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Smallcreep's Day Mass Market Paperback – 1968

12 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 189 pages
  • Publisher: Panther (1968)
  • ASIN: B0000CO5AZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,150,925 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Currell Brown wrote Smallcreep's Day while working in a Gloucestershire factory. Its success enabled him give up factory work and realise his dream of setting up a craft pottery in rural Gloucestershire. Since then he has been involved in a series of craft enterprises in various parts of the country. He now lives and works in woodlands near Sherwood Forest making spinning-wheels for enthusiasts and museums.

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Review

'A most lucidly written nightmare, and a pleasure to read for its prose alone... Apocalyptic. But funny with it.' -- John Bowden, Sunday Times --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Peter Currell Brown wrote Smallcreep's Day while working in a Gloucestershire factory. Its success enabled him give up factory work and realise his dream of setting up a craft pottery in rural Gloucestershire. Since then he has been involved in a series of craft enterprises in various parts of the country. He now lives and works in woodlands near Sherwood Forest making spinning-wheels for enthusiasts and museums. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By MARTIN (WOOD GREEN) on 14 May 2002
Format: Paperback
Any spiritually-minded person that has had experience of tedious factory work will relate to this book.
Smallcreep is slightly obsequious worker who knows his rank and place in this huge foundry gives a fascinating commentary . On a quest for the General Parts Stores as he drifts through the workshops and offices which are full of weird surreal characters and machinery you get feelings of absolute loneliness, despair and isolation. Not only is the book damning of factory life and mindless people it also attacks the hum-drum banality of everyday life, consumerism and politics. You are given the impression that the factory is actually portrayed as the tedious circle of life in which we live and Smallcreep's eventual return to his machine after the round tour demonstrates this, the last few pages scream in desperation at the despicable tedium mankind has created for himself.
It appears that this novel was one-off by the author who has obviously written from experience, the sleeve says that he gave up factory work entirely and runs his own pottery.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By MARTIN (WOOD GREEN) on 13 May 2002
Format: Paperback
I have just re-read this novel after twenty-two years and wonder why I left it for so long.
This book is a strange and surreal commentary as factory worker Pinquean Smallcreep doing a mundane repetetive job as a machine operator attempts to discover what goes on elswhere in his place of work and getting into some very odd situations as a result. This book has a very misanthropic view on the entire structure of 1970's industrial relations, people, and life itself. The storyline would make an excellent art-house film.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Preece on 9 Sept. 2008
Format: Paperback
Full marks to Pinter & Martin for republishing this long-unavailable classic. Smallcreep's surreal journey through the inside of a factory is gripping, highly imaginative, and bizarre. Brown worked in R A Lister's engineering works in Dursley when he wrote this book; at one time the factory employed over 4000 but is now much reduced. Curiously, J K Rowling named Harry Potter's boring uncle 'Dursley'. She never knew that it had already inspired Brown's 1960s masterpiece. Brown never wrote another book: he never felt he had to.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. BRADY-JACOBS on 12 Feb. 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read this in the Picador version, but lent it out so many times that it went missing. It took years to find another version, this the original panther print, and it does not dissapoint, even from this distance in time. The story concerns the quest of a 'small man', working on the conveyor belt of a vast factory, who sets out one day with a packet of sandwiches, to find out what he makes. His phantasmagoric adventures recall Bunyan, Pynchon or Brautigan, with a dash of a strong working-mans experience of politics thrown in. From the stygian depths of this epic structure to the almost paradisical office life far far above, he fixes all aspects of the factory life with an hallucinatory eye, and the end, as he discovers the results of his lifes work is well worth the journey.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Les carbonnades flamandes on 12 July 2012
Format: Paperback
I have the old Panther paperback from 40-odd years ago, and I read it every two or three years. I always relish the factory atmosphere and culture, while usually skipping the scatology. This is a good example of the rebirth of surrealism in Britain in the 1960s, short-lived though it was. Well worth a read. Smallcreep's factory takes me back 42 years, when I watched a chap on an Ohio broaching machine, cutting gears for Bristol buses; he'd hung a row of different-sized gears on wires above his machine, and, for a cigarette, would take a peen hammer and play
"A Double Diamond Works Wonders, So Drink One Today." Only in England, eh?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 10 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book when it was first published and was reminded of it recently, so I sought out a copy. It is far darker and more surreal than I remembered, and better!

I have worked in various machine shops and factories and there were so many resonances and strange memories that I found it quite draining to read, and had to read it in small 'sips'. A total once in a lifetime book, the only book I can compare it to is 'The third Policeman' which is nothing like it, but somehow equally wonderful.
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