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Sony a7 Full Frame Interchangeable Lens Camera Body Only - Black (24.3MP) 3 inch LCD

by Sony
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)


RRP: £1,299.99
Price: £1,142.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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  • Tough and compact, great for professional use. 24.3MP Exmor CMOS sensor, BIONZ X processor and fast hybrid autofocus
  • 24.3MP Full Frame Exmor CMOS sensor
  • Enhanced Fast Hybrid Autofocus system
  • BIONZ X image processing engine
There is a newer model of this item:
Sony A7R Full Frame Camera Body - Black (36.4MP, CMOS Sensor) Sony A7R Full Frame Camera Body - Black (36.4MP, CMOS Sensor) 4.5 out of 5 stars (6)
£1,581.91
In stock.

Frequently Bought Together

Sony a7 Full Frame Interchangeable Lens Camera Body Only - Black (24.3MP) 3 inch LCD + Sony SEL35F28Z E-mount Carl Zeiss Sonnar T Lens for 35mm Full-frame Cameras + Sony SEL55F18Z E-mount Carl Zeiss Full Frame Prime Lens
Price For All Three: £2,568.70

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Product details

  • Product Dimensions: 4.8 x 12.7 x 9.4 cm ; 417 g
  • Boxed-product Weight: 1.8 Kg
  • Delivery Destinations: Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
    Find out more about our Delivery Rates and Returns Policy
  • Batteries 1 Lithium ion batteries required. (included)
  • Item model number: ILCE7B.CE
  • ASIN: B00FWUDE9W
  • Date first available at Amazon.co.uk: 16 Oct 2013
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:
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Product Description

Product Description

At a glance

Compact size, full frame performance
Compact size, full frame performance
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Enhanced Fast Hybrid auto focus
Enhanced Fast Hybrid auto focus
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Capture almighty professional quality with a 24.3MP full-frame sensor

Shoot the scene exactly as you see it with Fast Hybrid Autofocus and a high resolution OLED viewfinder

Get the shot, from wide-angle 18mm to telephoto 70mm, when using the dust and moisture resistant SEL-1870 full-frame lens

Made for professionals with a sure grip, customisable controls, and dust and moisture resistant seals

Reproduce fine detail and textures in real time with the high speed BIONZ X processor

Step up to full-frame power

Switch lenses. Shoot almighty professional quality with 24.3MP. React with speed and accuracy thanks to Fast Hybrid Autofocus and a high resolution OLED viewfinder. Realise your creative vision anywhere with the world's smallest 35mm full-frame interchangeable-lens camera.*

Capture almighty professional quality with 24.3MP

With a 24.3-effective-megapixel 35mm full-frame Exmor CMOS sensor, the a7K really lets you express your creativity. Shoot beautiful defocus effects. Capture highly realistic detail, even in low-light. Ensure every shade and tone of your vision comes to life with a wide sensitivity range of ISO 100 to 25600 (which is further expandable down to 50 and up to 51200). The power of the full-frame sensor combines with the high speed BIONZ X image processing engine so that the scene is faithfully reproduced even when you're shooting with deep focus and a high pixel count. The a7K also comes with a compact and lightweight, full-frame standard zoom lens. Be ready for any scene, from wide-angle 18mm to telephoto 70mm. Capture blur-free results when shooting handheld or on the move with built-in image stabilisation. The dust and moisture resistant SEL-1870 full-frame lens is the ideal partner for the a7K.

Catch the moment in the blink of an eye

The a7K combines a full-frame sensor with high-speed, high-precision Fast Hybrid Autofocus. Lock-on to your subject fast. Shoot a continuous burst of images at 5fps. With a wide 25 point autofocus area for contrast-detection and 117 densely placed phase-detection AF points, you can track things even when they're moving fast. Together with the OLED Tru-Finder viewfinder, you can be sure to capture exactly what you see. Frame your subject in high contrast and high resolution across the full screen, even in a dimly lit scene. It's time to start reacting as one with your camera.

rich tonal gradations
Rich tonal gradations
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Pair with your smartphone
Pair with your smartphone
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Portable, professional handling in any situation

It may be the world's smallest 35mm full-frame interchangeable-lens camera* but it handles like a professional camera twice its size. Carefully placed customisable buttons and an intuitive control wheel easily let you adjust settings. The robust build of the camera - with dust and moisture resistant seals - and sure grip mean you're ready to take on any assignment. Start shooting safe in the knowledge that the a7K is designed to withstand the demands of professional use.

