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Snuff: (Discworld Novel 39) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 7 Jun 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi (7 Jun 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552166758
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552166751
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (545 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,790 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Terry Pratchett is the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he is the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he is the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Review

"[Discworld is] Warm, silly, compulsively readable, fantastically inventive, surprisingly serious exploration in story form of just about any aspect of our world...Where other writers are delighted if they come up with just a handful of comic figures with self-sustaining life in them - Don Quixote and Sancho, the three men in the boat, Pooh and Piglet and Eeyore - Pratchettt breeds them by the score...There's never been anything quite like it." (Francis Spufford Evening Standard)

"Pratchett is a master storyteller. He is endlessly inventive...a master of complex jokes, good bad jokes, good dreadful jokes and a kind of insidious wisdom about human nature...I read his books at a gallop and then reread them every time I am ill or exhausted." (A. S. Byatt Guardian)

"To keep it fresh into the 39th volume of a series deserves a knighthood...Snuff is entertaining, with all Pratchett's genius on display. He still makes you care about his creations and, amid all the funnies, he can turn on the pathos." (Sunday Express)

"[Pratchett] is now so good at skewering the banalities and injustices of our world through his fantasy creation balanced on the back of a giant turtle that he could probably do it in his sleep...As effortlessly, generously funny as only Pratchett can be, Snuff doesn't stint on laying bare the darker side of life either. A worthy addition to the Discworld canon." (Sunday Times)

"Is there any sign of a falling-off in Sir Terry's extraordinary abilities? No. Not one. This is another brilliant, bravura command performance of comic fantasy. Terry Pratchett with Alzheimer's is still up there with PG Wodehouse. Amazing. Wonderful. Fantastic." (Harry Ritchie Daily Mail)

Book Description

The new Discworld novel from the master sees Sam Vimes investigating a countryhouse murder, and is Terry Pratchett's fiftieth book.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

197 of 208 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Dalby VINE VOICE on 21 Oct 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Commander Vimes is sent to the Shires to his wife's estate for a holiday. But crime seems to follow him anyway and when he finds that a murder has been committed he starts to bring city justice to the country. This means dealing with hot-headed blacksmiths, the poo lady and a Chief Constable who is an expert in Bhangbhangduc, and those are just the "good guys".

Reviewers have said that Sir Terry's books of late are very hit and miss, that they are not as funny as they used to be. They are certainly much longer and less punchy. The humour is much more droll, but more importantly the books are much more thoughtful. Unseen Academicals started the story of racism, with an Orcish footballer who had all the traits of a certain England forward. This time it is the Goblins and how attitudes can be changed, taking them from being vermin to being people. They reflect the times they are written and the issues that are important to Sir Terry.

These are much more serious books, there always was an underlying moral sense to Discworld but in these latest books it is the morality that is more important than the humour. These are morality tales with the real bits left in. In Vimes' world he cannot wave a magic wand so everything turns our better - so he has to take a much more pragmatic route. This makes the book much more thoughtful and much slower than the mad-cap early Discworld, so while they are no longer 5 stars for humour, they are 5 stars for their emotional commitment and making you think.
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93 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Steve Gardiner on 23 Oct 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a Pratchett addict; I took my first dose in 1976 with 'Dark Side of the Sun' and have read everything he's written since (and went back to read 'The Carpet People' and Strata') I read the Nome Trilogy - I even bought 'The Unadulterated Cat'!

For a time in the 90s he spoiled me for other fantasy writers; his style was (to me) so accomplished that others couldn't begin to match him. The earlier Discworld books, from #01 'The Colour of Magic' to #10 'Moving Pictures' were wonderful romps with a hugely imaginative drive. 'Equal Rites,' 'Wyrd Sisters' and 'Guards! Guards!' were the absolute pinnacle of comic fantasy.

Later books (with occasional returns to the earlier broad humour) were darker, more thoughtful and with a more philosophical edge. Gradually the humour became less important to the story - the books were still funny in parts, but the Discworld became less magical and more a distortion of our own world, tackling in more detail real issues such as class, racism and sexism - prejudice in all its ugly forms. He even created a new 'ism' - speciesism. He was at his best in this period when he was angry about prejudice in books like 'Small Gods,' 'Lords and Ladies' and 'Feet of Clay'.

Even the 'lesser' works (again, to me! I know it's subjective) such as 'Soul Music', 'Hogfather' and 'The Last Continent' had enough of the classic Pratchett mix of wisdom and gags to satisfy most of us.

I feel the last great Discworld book (for adults) was 'Thief of Time'. The last great book for younger readers was 'The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents'. Both of these were classic Pratchett, filled with imagination and brio.

And then... things started to change.
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68 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Abbie H on 30 Oct 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I've been a long-time fan of Pratchett ever since getting his first novel The Colour of Magic back in my early teens, and I can honestly say that it's a rare thing to come away with a slight sense of disappointment after finishing one of his books. The sheer fun and whimsy of the early Discworld novels seems to me to have given way to a slightly more darker more muted world, and where once you could expect gag after gag spilling off nearly every single page, now there is a bit more slightly heavy-handed moralising and exposition to get through before you find any gems to remind you of those earlier stories.

Don't get me wrong, I still liked Snuff and there is still much to enjoy in the characters, old favourites like Vimes in particular, but in terms of where I'd rank this in the Discworld series as a whole, I'd have to say somewhere around the middle of the list, tending towards the lower half.

My son is reading the book at the moment and appears to be enjoying it (though some of the more adult ideas pass him by) so even if Snuff is slightly below par for Pratchett, it's still got plenty to offer and, if you're a fan of the series, still worth a read. If you're new to Pratchett, well you're probably better off going right back to the beginning and enjoying the pure unadulterated fun of those early novels.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Wilkie Martin on 11 April 2013
Format: Paperback
As a big fan of Sam Vimes, I thought I'd enjoy this book, and I did. It's a well-crafted story with great characters,and situations. Sometimes it made me laugh and bits of Terry's trademark tragic-relief added to the enjoyment mix. Though I don't think this is one of his very best, it was very good.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alstroemeria on 28 Nov 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love Terry Pratchett and have read every one of his novels but every now and again I there's one I struggle to get through. Vimes used to be my favourite character but with Thud and now this I'm struggling. This is just my opinion and no doubt most readers will feel differently and I certainly don't want to put anyone off. I will carry on reading his novels after all there is only about 3 that I wouldn't give 5 stars to. By all means read and enjoy
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