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The Soul of Man under Socialism (Forgotten Books) Paperback – 16 Oct 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 54 pages
  • Publisher: Forgotten Books (16 Oct. 2008)
  • ISBN-10: 1606801600
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606801604
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 0.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,075,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and Magdalen College, Oxford where, a disciple of Pater, he founded an aesthetic cult. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd, and his two sons were born in 1885 and 1886.
His novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), and social comedies Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), established his reputation. In 1895, following his libel action against the Marquess of Queesberry, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment for homosexual conduct, as a result of which he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), and his confessional letter De Profundis (1905). On his release from prison in 1897 he lived in obscurity in Europe, and died in Paris in 1900.

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About the Author

Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and Magdalen College, Oxford where, a disciple of Pater, he founded an aesthetic cult. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd, and his two sons were born in 1885 and 1886. His novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), and social comedies Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), established his reputation. In 1895, following his libel action against the Marquess of Queesberry, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment for homosexual conduct, as a result of which he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), and his confessional letter De Profundis (1905). On his release from prison in 1897 he lived in obscurity in Europe, and died in Paris in 1900. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Lark TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Forget all the things which are commonly labelled socialist for a moment and consider why or what its appeal could possibly be and you are unlikely to come up with anything much different from what Oscar Wilde does in this brilliant, over looked, small book.

Wilde waxes lyrical on what he believes could be the result of a permanent relief of poverty, similar to William Morris, here is an uplifting account of a world of improved social obligations. Reasoning that a world without the sorts of obligations compelled by sympathy for others in chronic states of want or poverty would be one where a more profound, convivial, civilised and altogether more honest individualism prevails.

Entirely removed from concrete proposals for policy, personal choices or practices this account has a certain sort of timelessness and doesnt appear arcane, antiquated or dated like a lot of socialist books. It certainly is the ideology at its most romantic, smiley and would appeal to any post-eighties reader who's a libertarian, or even libertine, at heart.

I would recommend this to all readers, politically interested and not so politically interested alike, to anyone more or less hostile towards much maligned and misunderstood (not least by its dearest supporters) socialism. It is a story of sorts and it has more literary than political merit, infact it is to contemporary politics what Jules Verne is to contemporary world travellers, cavers or submariners.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By jim on 13 Dec. 2012
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Just. Read. It. Very short, profoundly enlightening and of course beautifully written, a wonderful book. Do not think for a second though that this is a political book, it looks at socialism through a moral filter as opposed to an economic one, but if anything this simply furthers the book's unique nature.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By L. E. Bosch on 11 Dec. 2012
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Oscar Wilde reminds us with absolute clarity, what it ought to mean to be truly human.
The passage of time since then has regrettably taken us even further away from this noble aspiration. How easily we allow ourselves to be waylaid. This really ought to be compulsory reading!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By arcalis on 13 Sept. 2012
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This has to be one of the most thought provoking and inspirational works around. Genius is thrown around too often these days but look for it in Oscar Wilde's work and you will not be disappointed. A simple, eloquent and stimulating read (short too), that i find myself re-reading and thinking about a year down the line. Go get it.
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By Partisan on 28 Mar. 2014
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Interesting to read with our knowledge of the reality of "socialism", although the Socialism that Wilde talks about is not something that ever has been or ever will be a reality - truly utopian.
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By Business student on 30 Dec. 2012
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This was an interesting read. Wilde puts forward many thought provoking ideas of how he believed man should and inevitability will be under socialism. Despite not agreeing with all of this book, it is free and short, and well worth the read.
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By Wildheart on 27 Aug. 2012
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What a strange read this was.

I really enjoyed reading this and am very much intrigued by Wilde and his mind.
This book contained, for me, some fascinating insights into that mind.

However, as a recent convert to the cause of "socialism," given what we've just gone through via the last few elections, particularly the most recent one, where the "radical," party I've admired and voted for, for over 30 years sold its soul down the river and has probably ensured its total destruction, I'm not sure that this gave me much of an insight into socialism itself.

Wilde seems to spend the greater part of the work banging on about what he considers to be "Art," in its truest and purest form and what is not.
Again, fascinating though this was, it didn't seem all that relevant to me.

However, I'd recommend this as a read.
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