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Software Systems Architecture: Working With Stakeholders Using Viewpoints and Perspectives Hardcover – 20 Apr 2005


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 1 edition (20 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321112296
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321112293
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 3.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 603,129 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

Software Systems Architecture is a practitioner-oriented guide to designing and implementing effective architectures for information systems. It is both a readily accessible introduction to software architecture and an invaluable handbook of well-established best practices. It shows why the role of the architect is central to any successful information-systems development project, and, by presenting a set of architectural viewpoints and perspectives, provides specific direction for improving your own and your organization's approach to software systems architecture.

With this book you will learn how to

  • Design an architecture that reflects and balances the different needs of its stakeholders
  • Communicate the architecture to stakeholders and demonstrate that it has met their requirements
  • Focus on architecturally significant aspects of design, including frequently overlooked areas such as performance, resilience, and location
  • Use scenarios and patterns to drive the creation and validation of your architecture
  • Document your architecture as a set of related views
  • Use perspectives to ensure that your architecture exhibits important qualities such as performance, scalability, and security

The architectural viewpoints and perspectives presented in the book also provide a valuable long-term reference source for new and experienced architects alike.

Whether you are an aspiring or practicing software architect, you will find yourself referring repeatedly to the practical advice in this book throughout the lifecycle of your projects.

A supporting Web site containing further information can be found at www.viewpoints-and-perspectives.info



About the Author

Nick Rozanski is an enterprise technical architect at Marks and Spencer, where he focuses on integration and workflow. During his more than twenty years of experience he has worked for companies such as Logica, Capgemini, and Sybase. His technology experience covers enterprise application integration, relational databases, and object-oriented software development. He is also an experienced technical instructor and certified internal project auditor.

Eoin Woods is a principal consultant at Züehlke Engineering in London, where he works as a consultant software architect focusing on trading and investment management companies in the financial markets. He has worked in the software engineering field for fifteen years with a number of companies, including Ford Motor Company, Groupe Bull, InterTrust Technologies, and Sybase.




Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Today's large-scale software systems are among the most complex structures ever built by humans, containing millions of lines of code, thousands of database tables, and hundreds of components, all running on dozens of computers. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dan Haywood on 15 Nov. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Full disclosure: I used to work with Nick and Eoin in Sybase UK's consulting division. One of the ongoing arguments we would always have was, what exactly architecture, when applied to software systems, actually is. So, finally, I have a book that I can point to and say, the stuff that's in there is a pretty good basis for what architecture is for and more importantly how architects should do it. And (please believe me), these two guys definitely know how to do it.
The book builds on the old 4+1 viewpoints stuff, though Nick and Eoin rename some of them for clarity. They've also introduced one further one to end up with 6 in all. Then they've introduced a new concept - perspectives - that serves as a handle for all the cross-cutting stuff, eg security, i18n and so on. So we have a 2-dimensional space of things to think about.
Of course, it's impossible for any architect to fully explore this space before the building must begin, but in this book the authors help show how to prioritize work best to maximise success.
If there's one thing this book skirts around, it is how architecture fits into agile development processes. But if you are an architect who's always bluffed it, or a developer wanting to move into architecture, then I recommend you buy this book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Peter Eeles on 18 Dec. 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My reason for buying this book was to hear what the authors had to say about handling cross-cutting architectural concerns (such as security), which they refer to as "perspectives". The authors offer refreshing insights into how such concerns should be interwoven with the architecture views/viewpoints with which many architects will already be familiar when documenting their software architectures.
But now that I've finally finished reading the book (500+ pages) I have to say that this book is so much more. This is essentially a "book of 2 halves". The first half discusses fundamental architecture concepts, and various elements of the architecture process. However, the second half of the book is dedicated to a catalog of viewpoints and a catalog of perspectives. These sections are, I think, the most valuable, and offer probably the best overview of different architectural concerns (such as concurrency, deployment, operations, security, availability etc.) I've come across. And the whole book is liberally sprinkled with pragmatic advice, and examples, based on the authors' experiences.
In summary, the book makes a great "handbook" for both novice and experienced architects.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chandan Chowdhury on 22 Jan. 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book will serve the new and experienced architects equally. For new architects, it provides an excellent guide to a fairly contemporary world of systems architecture and helps in looking at it from various "viewpoints" and "perspectives" used by the author. This will help enormously in finding a rationale for choice of methods in any part of architecture you are involved in, be it application, data, infrastructure, security, performance & scalability etc. For the experienced ones, it will help in focussing on a particular area and delve into it in more detail. I found the examples cited to be useful and author's usage of structure UML to illustrate the examples. I would also suggest to read the Bass, Clements' book on Documenting software architecture together with this book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was expecting same quality eventhough this book as a used one but was in really good condition. Hats off to seller :). Also the way author has written the book is explaining some good scenarios for people who are doing lateral move from development to architecture and that is really helpful in my scenario.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 26 reviews
35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
Comprehensive view on the subject of Systems Architecture 28 Aug. 2005
By uniq - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
When it comes to the systems or software architecture, I subscribe to Tom Demarco's definition: "An architecture is a framework for the disciplined introduction of change." ([...] And while most of the job postings matching "architect" these days talk about the need for writing and testing code, there is a growing awareness in the industry that in order to build a resilient enterprise system an organization must look beyond design patterns and coding idioms. In addition to the technical challenges, building large enterprise system requires effort of many professionals during an extended period of time. This brings other non-technical risks into the picture.

