Son of Rambow 2007

Amazon Instant Video

(54) IMDb 7.1/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

In this charming comedy, Will's family is the Plymouth Brethern - he's not allowed to listen to music or watch TV. When he gets caught up with school terror Lee he sees a pirate copy of a Rambo film.

Starring:
Zofia Brooks, Neil Dudgeon
Runtime:
1 hour 31 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

Son of Rambow

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Action & Adventure, Comedy
Director Garth Jennings
Starring Zofia Brooks, Neil Dudgeon
Supporting actors Tallulah Evans, Adam Godley, Jessica Stevenson, Diane Leach, Bill Milner, Will Poulter
Studio StudioCanal
BBFC rating Suitable for 12 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By @GeekZilla9000 TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 July 2009
Format: Blu-ray
Will, a boy from a deeply religious family background is forbidden to watch TV or play with any bad influences at school, however he becomes involved with Lee Carter the school bully and ends up watching his first film - `Rambo: First Blood', and from that moment on his life is changed...

...Although Lee seems brash and aggressive, we get an insight into his home-life, a family damaged by parental absence. He is actually a very creative boy with a passion for film, and he dreams of winning a TV competition for youth film makers. It is the wide-eyed innocent Will though who becomes his friend and helps him to try and realise his dream.

Son Of Rambow touches on issues of religion without `taking sides', it simply highlights the sacrifices some make in order to celebrate their faith, and the memory Will's mum has over having to get rid of her treasured music is a very poignant moment in the film and helps to cement an empathy with her son and how he must be feeling in a modern age with the restrictions the Brethren.

The main focuses of this film though are friendship and bullying. Both are very closely linked, the cliché of bullies usually being victims themselves is an apt one, and it's no different here. We see bullies become victims and we see those who are revered by many also be looked down at by others. The message is tenderly spoonfed in a gentle film, it's mainly the acting of young Bill Milner who makes the film an endearing watch. He manages to come across as a genuinely excited boy who is excited by the world and what it has to offer, you never feel as though he is acting, he looks so natural in the role.

In a nutshell: I enjoyed this film, but I didn't love it.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By C. MacLellan VINE VOICE on 6 July 2008
Format: DVD
The 1980s gave us the world many things - yuppies, shoulder pads, the Falklands War, and for the purposes of this review, the children's TV show Screen Test. One of the first `reality shows', it allowed kids to send their own short films into the programme, to compete against other kids, to win a plasticy, trophy thing - and more importantly, appear on TV.

So, after sneaking into a showing of First Blood, wild child Lee Carter (Will Poluter) decides he's going to win the Screen Test competition by making his own version of the Sly Stallone feature. Following a chance meeting in the school corridor, he manages to rope in the help of Will Proudfoot (Bill Milner) as his leading man, throwing him into lakes and sending him flying into pits of tar. However, Will's new found pastime does not go down well with his mother (Jessica Hynes), as her family are part of the Brethren, a group which forbids it's members from watching films or television, in an attempt to insulate itself from the outside world. Although the two boys come from completely different backgrounds, both are loners, and in each other, find their `blood brother'.

The baby of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy director Garth Jennings, Son of Rambow is a semi-autobiographical account of the director's childhood. The film is a homage to the 1980s which Jennings grew up in, similar to that seen in Shane Meadow's This Is England. From the music of Depeche Mode, to the language used ("Skill" as in "Skill on toast"), right down to the minute details, such as the guide-dog-shaped charity collection boxes outside the supermarket, Jennings is transporting many of his viewers back to the age they grew up in.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. P. Buckle on 16 April 2008
Format: DVD
This Film is a must. it is a bit slow to start off but once it gets going boy is it great. My Autistic son absolutely loved it and went to see it another time.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Koikby on 12 Aug 2008
Format: Blu-ray
I wasn't sure if I was going to enjoy this film but it was great. The opening titles made me laugh out loud. The humour of the two boys' adventures was well timed and well balanced against the emotional family story. Both the main characters are believable and all actors put in a great performance, especially Jessica Hines. The special effects where used are excellent. You'll have to try hard not to shed a tear at the end. It's definitely worth watching!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By 2cleverbyhalf on 31 July 2008
Format: DVD
Good - nostalgia trip for anyone over 40, atheists will like the swipe at fundamentalism, 'cool' french kids and their perception by 'uncool' english kids, fun for older parents to watch with younger kids ('what's tracking dad ?')
Bad - american levels of mawkishness at the end, yet another film about how sad it is when a boy loses his dad, yet another film about outsider kids becoming accepted as cool, some really bad acting (i.e. the potential new dad)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. David Butler on 6 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
The idea doesnt seem interestinmg and could be forgettable but the cast of kids and the touching premise of unlikely friendship works so well and also being set in the early 80's captures the time period perfectly. Will Poulter has gone on to bigger things now but this shows how good he is being a problem child but having charm as well and im sure many can relate to knowing someone like him when we were kids.
So a well above average gem that adults and teenagers can enjoy.
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