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Southern Frontiers: A Journey Across The Roman Empire Hardcover – 4 Mar 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape (4 Mar 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224087088
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224087087
  • Product Dimensions: 35.6 x 3.3 x 29.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 551,766 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

`strange and powerful imagery' -- Harpar's Bazaar

`an evocative journey through the remnants of the Roman Empire' --Lonely Planet Magazine

'The result is breathtaking. Who else could photograph ruins and give them such brooding drama' --Traveller

a work of art... photos of great majesty, awesome in their technical mastery
-- The Lady

Book Description

An expansive photographic journey across the ruins and landscapes of the boundaries of the Roman Empire

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Barton Keyes on 3 Mar 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those who are familiar with Don McCullin only through the current exhibition at the Imperial War Museum at Manchester and his previous reportage collections, this book will be a revelation.

It is a truly beautiful book -- a masterpiece of photo- and book-printing.

The photographs are darkly moody -- even what you can presume are the "sunny" ones. The overall effect is twofold -- a sense of unbearable sadness at the passage of a great civilization, now left only in stumps of ruins scattered across thousands of miles; and an immediate sense of longing to go and see what McCullin has seen --even though it is impossible for most of us to see exactly what McCullin has seen in composing and then printing these beautiful images.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Svalbaard on 31 Mar 2010
Format: Hardcover
Unfortunately I feel that most (if not all) photography books these days are both pointless and irrelevant - seemingly caught up far too much in their own self worth; Martin Parr for example, I just don't understand the relevance of his work. This though, from Don MCcullin really is a work of art from a true photojournalist and photographer that has been into the heart of darkness and back several times, and has only just lived to tell the tales. As a previous commentard has suggested, you need to give this piece of work time to breathe, and a slow review to really process the quality of the pictures within. After reading Mr McCullins biography, and having found the final chapters particularly poignant it is gladdening to find that he has found his feet once more, and that he is still producing beautiful work that stands head and shoulders above a quaqmire of irrelevant and meaningless dross.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Camera5 on 4 Mar 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book stands out, especially in the contemporary landscape of so called 'art photography' as a true work of genius. This is brilliant, gutsy, tender, poetic photography. Great black and white prints and a deep immersion in the awe that McCullin felt for these places and their history. Don't flick through this book. Imagine you are opening a rare and very valuable bottle of wine. Wait for a quiet moment of the day and savour the magic on every page. The world needs more photography like this. This work is complex, haunting, thought provoking and profoundly beautiful.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ibraar 'Le Saracen' TOP 500 REVIEWER on 19 Feb 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Southern Frontiers of the Roman Empire.
It is a very large book, with large beautiful black and white plates, two introductions one being by McCullin himself - the rest is all photo, with captions.
I heard tell that McCullin used a Large Format camera with sheet film to capture these places, ranging from Palmyra to Baalbek and finishing off with desolate, bleak and soulful pictures of Hadrians Wall in winter - covered in snow they portray the Northern Frontier of Rome perfectly.
Don McCullin is a genius and also my most favorite of artists and this is another masterpiece, as it's not his usual portraiture, reportage, landscape or still life (as in open skies) but a record of a personal trip through the Southern Frontiers of the Roman Empire.
He captures what most photographers are never able to - the desolation, the beauty, the antiquity, the soul and spirit of the place - Leptus Magna in Black and White Large Format is something to behold - and with McCullins touch the feel of the place, the ghosts haunt every photograph and one is drawn into staring at the photo and losing oneself in thought.
Every single photograph is a masterpiece in itself, and just focussing upon them can lead one to rupture or melancholy - as both states are expressed and made manifest in the photographs.
And this book inspired me and kindled the dormant childhood interest in Rome i used to have and I long to visit Baalbek, Palmyra and Leptis Magna.
Having visited Caerleon and seen remains of the Amphitheatre there I photographed it in Black and White MF film, and having studied my own photographs I realise BW is a perfect medium to record history with, yet I know I have not the spirit of McCullin, nor ever will as his work is beyond.
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