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Soldier
 
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Soldier

22 July 2000 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:15
30
2
3:26
30
3
3:23
30
4
3:06
30
5
2:46
30
6
4:24
30
7
1:50
30
8
4:05
30
9
3:28
30
10
3:58
30
11
3:10
30
12
3:02
30
13
4:26
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Product details

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
One of my favourite Iggy albums.

I bought it as I was a major Shriekback fan in the Eighties and anything with Barry Andrews on it was purchased, otherwise I'd probably never have been an Iggy fan, as I was quite conservative with my tastes.

I can listen to the whole album without a single grumble. I'm not expert enough to do a deconstruct on the technical side of the music, just tell you that I'm still playing this 20 plus years on.

Hello my friends, is everybody happy?

I am!

P.S. At least the silly sod wasn't advertising car insurance when he did this.
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Format: Audio CD
Iggy recorded three albums for Arista - this is in my opinion the best of the bunch.

What makes it so special is its quirkiness and this is down to the musicians and in particular, Keyboard player Barry Andrews. Andrews spent his early career with XTC and his playing is very reminiscent of his work on XTC's first albums - pumping, driven and highly original. Guitars are provided by Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols.

At this time, Iggy was in his post-Bowie phase and perhaps looking for a new direction. The result is an album bursting with strong, intelligent compositions, making this a great listen and a worthy addition to the Iggy Pop back catalogue, despite the fact that it was apparently a chaotic album to make with a lot of tension and bust-ups.

Don't pass it by - give it a go; I don't think you will be disappointed.
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Format: Audio CD
Out of the three discs Iggy Pop cut for Arista Records during the period 1979-1981, this one is by far the worst. 1979's New Values was an energetic, polished and experimental new-wave rock album that was well received critically, and deserved a much wider audience. After hitting the road to play successful shows across Europe and the States, Pop decamped to Wales to record a follow-up. He assembled a punk-rock 'supergroup' of sorts, including Glen Matlock, formerly of the Sex Pistols, Steve New, guitarist in Matlock's post-Pistols outfit, Rich Kids, Barry Andrews, keyboardist with XTC, and Klaus Kruger, ex-Tangerine Dream. Pop even got his old Stooges cohort, James Williamson, back on production duties, having made such grand work of New Values. This album could, and perhaps should, have been excellent - unfortunately the album seriously lacks memorable songs, and is characterised in the main by goofy, blank-eyed lyrics and a tunelessness that The Stooges might have been able to get away with through sheer volume and raw power. For the most part, this album has neither, and just sounds tinny and flat.

Its not all hopeless, though. Loco Mosquito is a chirpy, XTC-influenced slab of new wave, featuring Barry Andrews contributing some deft, hyperactive chiming keyboard parts, whilst Pop refers to the good-old, bad-old days he spent in Berlin hanging around with David Bowie in drag bars. I Need More is the sort of straightforward, no-nonsense autobiographical song Pop perfected on New Values; with the onset of greed-is-good capitalism and Reaganism, Pop laments, or celebrates, the amount he needs to get by in the modern world.
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Format: Audio CD
Although it is often regarded by some as one of Iggy s weaker albums I disagree I think that it holds up very well today .It is full of catchy tunes and the production is excellent . Although some would say that it is not full of classics it has great songs like knockin em down and i'm a conservative . My personal favourite is the Glen Matlock written ambition which I would put in Iggys top five songs of all time .
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Format: Audio CD
Iggy Pop was riding pretty high when he and an assortment of punk/new wave royalty decamped to Rockfield studios to record the album that then label Arista hoped would finally see his long time cult appeal translate into substantial sales.
Hot off the press from the positive notices garnered to predecessor 'New Values',which reunited Ig with ex Stooge sparring partner James Wiliamson and proved he could still make interesting noises without the assistance of mentor David Bowie,Iggy recruited a backing band that included the likes of Ex Pistol Glen Matlock, Patti Smith's Ival Kral, former XTC keyboards whizz Barry Andrews (then working a day job at London Zoo) and Rich Kids guitarist Steve New.
What occured next is the stuff of both myth and legend: tales of upteen takes, guns pulled on frazzled musicians, and Bowie (becaped in Scarlet Pimpernel style attire) attempting once more to help out his old pal and getting a biff in the chops (alledgedly) for his troubles. It all proved too much for producer James Wiliamson, who quit the unfinished project shortly afterwards.
What followed was a salvage job that saw, following another row, Steve New's layered lead guitar parts cut from the masters, leaving a bizarre mix of vocals, drums, bass, keys and the odd bit of rhythm guitar.Iggy's vocals sound strained and desperate, and whilst there are odd snatches of some genuienly interesting ideas, the whole thing comes across half baked and largely incoherent.
Iggy Pop has never made a boring record, but 'Soldier' marks the beginning of a period when he seemed bored with himself, or at least perhaps bored of the public's perceptions and expectations of him.
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