Somme Success and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£10.00
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Leo Cooper; 2001; 9.44 X 6.90 X 0.64 inches; Hardcover; Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket; In 'read once' condition Near Fine, very slight signs of ownership ow as new. No marks or inscriptions.; 224 Pages; 0850527414; War
Trade in your item
Get a £4.04
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Somme Success: the Royal Flying Corps and the Battle of the Somme, 1916 Hardcover – 7 Mar 2001


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£39.99 £10.00

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £4.04
Trade in Somme Success: the Royal Flying Corps and the Battle of the Somme, 1916 for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £4.04, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Leo Cooper; First Edition edition (7 Mar. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0850527414
  • ISBN-13: 978-0850527414
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 17.5 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,065,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Hart has worked as the Oral Historian of the Imperial War Museum since 1981. He is the author of several books on the Great War. His latest work Is 'Fire and Movement: The British Expeditionary Force and the Campaign of 1914'. In a former life he was the lead singer of the Liverpool punk rock band 'Those Naughty Lumps'.

Product Description

Review

Really excellent book. Conveys to the reader a real sense of what it must have been like to be a pioneer air-fighter carrying out reconnaissance, artillery observation, contact patrols, interdiction, longer range bombing missions and air-superiority work. The text is supplemented by many well chosen illustrations. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it both to serious scholars of WW1 aviation history but also to those just embarking on a study of this ever-fascinating topic and indeed anyone who wishes to be informed, enlightened and entertained. Flying In Ireland --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Rob L on 24 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
The Battle of the Somme, 1st July 1916 - entrenched in the minds of many thanks to various television programs and films as many thousands of men pointlessly going 'over the top' and walking slowly towards the German trenches and getting slaughtered by German machine guns. Whatever your views on the Battle of the Somme and as to whether it was a victory or defeat for the British (and French - who were also there in very large numbers), it cannot be denied that it was a victory for the British in the air. The Royal Flying Corps enjoyed aerial superiority which meant it was possible to conduct bombing raids behind enemy lines, disrupting lines of communication, transport links and killing the enemy before they got to the front line. Observation Patrols were able to operate in relative safety, spying on the German positions from above and able to direct artillery fire onto machine gun posts, large concentrations of troops, and especially artillery positions. Photography from the extremely stable BE2 aircraft meant accurate trench maps were able to be produced, and the men on the ground were able to know exactly what lay over the parapet and beyond the horizon. All of this was possible thanks to the new breed of aircraft that were entering service in 1916 to combat the Fokker Eindecker with it's forward firing machine gun, firing through the propeller arc thanks to interrupter gear.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alan Pearson on 23 July 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book after reading Aces Falling and other books by this author. An excellent book, well researched with the usual combination of factual data interspersed with personal accounts. The cover shows an observer firing over the upper wing of an FE2b and there a couple of accounts of this in the book, made my feet sweat just reading it. Another excellent book by Peter Hart, well worth a read or two
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a life long enthusiast for all things connected with aviation up to the 1950's, I read this book with a mounting admiration for the (usually) very young men who went up day after day, sometimes up to seven times a day to carry out the work of reconnaisance or "scouting", prior to and during the Battle of the Somme.

The life expectancy of the young pilots, without the benefit of parachutes, as the High Command thought the provision of such an item would encourage the pilot to leave his aircraft too early, (!!) was in many cases very short indeed. Some of them arriving at a squadron and being killed on their first operational patrol.

Peter Hart has done a superb job of providing all the detail one might want and yet managing to keep it in a very readable format, and without ever allowing the subject to become in any way tedious.

I loved the book and if you have any interest in WW1 aviation I am sure you will as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bookgeek on 17 April 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Concise and thorough, I have found this to be an invaluable book that I am using as part of my research for a fictional account of WW1.
A real bargain at this price too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Von Gutersloh on 20 Nov. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is required reading for anyone who has an interest in the Great War. It provides an excellent insight into the men and machines from both sides who fought and died above the trenches of the Somme battlefield in 1916. Using quotes from participants such as Albert Ball & Lanoe Hawker VC from the RFC and Manfred Von Richtofen and Oswald Boelke from the GAF. This is well written. I would recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martin Body on 10 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent book by an excellent author. A very detailed and accurate account of aerial fighting and artillery spotting in 1916.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Anhistorian on 30 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
One of the country's top historians gives a readable and well researched book on the first world war, essential for anyone with general interest. Good background for teachers. Debunks myths on flyers
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JRThompson1969 on 9 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A multitude of books have been written about the war on the ground but this is an eminently readable account of the war in the sky.

The first successful ever flight had only taken pleace a few years prior to the start of the Great War yet Peter Hart expertly guides us through an account not only of the campaign but the development of flying itself.

The Allies, for the most part, had control of the skies and through a series of pictures and fascinating personal accounts we see how the Royal Flying Corps developed its role and contribution as the capabilities of their machines progressed.

We have contributions from the Allied and German sides; the Germans made full public use of their pilots successes whilst the British pilots success was kept more underwraps - the names of German aces like Oswold Boelck and Manfrd evon Richtofen being well known to the British public.

I would fully recommend this book, now available in paper back, for it's thriiling account of the Royal Flying Corps Somme Success.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback