• RRP: £24.95
  • You Save: £4.99 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Soldiers of Destruction: ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by fatbrainbooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Dispatch Same Working Day, (Delivery 2-4 business days, Courier For Heavy/Expensive Items) Money Back Guarantee, 99.3% Customer Satisfaction, Prompt Customer Service.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.87
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Soldiers of Destruction: The SS Death's Head Division, 1933-1945. (with a New Preface) Paperback – 1 May 1990


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.96
£12.99 £3.99
£19.96 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Soldiers of Destruction: The SS Death's Head Division, 1933-1945. (with a New Preface) + Für Volk and Führer. The Memoir of a Veteran of the 1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler
Price For Both: £44.96

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.87
Trade in Soldiers of Destruction: The SS Death's Head Division, 1933-1945. (with a New Preface) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.87, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 396 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Updated edition with a New Preface edition (1 May 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691008531
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691008530
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.5 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 775,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Sydnor has managed to assemble a painstakingly detailed and annotated account that is at the same time an interest-holding horror story."--Publishers Weekly

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE Waffen SS Totenkopfdivision emerged from two significant interrelated forces in the structure of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 May 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a terrific book. As Sydnor points out, it has had a long life, & justly so. I found it very hard to put down. The author does an excellent job of placing you beside the action. His information on Eicke himself is equally impressive. It was fascinating reading about the care & amazing effort Eicke put into the division seemingly 24 hours a day. The entire book is meticulously researched & it has tons of great footnotes. To my knowledge it is the only sole work on the
Totenkopfdivision. It definitely must be on the shelf of everyone interested in the Waffen SS or Wehrmacht. Although opinions of the SSTK's conduct may vary from the author's, thank you Mr. Sydnor for such a great study.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Super Sec on 30 April 2008
Format: Paperback
A thorough and excellent review of the SS Totenkopf from inception (Totenkopfverbande)to downfall(Panzerkorps). Eicke's personality and zeal is revealed showing how it played such an important part in moulding his officers and troops. The interplay between concentration camp duty and duty on the Front Line is also fully explained.

Perhaps a few more detailed maps could have been included of the battles on the Eastern Front for clarity's sake but I am still in awe of the men who had to fight in such conditions.

This book kept me enthralled right to the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Jan. 2001
Format: Paperback
The type of book you need to read in order to understand some of the finer mechanisms behind the large canvas of WWII. Very interesting insight into organisation of KZ-camps, and the close links between the camp system and certain units on the battlefield.
Suffers slightly from lack of direct sources for the latter period of the war.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Jun. 1998
Format: Paperback
Theodore Eicke was the original, pre-war commander of the concentration camp system. At the start of WW2, he formed the Totenkopfverbande as a unit for occupation duty in Poland (primarily "Final Solution" executions and the like), which became a combat unit in the invasion of France, and ultimately became one of the foremost tank divisions on the eastern front. Their rise came primarily from their resolute defense of a wooded area near Leningrad, which was instrumental in convincing Hitler to expand the Waffen SS at the expense of the army in 1942. SS Totenkopf became a fire brigade sent in to stabilize the front where it seemed on the verge of collapse. They were known more for their resolute determination to fight to the last man, rather than for any tactical brilliance. This served them well in many unwinnable situations in the latter part of the war.
The book provides a far more balanced picture of Theodore Eicke than is available elsewhere. Most other books portray him as a raving lunatic sprung from a straight jacket (literally) to command the concentration camps. This book shows Eicke's original commitment to a mental institution to have been entirely political. During his reign in the camps, he made a lot of connections, which enabled him to do remarkably well at requisitioning equipment (much of which was produced in the camps, or stored in warehouses adjacent to them). Eicke had a great rapport with his men, but was extremely brutal with those who got on his wrong side.
In another book, "Wenn Alle Bruder Schweigen", there is a reference to Felix Steiner being the commander of Totenkopf after Eicke's death. However, "Soldiers of Destruction" makes no reference to Steiner. I am not sure what to make of this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback