Slade

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At a Glance

Formed: 1969 (45 years ago)


Biography

One of Britain’s most popular and enduring bands, Slade exuded pure unadulterated fun. Lauded by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Alice Cooper and Ritchie Blackmore among other luminaries, they’ve been described as “the missing link between the Beatles and Oasis” – the latter, of course, having covered Cum On Feel The Noize and Merry Xmas Everybody.
After slogging it out in the ‘60s as the N’Betweens and later, Ambrose Slade, Slade finally came to prominence with their frenetic rave-up of Little Richard’s Get Down And Get With It. In an age of so many silver-sequinned acts, Slade ... Read more

One of Britain’s most popular and enduring bands, Slade exuded pure unadulterated fun. Lauded by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Alice Cooper and Ritchie Blackmore among other luminaries, they’ve been described as “the missing link between the Beatles and Oasis” – the latter, of course, having covered Cum On Feel The Noize and Merry Xmas Everybody.
After slogging it out in the ‘60s as the N’Betweens and later, Ambrose Slade, Slade finally came to prominence with their frenetic rave-up of Little Richard’s Get Down And Get With It. In an age of so many silver-sequinned acts, Slade steamrolled the competition, scoring six No. 1s, twelve Top 5 singles and three No. 1 LPs between 1971 and 1975.
The writing partnership of Noddy Holder (lyrics) and Jim Lea (music) was unstoppable. They crafted a pantheon of ultra-catchy, supersonic nuggets whose infectious singalong choruses imbedded themselves in your brain – a treasure trove of hit singles that are among the most impressive in rock history.
Image-wise, Slade were in a league of their own. Unlike some of their glam/glitter contemporaries, they dressed flashy but did it with a playful wink. While Jim Lea and Don Powell kept a relatively low fashion profile, Noddy and Dave revelled in the delicious absurdity of it all. With luxurious strawberry blonde mutton chops tightly framing his face, Noddy strode around the stage like a mischievous schoolboy spitting out the lyrics with cheeky irreverence. Dave was a cartoon character come to life, like a friendlier version of the Tasmanian Devil, a goofy grin permanently in place. Strutting precariously atop knee-high platform boots, Hill was an unforgettable vision of glitter and glitz, his splendidly designed ‘Super Yob’ guitar a perfect accoutrement.
Expertly managed by ex-Animals bassist Chas Chandler, Slade were one rock’s most successful, yet underrated outfits, who displayed their experimental streak on terrific albums like Slayed?, Old New Borrowed And Blue and Nobody’s Fools. Slade concerts were fist-pumping, banner-waving rituals, a remarkable union of audience and band. And their 1975 feature film Slade In Flame was a landmark cinematic achievement, a dark realistically gritty and violent tale rightly lauded today as one of the most accomplished rock movies of all time.
After a wildly successful 25-year career, Slade called it quits in April 1991, performing for the last time at a 25th anniversary party in Noddy’s home town of Walsall in the West Midlands. Perhaps the real secret behind their massive success is that they had as much fun as their audience. Never pretentious or inclined to take themselves too seriously, the joyous nature of Slade’s music is truly contagious, their spirit boundless. Long may we feel their noise!

