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Sourcery: (Discworld Novel 5) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 21 Jun 2012

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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi (21 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552166634
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552166638
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 275,512 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Terry Pratchett was the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he was the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Sir Terry Pratchett died on 12th March 2015

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Review

"May well be considered his masterpiece... Humour such as his is an endangered species" (The Times)

"Pratchett is a comic genius" (Daily Express)

"One of the best and funniest English authors alive" (Independent)

"He would be amusing in any form and his spectacular inventiveness makes the Discworld series one of the perennial joys of modern fiction" (Mail on Sunday)

Book Description

The fifth Discworld novel, revamped for a new generation of readers...

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
As a big Rincewind fan, I count Sourcery as one of my favorite Pratchett novels. This fifth novel of Discworld is the first to have a real epic quality to it. Seeing as how the plot is hinged around the "Apocralypse" (even though an inebriated Pestilence, War, and Famine cannot remember the proper term for it), it pretty much has to be an epic. Ipslore was a natural-born wizard, the eight son of an eighth son, who did the unthinkable (not to mention unwizardly) act of marrying and having an eighth son of his own--a sourcerer. By tricking Death, he enters his own wizard staff and later guides the ten-year-old boy Coin in assuming the Archchancellorship of Unseen University and trying to take over the world. A sourcerer has free rein over the use of magic, unlike modern-day wizards who talk about magic but rarely perform it. Sourcerers almost destroyed the Discworld in ancient times in the Mage Wars, and young Coin sets in motion a modern-day Mage War that can only end in disaster. Only one man can stop the sourcerer and save the world--most unfortunately, that one man is the inept wizard Rincewind. His only allies are the wise and good Librarian (who happens to be an orangutan), the beautiful yet deadly thief Conina (daughter of Cohen the Barbarian), and Nigel, the skinniest hero on the Discworld whose only heroic wisdom comes from a ghost-written book by Cohen the aforementioned Barbarian. The Luggage also plays a part, but he/she/it is not there at Rincewind's side.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Sutherland on 25 Jun. 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant book in the best discworld tradition, funny clever and has a host of brilliant characters. It's the funniest discworld book i've read yet. The story is original and some of the ideas in the book are purely genius. The character conina is a great idea just when you thought you knew Cohen the barbarian you get Conina the barbarian hairdresser! The return of Rincewind put the icing on the cake, back and at his most amusing rincewind is a work of genius. This is a must read for all Discworld fans it's brill!!!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Sally-Anne on 17 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
A terrible thing has happened. Now it's become clear why wizards should remain celibate. One wilful wizard, Ipslore the Red, in defiance of tradition, marries and has children. Sons in fact. And his eighth son, Coin, is a sourcerer (the eighth son of an eighth son of an eighth son = a wizard squared = very powerful magic). But surely it's not that bad - it's not the end of the world, is it? Yes, it could be. The shade of Ipslore, through his sourcerer son, instigates wizard war. Hellish, apocalyptic events are set in motion. The four horsemen are abroad. The denizens of the dungeon dimension are struggling to rise. Ice giants are tearing across the plains. The gods are imprisoned. All that stands between the discworld and armageddon, is a spineless wizard, a barbarian (hairdresser wannabe), a grocer (barbarian wannabe) and a librarian ape. It doesn't look good. You shouldn't laugh ... but you will. And guess what. Rincewind, who is very well known for his complete lack of courage and over-developed instinct for self-preservation, does the most suicidally brave thing imaginable in an effort to save his beloved university library and the world.
It's another Pratchett gem. Doctors might consider prescribing these books instead of anti-depressants for some patients. They always work for me.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jane Aland VINE VOICE on 23 Jun. 2005
Format: Paperback
Having broadened his scope with Granny Weatherwax and Death in the last couple of books, Terry Pratchett returns to original lead character Rincewind for the 5th Discworld novel. Rincewind is even more inept and cowardly than ever before, but is still a hilarious and sympathetic character, and it's nice to see the return of his homicidal sentient luggage.
Looking back at the entire series of Discworld novels before embarking on a re-reading, Sourcery was the novel I remembered least about. It turns out to be for a good reason - this book has a very simple storyline: a sourcerer tries to take over the world, Rincewind has to stop him, the end. It's not a bad book, and there's plenty of great humour, but don't expect any intricate plotting with this instalment. Re-reading the series in order it becomes clear that this novel is an expansion of some of the ideas previously used in Equal Rites - in both stories the main plot focuses on a young powerful wizard arriving at the Unseen University and putting the world at danger by their meddling with powerful magic (though this was only briefly touched on in Equal Rites due to the novel concentrating on Esk's apprenticeship), and both novels feature inherited magical staffs that watch over their young owners and drive the plot.
Sourcery is a good novel for fans of the Librarian, as he gets a substantial role for the first time, while Lord Vetenari makes his first (named) appearance. The novel breaks out of the standard Ankh-Morpork setting for a mid-book excursion to Klatch, and the introduction of Cohen's daughter Conina and inept wannabe-barbarian Nijel.
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