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Snow Borne Sorrow

36 customer reviews

Price: £18.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
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£18.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (24 Oct. 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Samadhi Sound
  • ASIN: B000B8GUGO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,527 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Wonderful World
2. Darkest Birds
3. The Banality Of Evil
4. Atom and Cell
5. A History Of Holes
6. Snow Borne Sorrow
7. The Day The Earth Stole Heaven
8. Serotonin
9. The Librarian

Product Description

Product Description

Probably the most commercial release that David Sylvian has ever been involved with, Nine Horses still manages to sound unlike any other album out there at the moment. Breaking boundaries, fusing styles and yet delivering beautiful pop melodies and stunning vocals on songs that Sylvian fans everywhere are bound to fall in love with. Nine Horses brings together Sylvian, his brother Steve Jansen (ex-Japan), and the well respected Burnt Friedman and they have created a suite of remarkably poignant songs that are part social commentary and part self-analysis. Sylvian and his collaborators have never sounded better nor the material more immediate. Other guest contributors include: Ryuichi Sakamoto, Stina Nordenstam, Arve Henriksen and many more. Samadhi Sound. 2005.

BBC Review

David Sylvian's new band? Well, hardly: He himself describes Nine Horses as a 'disembodied band'. Initially consisting of Sylvian and brother, Steve Jansen, this project was sidelined by his cathartic Blemish album and was only reactivated by the contribution of electronica guru Burnt Friedman.

In turn many more players were brought into the fold, including old comrade Ryuichi Sakamoto, singer Stina Nordenstam and trumpeter Arve Henriksen, and they turn Snow Borne Sorrow into an ensemble work of haunting beauty. The subject matter still revolves around the failures of both personal and political relationships. Yet Blemish's scant comfort of lonely squeaks and Derek Bailey's scratchy guitar are replaced by a jazz-tinged variety that hints at redemption beyond any cold philosophising.

The only weak moment occurs in track two -''Darkest Birds'' - where Sylvian takes a step too far into his more rockist back pages. It only jars because the rest of Snow Borne Sorrow is a delicately poised document, filled with rare wonders. --Chris Jones

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S on 24 Jan. 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'll keep this short. This album compares extremely favourably with the very best of David Sylvian's work; I know that some will feel that this could even be his best. And they could be right.
Beautiful and haunting, sparkling, dark and pristine, heavenly on the ear; melancholic and uplifting both musically and lyrically. (I wish the lyrics were included in the cd packaging - some of it verges on the poetic). The production is perfect too.
I have already listened to this album many-a-time and I know that this is one Sylvian album that I will continue to revisit. Yes, it's much more immediate than his recent excursions, and I hope that this album could even introduce him and his collaborators to a new audience, but it wont.
It's a small comfort to know that on this planet of philistines there are still a few alchemists out there who still believe in magic.
That's it. What more do you need to know? Oh yeah, it's cheaper than a Coldplay album, God help us.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By P. Irvine on 27 Jun. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Having been disappointed by the Good Son remix album and I was worried that this might also be a case of a lot of less talented people trampling over David's talent, I guess I shouldn't have really worried though as he has always been brilliant at picking collaborators in the past like Jon Hassell, Robert Fripp and Holger Czukay and here he does it again. This music is beatiful and deep, there are no stand out songs because they're all classics. I was a bit unsure about the idea of him working with electonica artist at first but the sound perfectly compliments his voice which is on top form and now I am a total convert, in fact I've even started exploring electronica as a result and bought albums by Boards of Canada and Marconi Union among others! Apparently this is intended to be a one-off record which is a terrible shame as it would be great to hear how Nine Horses would develop and unlike the Good Son shows how working with the right collaborators really adds a lot to his music. Snow Borne Sorrow is definitely David's best album since Secrets of the Beehive.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alexander1001 on 30 Oct. 2005
Format: Audio CD
A tender album with frontman David Sylvian being a wonderfull lyricist, a bard of the 21st. century.
Good catchy pop songs with touches of jazz, electronica and some soul spices.
It is a very thorough production giving space for many well acclaimed musicians to contribute there skills; R. Sakamoto, Arve Henriksen, Theo Travis, Keith Lowe to just mention some, but all are up to that standard.
The lyrics are content, introspective, beautyfull and stirring, and foremost excellent.
A long anticipated album, that rewards richly for the stretch (huge) of many peoples patience.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By DBT on 3 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Having been a huge fan of Sylvians through the eighties and early nineties, I have found his subsequent work increasingly obscure, inaccessible and frustrating; culminating in the aural pap that was 'Blemish'. I resigned myself to the fact that my love affair with Sylvian was over and prepared to move on, alone, into a world populated with popularism.
Oh joy; he's back. This is a staggering return to form. For anyone out there who remembers 'Secrets of the Beehive' or 'Gone to Earth' the news is good. Songs are back, instrumentation is tight and well crafted and with this offering, I get the sense that Sylvian is offering work to his fans, for his fans, rather than the introspective twiddlings and sparsities which have typified his more recent work. In a current landscape that celebrates the banal, the fast buck, the one shot in the dark and subsequent obscurity, this is a Mecca of a recording; something I have had a secret hope and longing for which, against all odds, has materialised.
I won't go on about each song, draw idle comparisons, wax too lyrically over each tone and nuance: all I will say is that if you remember Sylvian, and remember all you thought he stood for which was lost along the way, this is an absolute must for you. God, it's beautiful... It's been a long time coming, but worth it...
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan James Romley on 20 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD
I'm not as ardent a devotee of Sylvian's work as some of the previous commentators, finding much of his work a bit bland and sterile. The only album of his that I've truly adored is 1987's Secrets of the Beehive, which felt like a complete piece of work, and featured some of his strongest songwriting to date. His last solo offering, Blemish, had some great moments, but for the most part, I just couldn't get past Derek Bailey's awful improvised guitar work or that feeling of meandering excess. Fear that Nine Horses, his new project with Steve Jansen and Burnt Friedman, would be more of the same can be laid to rest during that gorgeous opening track, Wonderful World, which effortlessly blends elements of jazz, pop and ambient trip-hop to sublime effect, capturing a hazy and wavering sense of dulled melancholy that will continue throughout the album.
For me, this is really the best thing Sylvian has done since Beehive, managing to push the musical boundaries in terms of production and arrangement, but also remembering to include some sweet melodies and the occasional hook. It's also an album that holds together exceedingly well, with each of the songs building to a collective momentum, with no sign of filler or fodder getting in the way of the greats... which is really the whole album!!
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