This is one of the better books covering many issues that comprise System Architecture discipline in the light of their personal experience. The authors introduce us to an approach for partitioning architecture using Viewpoints (behavioral characteristics, e.g. Functional, Information, Concurrency, Development, Deployment, Operational) and Perspectives (nonfunctional aspects, e.g. Security, Performance and Scalability, Availability and Resilience, Evolution).

The first half of the book describes the discipline of Application Software Architecture, the second half contains two catalogs, one for Viewpoints and the other for Perspectives. Both catalogs describe concerns, artifacts (models), problems and pitfalls when focusing on a viewpoint or perspective.

I would qualify this book as a companion and reference for a beginner through intermediate level. It gives an excellent overview of what a system architect has to go through day in and day out to achieve success. The book contains a wealth of advice on what to pay and not pay attention to in any particular stage of the architectural development. The authors clearly speak from personal experience. Their examples are always to the point, although a bit sketchy with respect to details on techniques and artifacts and how to develop and use them. Considering the site of the volume, the authors did an excellent job balancing width and depth of coverage: trying to cover such a vast discipline in detail in a 500+-page book is not possible.
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Every IT architect should read this book 3 Jan. 2006
By Peter Eeles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
My reason for buying this book was to hear what the authors had to say about handling cross-cutting architectural concerns (such as security), which they refer to as "perspectives". The authors offer refreshing insights into how such concerns should be interwoven with the architecture views/viewpoints with which many architects will already be familiar when documenting their software architectures.

But now that I've finally finished reading the book (500+ pages) I have to say that this book is so much more. This is essentially a "book of 2 halves". The first half discusses fundamental architecture concepts, and various elements of the architecture process. However, the second half of the book is dedicated to a catalog of viewpoints and a catalog of perspectives. These sections are, I think, the most valuable, and offer probably the best overview of different architectural concerns (such as concurrency, deployment, operations, security, availability etc.) I've come across. And the whole book is liberally sprinkled with pragmatic advice, and examples, based on the authors' experiences.

In summary, the book makes a great "handbook" for both novice and experienced architects.
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Simply Excellent 1 Jun. 2005
By T. Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
SECOND EDITION REVIEW:
Some might look at my book collect and think I have hoarding issues. If I had to pick just one Software Architecture book to keep, this would be the one.

This is the second edition of one of the best books written on software systems architecture. If you are in the software development industry, you should read this book. If you are a Software Architect, you must read this book.

This book covers a vast amount of material but it ties it all together in a way that paints a complete picture of what software systems architecture is all about.

The book starts out covering architecture fundamentals. There is a chapter on Software Architecture Concepts, Viewpoints and Views, Architectural Perspectives, and The Role of the Software Architect.