Share photos and movies instantly with Wi-Fi and NFC

Go anywhere, share anytime. Simply touch your a7K against an NFC-enabled smartphone or tablet to activate remote control camera apps or share photos or movies instantly for upload to social networks - no extra cables, no complicated connections.** Use the camera's built-in Wi-Fi*** for easy sharing or back-up with a range of devices including your smartphone, tablet, PC or TV.

Show detailed HD photos and Full HD movies

From an expressive photo to an atmospheric movie, the high image quality and defocusing power of the full-frame sensor open up a world of possibilities. Transfer a photo in seconds to a HD TV, via HDMI or Wi-Fi, and see every tiny detail on the big screen. The a7K also has a range of features for professional movie-making, from high performance audio recording, to Clear Image Zoom for close-ups with no loss of resolution. Shoot smooth 60p Full HD movies, or 24p for a classic movie feel.

Accessories

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Soft Carrying Case
LCE-LCA
Battery NP-FW50
A-mount Lens Adaptor LA-EA3
A-mount Lens Adaptor LA-EA4
Grip VG-C1EM
Flash HVL-F43M
Tripod VCT-VPR10
LCE-LCA NP-FW50 LA-EA3 LA-EA4 VG-C1EM HVL-F43M Product Details

* Information correct as of 16th October 2013 and refers to commercially available products intended for consumer use.

** Availability of apps depends on region. More apps will become available post-launch. PlayMemories Mobile needs to be downloaded onto the smartphone/tablet.

*** Only videos recorded in MP4 can be transferred to a smartphone/tablet.

Review


From dpreview.com:

If there's one thing that you can say about Sony's digital camera business, it's that they've experimented with many different concepts. From SLRs with dual autofocus systems and Translucent Mirror Technology to its NEX mirrorless line-up, Sony has gone down virtually every avenue in digital imaging. Its latest products - the Alpha 7 and Alpha 7R - may be the most exciting products to come out of the Sony labs in some time. The company has managed to create full-frame cameras which are about the same size as the Olympus OM-D E-M1. In other words, the Alpha 7s are much smaller than their full-frame interchangeable lens peers (such as Nikon's D610 and the Canon EOS 6D), an achievement made possible primarily because they're not SLRs.

In addition, Sony is also unifying the Alpha and NEX brands, so all future interchangeable lens cameras will now fall under the Alpha umbrella. Being mirrorless, the a7 would have otherwise likely been prefixed with the letters NEX.

The a7 and a7R are identical in terms of physical design, with the main differences being the sensor and autofocus system. The a7 features a full-frame 24 megapixel CMOS, while the a7R has a 36 megapixel CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter. The a7 uses a Hybrid AF system (with on-chip phase detection) similar to the one found on the NEX-6, while the a7R has traditional contrast detection. The a7 is also capable of electronic first curtain mode, which allows for a quieter shutter, and reduces the potential for 'shutter shock' vibration; this is absent from the A7R. Both cameras use Sony's latest Bionz X processor and also have XGA electronic viewfinders, tilting LCDs, Wi-Fi, and weatherproof bodies that resemble that of the Olympus E-M1.

As you'd expect, Sony had to come up with new lenses to take advantage of the full-frame sensors, and they'll be known as 'FE-series'. Five lenses were announced to start with (listed below), with ten more promised by 2015. Existing E-mount lenses will work, though the image will (necessarily) be cropped. If you have A-mount lenses laying around, those too will work, as long as you pick up either of Sony's full-frame-ready adapters (the LA-EA3 or LA-EA4).

