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A Soldier's Song: True Stories from the Falklands Paperback – 2 Jun 1997


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Product details

  • Paperback: 191 pages
  • Publisher: Orion; New edition edition (2 Jun 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752810952
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752810959
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 1.7 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,512,150 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Ken Lukowiak was born in 1959. He served with 2 Para in the Falklands War. Despite his conviction for drug possession he was discharged from the army with an Exemplary Conduct Record. Soldier¿s Song was published in 1992 and became an instant classic.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Feb 1999
Format: Paperback
I can only wholeheartedly endorse the review of the reader from NZ. Nicely structured in bite-sized pieces (though you'll probably find yourself wanting to devour it virtually in one go), it's a very, very honest account, written with humanity and that (black) humour and cockiness which seems to form part of the psychological survival kit of the British "grunt". Not for the truely faint-hearted because of the episodes it depicts (i.e. realities of war) and British para language (direct), it's one of the best books I've ever read, too. Thoroughly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Nov 1998
Format: Paperback
Ken Lukowiak's account of his service in the Falklands war is a total gem. Cleverly structured and laced with marvelous humour, he has devised a riveting tale of a soldiers lot. Moreover, his total honesty in dealing with both his own frailties and the longer term effects of war are a revelation. Not just in their content, but in the way he has delivered their lessons. A very powerful book and one of the best I have ever read. Certainly one of the few on the subject of war that should have universal appeal. I can only thoroughly recommend it!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Jan 2000
Format: Paperback
When I was a boy, we had a milkman known as the midnight milkman because he delivered milk at night: anything up to 11 pm. This midnight milkman had a fantastic sense of humour but from time to time something would happen to turn him philosophical. One night, following the outbreak of conflict somewhere, the milkman said that if, for example, Britain and Argentina wanted to argue about the Falklands, then let Margaret Thatcher and General Galtieri step into a boxing ring and sort it out between them.
The milkman's idea never left me and has been revived by Ken Lukowiak's book. Lukowiak paints a picture of a war that just wouldn't let me get beyond Thatcher and Galtieri being the ones to sort it all out.
So much stupidity clearly goes into something like the Falkland's war. The story about Lukowiak in Buenos Aires being on the receiving end of Argentine anger for having shot a fellow, albeit Argentine, soldier epitomises the problem. Lukowiak didn't shoot an Argentine soldier, he defended himself against otherwise certain death: the Argentine soldier was defending himself too, but wasn't quick enough or accurate enough to succeed. Soldiers in such situations are trained to solve such problems, not discuss them around the conference table. The consequence is that at least one family hates the bejeezus out of one other person and everything he stands for. Ridiculous: Thatcher cannot defend herself for having done what she did and neither can Galtieri. The British and Argentine people got themselves caught up in jingoism and are largely blameless.
Coincidentally, as I type this, there is a film on the television in which a young lad locks his parents in their cellar after they seem to be heading for divorce.
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