantasy stereotypes. The elf and the dwarf are far from fantasy cutouts though. While many of the standard traits are in evidence, the reasoning behind some of them is unusual and well thought through, and other traits they show are a real surprise.

This book is highly recommended. Give it a try.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ambitious: yes. Too ambitious. But good. 19 Jun 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I am very reluctant to say it ... but I feel some of the other reviews have been published by well-meaning friends and/or associates of the author the way they seem to be familiar with his work and heave praise upon The Space Between (Tribes of the Hakahei #1).

This first volume of a trilogy is most certainly a 'very ambitious' book, as they all say. I do agree, but I feel it's way too ambitious. Though the author shows a lot of promise, he tries to throw everything into his first(?) novel, and I mean EVERYthing: Sherwood Forest, Area 51, military SF, magic, linguistics, humour, lost civilizations to name just some and then half a dozen different fantasy 'races' on top.

Reading it I was reminded of a talk I had with Jack Chalker at the SF world con in Holland, where he told me that he had to invent a huge number of complete religions for his next novel (The Ninety Trillion Fausts (The Quintara marathon)) and though I was and am a fan of Chalker's writing (specifically 'The Well of Souls' series) - and btw I strongly suspect Scott J. Robinson is as well - I cringed a bit and eventually said novel was met with very mixed reviews indeed.

What Robinson does, he does quite well on the other hand: Elves, dwarves, humans etc. really behave and think differently. The portrait of Area 51 is accurate - just kidding: it feels credible, and the description of specific stones underground is particularly well done. The humour - limited to Keeble, the dwarf - is actually very nicely handled: never heavy handed, but actually 'smart funny', sometimes subtle, sometimes deft.
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5.0 out of 5 stars No Room For Doubt 20 Jun 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
First, I am not a sock puppet although, apparently, someone has recently accused Scott's reviewers of being sock puppets. You can see many reviews I have previously written for Amazon for a wide range of products, but mainly books and music.

The first novel in the series asked so many questions related such diverse humanoid races as Trolls, Elves, Dwarves and humans that I just had to read the sequels. I am not known to delving into the unknown when it comes to sf/fantasy as I have had my fingers burned on countless occasions by taking notice of other people. I loved Scott's take on the Anasazi and why matriarchal or patriarchal societies develop as they do. Being a fan of UFOs and gates between worlds meant he ticked so many boxes I just had to enjoy the book, and I did.

I normally write reviews for a Mensa newsletter, "So It Goes", and I highly recommended other members to get this book. At the time it was free but for the ebook price you can't go wrong. Buy this novel, read it, enjoy it then go for the others. I did and have not regreted it at all. I just can't wait for the last part to be sent out. Thankyou Scott, not all "greats" have a long established career behind them but I hope this may just be the start of one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very ambitious novel 15 Feb 2012
By Andy E
Format:Kindle Edition
It's very rare that I pick up a novel from a new author that is well written with good strong characters and a plot which just makes you want to keep turning the pages to see what happens next. I said in my title that this was an ambitious book and it is. The story ties together eight races spanning multiple worlds with different universes and the possibility of a cataclysmic event somewhere in the past. The author has the skill to make it work.

This story has a lot of elements that have been seen before but not in this context. There are Elves, dwarfs, trolls, humans, area 51, spaceships and Sherwood forest. But not necessarily in that order. Perhaps the most frightening character is a very self assured and forthright Australian back-packer who won't take any nonsense from anyone. She happens to be our heroine. What a terrifying thought.

The tale is set against a background of Earth and some linked planets coming under attack from an aggressive alien race. In addition to our heroine the story picks up a collection of aliens and fantasy characters along the way. The reasons behind the alien attack are slowly pieced together just in time for another even deadlier race to enter the arena just before the first book ends. It's more than enough to get you to want to read the second book!

This is the first book in a series of I think, four books. It is a good, fun read with some solid new ideas. I'm looking forward to the next volume.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  13 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Original and ambitious - a solid read. 6 Feb 2012
By Sean the Bookonaut - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The Space Between is a self published title by Queensland author Scott J. Robinson. It's Scott's first novel, though he has been writing for some time.

The cover quote from Jack Dann holds true there is some serious talent displayed in The Space Between, some very smooth writing.

It's an ambitious type of story for a first timer, here's the synopsis to give you an idea:

Synopsis:
----------
The story is set in the multiverse of Ananake and draws on myths and legends of ancient Earth, weaving a tale that moves from Sherwood Forest to distant worlds and outer space. It involves, amongst other things, magical gateways, Area 51, sentient spacecraft, a 50 thousand year old intergalactic war, elves and dwarves, wonder bras, Machu Picchu and strong coffee.
Kim thinks her day is going badly when her friend fails to meet her at Sherwood Forest. Then an annoying knight hits on her and she is stalked by an elf and a dwarf. But then the aliens attack and things really start to go down hill. Collecting strange companions along the way she finds herself in a race to stop the war with the aliens before things really get out of control.

Why is it ambitious?
------------------------
I think it's an ambitious task, because the author is playing with lots of genres, in this case fantasy and sci-fi with a little thriller and adventure/mystery thrown in. There's lots of good ideas in the story and I found it a little difficult to suspend my disbelief when it came to some elements of the story line. Some of the plot I found a little convenient, as if Robinson wanted to get all his great ideas in. It was, not surprising then, that the original ideas that Scott came up with were what really drew me into the story.

What I liked
---------------------
I absolutely loved the character Keeble and Scott's take on Dwarven Culture. I could read an entire fantasy series with the ideas that he developed around the idea of Dwarven singing and rock working alone. Most fantasy dwarves are riffs off Tolkien, bearded, live underground and mine too deep. But Robinson gives us snippets in The Space Between, of a culture that has far more depth. The same can be said for the development of the character Tuki, a Moai. We get a fully developed original culture that I find refreshing. The most enjoyable parts of the novel for me were the ones that focussed on these two characters.

What I didn't
------------------------
I couldn't invest myself in Kim, the main character and the one from contemporary Earth. As a reader I just didn't connect. Mel the Elf was a bit the same, though she was an "aloof" elf, these characters had nowhere near the "meat" or interest of Tuki or Keeble.

Some of the humour seemed misplaced to me. There was some good one liners and pop culture references but I felt that this detracted from the story rather than added to it. If we are going to suspend our disbelief and accept the premise of this story I think it's better to go a more serious action adventure route.

Summing Up
------------------
I read a fair bit of self published stuff, enough to come across the dregs and to find some real gems too.

Scott displays solid writing, very smooth in parts, indeed it reminded me of Dr Who or Torchwood novelizations - you accept the premise (which might be a stretch i.e. Torchwood defending humanity from alien incursions sans all help from other nations) whole heartedly and then take the events and characters seriously.

I think this one is worth a look, if you are interested in something a little different than straight fantasy or Sci-Fi - a solid start.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Space Between 12 Feb 2012
By MozleyHayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I started reviewing books hoping to find the next great sci-fi novel written by an undiscovered writer who would go on to be the next Peter F. Hamilton or maybe even...Isaac Asimov...*sighs, looking into the distance*.

Unfortunately what you do find is a lot of weekend writers churning out derivative stories that always seem to end with "and it turned out she was a robot". If it's sci-fi it's always lasers, if its fantasy it's always dwarfs and elves with names like Thuyl'erngorn, son of R'dirnegt.

So I started reading The Space Between with the same trepidation. And I have to say the more I read, the more I loved it. The characters, the pacing, the writing, the plot, it was all so good. Where a lot of the sci-fi I have read and reviewed recently follow a very linear plot, following a specific formula, The Space Between felt fresh and new.

The story is set in the multiverse of Ananake and draws on myths and legends of ancient Earth, weaving a tale that moves from Sherwood Forest to distant worlds and outer space. It involves, amongst other things, magical gateways, Area 51, sentient spacecraft, a 50 thousand year old intergalactic war, elves and dwarves, wonder bras, Machu Picchu and strong coffee.

Kim thinks her day is going badly when her friend fails to meet her at Sherwood Forest. Then an annoying knight hits on her and she is stalked by an elf and a dwarf. But then the aliens attack and things really start to go downhill. Collecting strange companions along the way she finds herself in a race to stop the war with the aliens before things really get out of control.

It is a great mix between Earth mythology and science fiction and it manages to feel believable and magical at the same time, which is combination that sucks you into the story. He takes the familiar (Area 51 for example), colours it in his own way and expertly weaves it all into a page turning story.

There are elements which will be familiar to all fantasy and sci-fi fans; the grumpy dwarf and aloof elf. It's just when we think we have these characters figured out that we see that we were wrong all along, and though where Scott takes us is completely different to what we have read before, it feels familiar and right.

I won't say that it's all positive though, very few books are (apart from Dune and anything by Wyndham). There are some parts where you have to suspend your disbelief in the plot to enjoy the story, but the raw talent is there for the right publisher and editor.

It may be me, it may be that this is just the kind of book I love, but I believe that this has something for every Sci-fi fan whilst managing to create a niche of it's own.

I've spoken to Scott and he said that book 2 will be available in a few months and will be made available to people who donate through his website here: [...] I for one can't wait for the next instalment.

A very strong 4.5/5 for The Space Between.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic mix 17 Mar 2012
By Forest L. Bell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I've read this one and the next two in the series and Scott does a wonderful job of mixing story elements. The story combines pure fantasy and pure science fiction in a way that really fits together. I'm anxiously waiting for the next book in the series!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book 13 May 2014
By Simon Goodson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I loved this book. Fantasy worlds and contemporary science are blended in a way that just works amazingly well. This isn't set in a world combining both, it is a story of the two different types of worlds meeting. People, of various types, travel through gateways between their own worlds and others that are very different. Throw in a some hints of science well beyond our own and you have a brilliant mix.

All that wouldn't work without believable characters though, and this book doesn't disapoint. The primary viewpoints are those of a dwarf, an elf, a contemporary human and a... well, a character that doesn't really fit into any of the fantasy stereotypes. The elf and the dwarf are far from fantasy cutouts though. While many of the standard traits are in evidence, the reasoning behind some of them is unusual and well thought through, and other traits they show are a real surprise.

This book is highly recommended. Give it a try.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Interesting story. Great promise for the series. 14 Feb 2012
By James A. Jackson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
An interesting story that has a decent flow to it. I have to agree with Sean, in that the scope of the story is quite ambitious, but I feel managed well. I enjoyed the intermix of fantasy, and sci-fi with characters that came to life as the pages flew by. Scott could be onto something with this series, time will tell.
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