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Sixty Nine


Price: £34.77
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Dispatched from and sold by rbmbooks.
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£34.77 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by rbmbooks.

Amazon's Cloud 69 Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (22 Mar. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rough Trade
  • ASIN: B00001ZT9W
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 349,906 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Crazy Blue
2. Suicide Kiss
3. Baby Milk Snatcher
4. Scab
5. Sulliday
6. Dizzy
7. Spermwhale Trip Over
8. The Sun Falls Into The Sea
9. The Madonna Is With Child
10. Spanish Quay (3)

Product Description

*

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 April 2001
Format: Audio CD
Steve Sutherland, then writing for the Melody Maker, included A.R. Kane's "69", as an esoteric musical experience he termed "oceanic". He described the sense of joy one can feel in our recollections of the state of "heaven on earth" experienced in earliest childhood/infancy;not recalling actual events in time and space, but perceptions of the world informed by inner joy. Sutherland cited the Cocteau Twins and Hendrix's "1983,a merman..." as other examples, blissful and evocative if acquired. This struck a chord personally, as it was something I had experienced with the Cocteau's and finally, after initial doubt, with A.R.Kane's "69". Oblique "Joycean" wordplay, but most importantly, the astute mix of faraway melody, studio effect and white noise make this album such a brilliant example of the "oceanic" experience; structurally it is clearly influenced diversely(My Bloody Valentine, Cocteau Twins and Dub Reggae). There are no compromises here for commercial considerations(to some extent sadly conceded to on their follow-up, "i"), a reverie may be entered into, but it's serenity may be edged with cutting, searing aural velocity and on one track("sulliday"), simply creative feedback, but a track that contrasts so effectively with the beautiful simplicity of the preceding "scab". The high-point of the album is really from "spermwhale..." through the heartbreaking majesty of "the sun falls..." and onward... I would beg the listener to persevere with this, or any seemingly inaccessible music which nevertheless seems to hint initially at a deeper level;joy can remain in the heart, but may need rediscovering;I found this to be the case and Steve Sutherland's explanation to be profoundly true,but there can be no mass marketing for such inner life(well, let them laugh,the fools...!)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Jan. 2005
Format: Audio CD
It is not difficult to understand why AR Kane's brand of pop failed to ignite the charts on its 1988 release. Despite its pop leanings, the songs on this album are ostensibly structureless, with the sweet soulful vocals drifting in and out of focus. It certainly predates much of the shoegazing and postrock that captured the music public's imagination several years later. Notable references would be to Jesus and the Mary Chain, Cocteau Twins and some My Bloody Valentine but AR Kane is also made distinct by employing dub and reggae techniques mixed with the loose funkiness of some Can records. Tracks like 'Spermwhale trip over' employ masses of reverb and drum machine effects that were rightly termed 'Oceanic', while 'Suicide kiss' hits you with waves of percussive assaults. Some of the album is a tad impenetrable and unfocussed, but it is an interesting discovery from an unlikely period in contemporary music.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Nov. 2000
Format: Audio CD
It may be a little known fact to many but the members of A R Kane have enjoyed a number one hit when they teamed up with fellow 'no-hopers' (in the commercial sense) Colourbox as M/A/R/R/S with the 1987 hit 'Pump Up The Volume' which makes them one-hit wonders. But A R Kane's future successes were only in the alternative charts and they don't come much more alternative than these two albums. Their sound was an odd mixture of early Cocteau Twins like production (cavernous bass, dub soundscapes) with soulful vocals. The first album is sparse sounding and has a haunting quality to it; it's sole excursion into pop being 'Crazy Blue' but even that sounds too mysterious for the charts.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
oceanic 31 Mar. 2001
By M Y Spencer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Steve Sutherland, then writing for the Melody Maker, included A.R. Kane's "69", as an esoteric musical experience he termed "oceanic". He described the sense of joy one can feel in our recollections of the state of "heaven on earth" experienced in earliest childhood/infancy; not recalling actual events in time and space, but perceptions of the world informed by inner joy. Sutherland cited the Cocteau Twins and Hendrix's "1983, a merman...",as blissful and evocative if acquired. This struck a chord personally, as it was something I had experienced with the Cocteau's and finally, after initial doubt, with A.R. Kane's "69". Obique "Joycean" wordplay, but most importantly, the astute mix of faraway melody, studio effect and white noise make this album such a brilliant example of the "oceanic" experience; structurally it is clearly influenced diversely (My Bloody Valentine, Cocteau Twins and Dub Reggae). There are no compromises here for commercial considerations (to some extent sadly conceded to on their follow-up, "i"), a reverie may be entered into, but it's serenity may be edged with cutting, searing aural velocity, and on one track ("sulliday"), simply creative feedback, but a track that contrasts so effectively with the beautiful simplicity of the preceding "scab". The high-point of the album is really from "spermwhale...", through the heartbreaking majesty of "the sun falls..." and onward... I would beg the listener to persevere with this, or any seemingly inaccessible music which nevertheless seems to hint initially at a deeper level;joy can remain in the heart, but may need rediscovering; I found this to be the case and Steve Sutherland's explanation to be profoundly true, but there can be no mass marketing for such inner life (well, let them laugh,the fools...!)
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Excellent album from a forgotten band 29 Jan. 2001
By Matt H. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
69, released by A.R. Kane in the late 80s on Rough Trade, is an excellent album from a band that no one mentions anymore. Here is what I hear: There is a very loose quality to the music, a lack of obvious structure, that sometimes makes the songs sound like they are teetering between poppiness and falling apart. A.R. Kane employs guitar noises reminiscent of early Jesus and Mary Chain and act almost as a stepping stone between J&M Chain and more polished shoe-gazer bands like My Bloody Valentine, prefiguring also long-form drone music by groups like Windy & Carl. At the same time, they definitely have something of their own going on, and it's hard to classify them as one thing or another. "69" is a really interesting album that grew on me very quickly. Check it out and spread the word.
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