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Hi ,having had my skywatcher 130 m for only a short while I,ve found it to be a fantastic starter telescope and the supplied lenses are very good. Setting up was quite simple and I had also bought some extra lenses and moon filter.I live out in the French countryside so there is no light pollution here,I also bought "Turn left at Orion" which has helped greatly so you can see the type of image you should get rather than the Hubble telescope type images.Hope this helps.
22 Oct 2014 by Mr D. Savin
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Negative, Mr. Campbell. The equipment I bought came without motors or control panel. And I'm very happy with it. You can buy these items in separate or you can also buy the same telescope with these items already included, for an additional cost. Just look around here. Wishing you good stargazing nights. Regards. Joaquim
10 Dec 2014 by Joaquim Abreu
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Yes http://www.firstlightoptics.com/finders/skywatcher-9x50-right-angled-erecting-finderscope.html :-)
19 Sep 2014 by MR T MARTIN
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The obvious diference is the length of the tube which gives the 900mm higher magnification. The real difference is in the mirrors: the parabollic mirror is a more complex shape which allows the observer to view a target with minimum distortion. As an example: if you were to look at a starfield with the conventional mirror, the stars at the centre would be in focus and circular pin-points of light but those towards the outermost visible areas would be slightly stretched away from the centre. This effect (spherical aberation!) is almost completely erradicated with the parabolic mirror. If you wish to use the 'scope primarily for planetary observation the 900mm tube gives greater magnification but the 650mm gives a larger field of view and is better suited to general astronomy and possibly imaging (astro-photography: you would need to invest in motor-drives etc though!) Both 'scopes are excellent "beginners" telescopes and, if used as such, you might want to add a reference book, a Philips Plannisphere and a red LED headlight/torch. A subscription to the BBC "Sky at Night" magazine/website can provide much support and keep you abrest of the latest developements! The general concensus of Newtonian 'scope users is that the parabolic mirror is better for all-round observation: hope this helps. George F
5 Dec 2014 by J. G. Futers
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Yes. But it does not come motor drives. Hope this helps.
12 Apr 2015 by MR S Campbell
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Yes, you will need a T-ring adaptor. Sold on here for around £10 or £30 with a 2xbarlow lens.
1 Nov 2014 by flashleg8
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The tube, mount, tripod, plus a red dot viewfinder and a couple of lenses (a standard and a wide angle).
17 May 2014 by patashnik
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No, you'd have to get one separately.
17 May 2014 by patashnik
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