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

One of Britain’s most popular and enduring bands, Slade exuded pure unadulterated fun. Lauded by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Alice Cooper and Ritchie Blackmore among other luminaries, they’ve been described as “the missing link between the Beatles and Oasis” – the latter, of course, having covered Cum On Feel The Noize and Merry Xmas Everybody.
After slogging it out in the ‘60s as the N’Betweens and later, Ambrose Slade, Slade finally came to prominence with their frenetic rave-up of Little Richard’s Get Down And Get With It. In an age of so many silver-sequinned acts, Slade steamrolled the competition, scoring six No. 1s, twelve Top 5 singles and three No. 1 LPs between 1971 and 1975.
The writing partnership of Noddy Holder (lyrics) and Jim Lea (music) was unstoppable. They crafted a pantheon of ultra-catchy, supersonic nuggets whose infectious singalong choruses imbedded themselves in your brain – a treasure trove of hit singles that are among the most impressive in rock history.
Image-wise, Slade were in a league of their own. Unlike some of their glam/glitter contemporaries, they dressed flashy but did it with a playful wink. While Jim Lea and Don Powell kept a relatively low fashion profile, Noddy and Dave revelled in the delicious absurdity of it all. With luxurious strawberry blonde mutton chops tightly framing his face, Noddy strode around the stage like a mischievous schoolboy spitting out the lyrics with cheeky irreverence. Dave was a cartoon character come to life, like a friendlier version of the Tasmanian Devil, a goofy grin permanently in place. Strutting precariously atop knee-high platform boots, Hill was an unforgettable vision of glitter and glitz, his splendidly designed ‘Super Yob’ guitar a perfect accoutrement.
Expertly managed by ex-Animals bassist Chas Chandler, Slade were one rock’s most successful, yet underrated outfits, who displayed their experimental streak on terrific albums like Slayed?, Old New Borrowed And Blue and Nobody’s Fools. Slade concerts were fist-pumping, banner-waving rituals, a remarkable union of audience and band. And their 1975 feature film Slade In Flame was a landmark cinematic achievement, a dark realistically gritty and violent tale rightly lauded today as one of the most accomplished rock movies of all time.
After a wildly successful 25-year career, Slade called it quits in April 1991, performing for the last time at a 25th anniversary party in Noddy’s home town of Walsall in the West Midlands. Perhaps the real secret behind their massive success is that they had as much fun as their audience. Never pretentious or inclined to take themselves too seriously, the joyous nature of Slade’s music is truly contagious, their spirit boundless. Long may we feel their noise!

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

One of Britain’s most popular and enduring bands, Slade exuded pure unadulterated fun. Lauded by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Alice Cooper and Ritchie Blackmore among other luminaries, they’ve been described as “the missing link between the Beatles and Oasis” – the latter, of course, having covered Cum On Feel The Noize and Merry Xmas Everybody.
After slogging it out in the ‘60s as the N’Betweens and later, Ambrose Slade, Slade finally came to prominence with their frenetic rave-up of Little Richard’s Get Down And Get With It. In an age of so many silver-sequinned acts, Slade steamrolled the competition, scoring six No. 1s, twelve Top 5 singles and three No. 1 LPs between 1971 and 1975.
The writing partnership of Noddy Holder (lyrics) and Jim Lea (music) was unstoppable. They crafted a pantheon of ultra-catchy, supersonic nuggets whose infectious singalong choruses imbedded themselves in your brain – a treasure trove of hit singles that are among the most impressive in rock history.
Image-wise, Slade were in a league of their own. Unlike some of their glam/glitter contemporaries, they dressed flashy but did it with a playful wink. While Jim Lea and Don Powell kept a relatively low fashion profile, Noddy and Dave revelled in the delicious absurdity of it all. With luxurious strawberry blonde mutton chops tightly framing his face, Noddy strode around the stage like a mischievous schoolboy spitting out the lyrics with cheeky irreverence. Dave was a cartoon character come to life, like a friendlier version of the Tasmanian Devil, a goofy grin permanently in place. Strutting precariously atop knee-high platform boots, Hill was an unforgettable vision of glitter and glitz, his splendidly designed ‘Super Yob’ guitar a perfect accoutrement.
Expertly managed by ex-Animals bassist Chas Chandler, Slade were one rock’s most successful, yet underrated outfits, who displayed their experimental streak on terrific albums like Slayed?, Old New Borrowed And Blue and Nobody’s Fools. Slade concerts were fist-pumping, banner-waving rituals, a remarkable union of audience and band. And their 1975 feature film Slade In Flame was a landmark cinematic achievement, a dark realistically gritty and violent tale rightly lauded today as one of the most accomplished rock movies of all time.
After a wildly successful 25-year career, Slade called it quits in April 1991, performing for the last time at a 25th anniversary party in Noddy’s home town of Walsall in the West Midlands. Perhaps the real secret behind their massive success is that they had as much fun as their audience. Never pretentious or inclined to take themselves too seriously, the joyous nature of Slade’s music is truly contagious, their spirit boundless. Long may we feel their noise!

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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