Sony a7 key features
  •     24.3 megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor with OLPF
  •     E-mount with support for FE, E, and A-mount lenses (with adapter)
  •     Bionz X image processor
  •     Hybrid AF system with 25 contrast-detect and 117 phase-detect points
  •     Weather-proof alloy and composite body
  •     Multi-Interface Shoe
  •     3-inch tilting LCD with 1.23 million dots (640x480, RGBW) XGA (1024x768) electronic viewfinder
  •     Diffraction correction technology
  •     Full HD video recording at 1080/60p and 24p; uncompressed HDMI output
  •     Wi-Fi with NFC capability and downloadable apps


The a7 uses a 24.3 megapixel CMOS sensor with a low-pass filter and on-chip phase detection. This 'Hybrid AF' is supposed to result in speedier AF, supporting the camera's ability to shoot at 5 fps with continuous autofocus. The more expensive a7R, on the other hand, has a 36 megapixel sensor with no optical low-pass filter and a more conventional contrast-detect AF system.

Both the a7 and a7R can record video at 1080/60p and 24p, with manual exposure control, headphone and mic ports, an audio meter, zebra pattern, XLR support (via adapter), and live, uncompressed HDMI output.
Bionz X Processor

The company's latest processor, dubbed Bionz X for reasons that presumably made sense to someone, is considerably more powerful than the previous generation, allowing what the company says is more sophisticated processing.

Sony is being a little vague on specifics but is touting the new processor as offering 'Detail Reproduction Technology' which appears to be a more subtle and sophisticated sharpening system. The company promises less apparent emphasis on edges, giving a more convincing representation of fine detail'.

Another function promised by the Bionz X processor is 'Diffraction Reduction', in which the camera's processing attempts to correct for the softness caused by diffraction as you stop a lens' aperture down. This processing is presumably aperture-dependent and sounds similar to an element of Fujifilm's Lens Modulation Optimization system (introduced on the X100S), suggesting it's something we should expect to see become more common across brands in the coming months.

Finally, Sony says the Bionz X chip offers a more advanced version of its context-sensitive, 'area-specific noise reduction', which attempts to identify whether each area of an image represents smooth tone, textured detail or subject edges and apply different amounts of noise reduction accordingly. Later in the review, we'll show you just how well this system works, and also the problems it can create.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Style Name:SEL-2870 Zoom Lens|Verified Purchase
Coming from a Sony NEX 5N background (which I still use and rate highly) I'm loving the EVF, weather-proofing and Menus of the A7. Still to decide which flash to purchase for the camera. The only thing I miss is the touch screen on the 5N for selecting a focus point, though it takes hardly anytime on the A7.

Many years ago I used to lug around a huge C*n#n T90. The A7 is tiny in comparison. In fact it is so light-though by no means cheap feeling-that taking shots single handed is not a problem with the A7. Finding the Pitch and Roll level sensors in the camera really useful too.

Sony has delivered an outstanding bit of kit, and one can only hope that the A7 gains the recognition that it richly deserves for what it is; a truly remarkable camera at an unremarkable price.

I'd just like to add how wonderful the camera is for using legacy and manual focus lenses. The A7 is a joy to use with focus peaking and Pentax/Asahi Takumar lenses with an inexpensive M42 to E-mount adapter. Likewise with Leica summarit lenses, great bang for your buck/pound. Have even started using old Minlota MD lenses with an adapter. Watch those fast legacy lens prices continue to rise as people embrace full-frame and MF with this camera.

Update after 4 months of regular use. Another major bonus of this camera is that it can be easily customised with the designated C1 and C2 buttons, and the other buttons and dials as well. Ergonomically I have found everything to be comfortable to use-it's feather-like compared to a D700-and the recent firmware version 1.2 update has reduced the camera start-up time and increased the AF performance. It would appear that Sony are committed to the FE alpha system.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Sony yet, possibly. 30 Dec 2013
Style Name:Body Only
I bought into Sony's Nex system when they launched the Model 5 in 2010. At that time it was the smallest body to house a dslr sized APS-sensor. Unfortunately, the IQ of the sensor was only so-so, but was really improved with the introduction of the 5N in 2011. This model was a significant advance and was able to take the quite superb, although expensive, add-on EVF. For me this transformed how the camera handled.

Although it was often criticised, I never really had any problems with Sony's menu system, but the limitation was the 1.5x crop factor when using legacy 35mm camera lenses. This made trying to get a genuine wide angle view more problematic; even my 24mm Leica lens only behaved as a 35mm with respect to the FoV. So, like many, I dreamt of an affordable FF sensor camera, but I did not want the size and weight of a dslr and its attendant lenses, and Leica M was priced way over budget. Many thought that Sony would eventually come out with such a model, but the idea of it being similar to the Nex range, perhaps an updated Nex 7, was poo-pooed in the press in view of the E mount with its very short back lens flange to sensor distance. Well, Sony proved them all wrong when they released on to an unsuspecting market the A7 and A7R, and at the same time caught all the other camera manufacturers napping. Here, now, was an opportunity to use my prime film camera lenses, but at their native FoV.

