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Smart Swarm: Using Animal Behaviour to Organise Our World Hardcover – 5 Aug 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Collins (5 Aug 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007279906
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007279906
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 480,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

‘Smart Swarm blends zoology, entertaining anecdotes and conceptual discussion in an approachable and insightful way.’ – New Scientist

‘‘Smart Swarm blends zoology, entertaining anecdotes and conceptual discussion in an approachable and insightful way.’ – New Scientist

‘There have been other recent books about swarm intelligence, and the wisdom of crowds, but Miller's book is the sharpest, most readably intelligent guided tour of current thinking and research about collective intelligence and nature's basic collaborations.’ – Iain Finlayson, The Times

‘Peter Miller gives us a lively account of how studying the collective habits, actions and instincts of animals in the wild means that we can apply these strategies to organising and communicating in our own world. – The Times, Eureka

‘I loved The Smart Swarm. It's been a while since I was this stimulated by a book, or saw so many practical applications. And what a great read' – Don Tapscott, author of Wikinomics

There have been other recent books about swarm intelligence, and the wisdom of crowds, but Miller's exploration of the insect hive mind is fascinating enough, but his real interest is in the way humans can harness this phenomenon to structure businesses.’ – BBC Focus

‘It all makes for a fascinating read, not least for the insight Miller provides into the arcane workings of the animal kingdom. The book also raises interesting questions about our own behaviour and what it takes for us to work for a common goal.’ – BA Business Life

About the Author

Peter Miller has been a writer and senior editor at National Geographic for over twenty-five years. He lives with his wife PJ in Reston, Virginia.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By E. L. Wisty TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Jan 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If this book sees any further, as Bernard of Chartres said, it is because it stands on the shoulders of giants. The basic ideas underlying this book, of networks and communications across them, have already been done so much better in so many earlier classic works, such as The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few, and Linked: How Everything is Connected to Everything Else and What it Means for Business and Everyday Life and so on and so forth, which works this book indeed often references.

The connections between the described animal behaviours (although often extremely fascinating in themselves) and human behaviours are often tenuous at best. Sadly Tapscott is not a great communicator and I found it extremely difficult to follow his descriptions. This book is a real case in point of where a picture would be able to tell a thousand words, but no diagrams are forthcoming. In short, if you are interested in this kind of analysis of human behaviour, start with some of the above mentioned works instead.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Karura VINE VOICE on 28 Dec 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In the animal kingdom, there are many examples of groups working together for the greater good, and in this book, Peter Miller covers a number of different examples. From bees choosing a new hive to termites repairing their mound, each chapter explains how individuals can come together to form units in a super-organism.

Given that one of the academics in my former research group works in the field of complexity science, with an emphasis on the critical behaviour of ant colonies, I thought it would be interesting to see what this book had to say on the subject. Of course, this is an introductory book rather than a technical or mathematical text, but there is still plenty of good material. It's questionable as to whether the book really fulfils its selling point of teaching cooperative tactics that can be used in the boardroom, but in all honesty, this doesn't matter - it's still filled with interesting facts and observations about how various different species of animals have evolved various systems of cooperation.

Unfortunately, the writing style is not always as coherent as it could be, and there are points where this obscures the point the author is making - for example, during the bee chapter, the explanation of how the hive chooses a new location is not only somewhat confusing, but appears to contradict itself later in the chapter. It's passages like these that make the book less useful than it could have been if it had just had a bit more clarity.

Overall, while not quite as good as it could have been, this is a decent enough introductory book on the subject. You may not want it to keep it on your shelf forever, but if you're interested in the subject, it's worth reading at least once.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martin Turner HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Feb 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a book about how the lessons of organisation from ants, bees and birds (among others) can be applied to the questions of organisation among humans. It is written in a journalistic rather than scientific style and, although fascinating in terms of the insights it gives into hive life, flock behaviour and the extraordinary behaviour of termite colonies, it is not always clear how exactly these lessons can be applied.

The keystone of the book is that distributed intelligence can work among largely unintelligent organisms with very short memories by exploiting positional information, and each organism responding to its near neighbours. Birds in a flock, for example, can act as a super organism as each bird responds only to six or seven of its near neighbours. Honey bees can pseudo-democratically determine the best choice of hive location by the extent to which bees 'lobby' for their choice, and the extent to which other bees fall in with this. While no single entity controls or understands what is happening, the overall decision making process can produce highly optimal results.

The use of computer software 'agents' which follow simple rules is shown in Smart Swarm to be a highly useful programming tool which can solve problems in linear regression, such as choosing the best combination of flights and holiday resorts, far more efficiently than traditional methods. However, the applications to local democracy in Vermont, described in detail, are a little more far-fetched, and it's difficult to see how these things are 'like' the smart swarms in nature, except by analogy and metaphor.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A John TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Dec 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a book about social behaviour - looking at the research into the behaviour of ants, honeybees, termites and starlings and showing how this can be used to improve systems, and to understand some human behaviour.

I really enjoyed reading this. It was fascinating to read about how the insects and birds coordinated their behaviour, and how this knowledge can help both business, and understanding how humans behave. While we may often act as individuals, our behaviour in a crowd can be remarkably similar to that of starlings, for example. I also found myself drawing my own parallels. Our human tendency is often to go with the "popular" route, and I found myself considering how this could lead to a single error starting a domino effect in others.

I would describe the book as falling into the "popular psychology" category. It's an interesting read, and one which can spark ideas. It's also easy to read, so if, like me, you are the kind of person who loves documentaries, this makes a good book to curl up with on the sofa.
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