It then presents a process for software architecture and explains all the elements involved with the process. This part of the book contains chapters on The Architecture Definition Process, Concerns, Principles and Decisions, Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders, Identifying and Using Scenarios, Using Styles and Patterns, Producing Architectural Models, and Evaluating the Architecture.

Next is a viewpoint catalog. The part of the book goes into the details of the different viewpoints the authors recommend considering as part of you architectural analysis. The viewpoints include Context, Information, Functional, Concurrency, Information, Development, Deployment, and Operational. Each viewpoint is a separate chapter. This section ends with a chapter that show how to achieve consistency across views.

After the viewpoint catalog the authors present a perspective catalog. Perspectives ensure that quality properties that cross several views are accounted for and analyzed. The perspective catalog includes Security, Performance and Scalability, Availability and Resilience, Evolution, Accessibility, Development Resource, Internationalization, Location, Regulation, and Usability.

The book ends with a chapter that ties everything together and a nice appendix that shows the relationship of the author's Viewpoints and Perspectives to other processes. They include Kruchten 4+1, RM-ODP, Siemens, SEI's Views and Beyond, Garland and Anthony, IAF, Zachman, and TOGAF.

I am lucky they came out with a second edition because my first edition is getting pretty beat up. It has scribbling from tons of different projects in it. The first edition has not left my side since I purchased it and this second edition won't leave my side either.

One of the things I like about this book is that the authors complete the picture. They don't say here is one example of a pitfall, concern, or tactic, they present a nice long list that really helps lead you through the process. Keeping this book handy helps me think of things I am sure to overlook.

Another thing I like about this book is that it is not a reinvention of the wheel. The authors do a great job of incorporating industry best practices that have withstood the test of time, as well as included all the newer elements of software architecture that have come about in recent years.

If you have the first edition, the second edition is worth getting. There is updated information scattered throughout the book as well as a new Context viewpoint. There has been 132 pages added.

I said this about the first version and it still holds true with the second edition... Even if you are not an architect it is a great book to buy so you understand what to expect out of one. I may buy a few extra copies to give out on projects so they understand why I am supposed to be there. Anyone reading this book should have a great and complete understanding of architecture and the value it adds to a project.

FIRST EDITION REVIEW:
This is an awesome book for Architects. It ties together the SEI books Software Architecture in Practice, 2nd Edition and Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond in its own way making Architecture very understandable.

I am not going to blabber about each chapter I will just say they are all excellent and complete. Go to the book's site for more info on the details of the book. [...]

I have over 10 years of experience as a software architect. This book is an excellent addition to my library. It is an easy read with tons of info in it.

Even if you are not an architect it is a great book to buy so you understand what to expect out of one. I may buy a few extra copies to give out on projects so they understand why I am supposed to be there. Anyone reading this book should have a great and complete understanding of architecture and the value it adds to a project.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Informative, Practical, Insightful: a must-have for working architects! 18 Aug. 2005
By paulsm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This very readable book covers covers a lot of ground. It's a great introduction for those interested in software architecture; it's also a got a lot of great insights and useful information for practicing s/w architects.

Two of the main benefits this book has over other architecture books are:

a) it's one of the more up-to-date (Spring/2005) texts available on the subject

b) it's agnostic: giving equal coverage to all of the main schools, rather than focusing on just one.

One (relatively) unique idea in this book is the notion of "views" (as in Hofmeister or Krutchen) vs "perspectives"; perspectives being issues such as "security" that tend to cut *across* views.

Another thing I really liked was the emphasis on "architecture" as fundamentally driven by, and created for - the *stakeholders*.

This book is a great buy: it contains a lot of interesting, useful and important ideas and information about the art and science of software architecture.

Very, very highly recommended!
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Brings many things together 13 July 2006
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was impressed with this book's unique perspective of blending the business and technical needs into a single focus, and it continued to maintain the human considerations. It does an excellent job of describing how to support business decisions through architecture at a macro level in a style where "the rubber hits the road."

If you are a systems analyst or a software development manager, this shouldn't be on your book shelf - it should be on your desk for regular reference.
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