Some good news is Sony has not forgotten its legion of Nex users. Whilst the A7 has a FF sensor, E mount lenses intended for the APS-C sensor used in all Nex models can be used with the A7, albeit with a reduced resolution of 10 megapixels. The A7 can be set to detect when an E lens is mounted and will automatically adjust the framing to APS-C size.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My wait is over 11 Jun 2014
Style Name:Body Only|Verified Purchase
It's probably worth saying that, the unloved Canon EOS M aside, there are no really bad mirrorless systems to buy into at the moment and that anyone in the market for the A7 or the A7R has probably also had a long hard look at the Fuji X series or an Olympus or Panasonic Micro 4/3 body.

It can be a tricky decision, since for most people it’s an investment in a system including lenses and other accoutrements that rapidly cost more than the body alone. An investment that might reasonably be expected to last for 5 years or more.

These other systems certainly have their attractions: The Fuji bodies have a striking retro SLR and rangefinder appeal with fast all metal prime glass purposely designed to set alight the hearts of photographers for whom a 35mm Summilux remains as dreamy as the Leica glow.

The Olympus OMD EM1 pitches in with its weather sealing, quick autofocus and that very wide range of M43 lenses, all of which are good and some of which are the equal of anything made for a competing system, full frame or not.

And yet, there is something about the final emergence of reasonably sized full frame in the digital world that feels to this old film SLR user like returning home to something sensible after a long and trying digital absence.

Getting down to brass tacks, a few pros and cons after first use.

+ FF at last. Woot ! No more having to multiply things by 1.3, 1.5, 1.6 or 2. DOF as she was in the 1980s when I were a lad. Stepping gently round internet flamewars about equivalence in DOF and light gathering.
+ Manual lenses a plenty of course, with adaptors at £20 a pop. Buy now before the entire stock of R, OM, FD and PK lenses is exhausted in five years time and a battered Pentax 50/1.7 is going for £200.
+ High ISO.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Unbelievable Performance in a Small Package
I absolutely love this camera!

Whenever I see DSLR users these days, I am reminded how compact the A7 really is. Read more
Published 1 month ago by James Nolan
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome camera
Finally dragged me away from Canon. Possibly the perfect landscape camera for me. Not as big as the DSLRs. Canon 5d has had to go. Lenses are a bit of an issue. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Nick Beadle
5.0 out of 5 stars A game changer
I'm sure you've read all the reviews, or you wouldn't be considering spending over a thousand pounds on a camera body, so I'll just cover the actual experiences I've had of using... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Anthony Robins
5.0 out of 5 stars I mean Wow!
For years I have been searching for that single piece of kit that will shoot perfect stills and perfect video. In the Sony a7 that quest is finally at an end. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Dr. G. J. Pepper
4.0 out of 5 stars Generally great camera.
From the professional reviews I read online, this camera meets most of my expectations (especially consider Steve Huff). Read more
Published 6 months ago by Joe
5.0 out of 5 stars Landmark camera
After using the D800E, E-M1, X-pro1 and M9 I can say this is a landmark camera.
A classic in the same way as the Canon 5D originally introduced FF to people in general. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars Full frame beast in a small body
The camera is brilliant for what it is, a full-frame one-of-a-kind compact resolution beast (the a7R is even more of a beast). Read more
Published 6 months ago by The Blue Reviewer
5.0 out of 5 stars Really Fantastic
I've had the camera about three weeks now, and am bowled over by it. It exudes quality, feels great in my (rather large) hands and most importantly takes fantastic photos (well, I... Read more
Published 7 months ago by BWFC77
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality photos in a compact package
At last a full frame mirrorless digital camera. Well done Sony. It's small and light and can be used with a multitude of lenses with the correct adapters. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Zakk
5.0 out of 5 stars Lovin it
lets face it we are talking about a large sum of money for a body only camera which ever way you look at it. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Artistic Dyslexic
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