or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Sinfonia, Eindrucke

Pierre Boulez Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £7.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Pierre Boulez Store

Music

Image of album by Pierre Boulez

Photos

Image of Pierre Boulez

Biography

PIERRE BOULEZ – A BIOGRAPHICAL TIMELINE
“. . . the great artist Pierre Boulez is making more relaxed and more sovereign music than ever before.”
Die Zeit, Hamburg
Pierre Boulez was born in 1925 in Montbrison, France. He first studied mathematics, then music at the Paris Conservatory, where his teachers included Olivier Messiaen and René Leibowitz. In 1954, ... Read more in Amazon's Pierre Boulez Store

Visit Amazon's Pierre Boulez Store
for 169 albums, 9 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Sinfonia, Eindrucke + Cathy Berberian Sings Berio and Weill + Berio - Coro
Price For All Three: £20.69

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Performer: New Swingle Singers
  • Orchestra: Orchestre National de France
  • Conductor: Ward Swingle, Pierre Boulez
  • Composer: Luciano Berio
  • Audio CD (25 Jun 2001)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Apex
  • ASIN: B00005OBR8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 56,187 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Berio : Sinfonia : I
2. "Berio : Sinfonia : II ""O King"""
3. Berio : Sinfonia : III In ruhig fliessender Bewegung
4. Berio : Sinfonia : IV
5. Berio : Sinfonia : V
6. Berio : Eindrücke

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sixties masterpiece 29 July 2003
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
This is the great classical work of the nineteen sixties: an exuberant collage of bits and pieces by other composers superimposed on a movement from a Mahler symphony. It’s the moment when all Berio’s experience and experiments came together for the first time to make a masterpiece that speaks to the widest audience (and not just classical fans). It’s a typically (for Berio) multi-layered work, encompassing exciting orchestral virtuosity, politics, singing, death (there is a moving lament for Martin Luther King) and, above all, sheer energy and fun.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By david
Format:Audio CD
Having just returned from a great concert at the Festival Hall London with this piece by the Sao Paulo Orchestra on tour under Marin Alsop with the latest grouping of the redoubtable Swingle Singers, I returned - yet again, I am a child of the Sixties being aged 9 to 18 through that decade - anyway, to this very special disc in the original ERATO release, I must say thank you Mr Boulez, as on the record, and all the other reviewers who mainly think this is a top ten recording. The playfulness, rage and protest (yes it occupies a special boiling point in that decade in the aftermath of the Paris student riotswhere it was composed) but sheer toppsy turvey chic and flair of those years is all there. "Keep going going"...yes, to the thousands in Brazil and elsewhere round the world who were to be hunted down and murdered by the henchman in various fascist regimes and military dictatorships round the world sponsored by the USA. It's a fun piece, but the underlying meaning is deadly subversive and triumphant! Or is it a reminder that those dark days have never gone away?

I think this performance is there, centred in the heart of the music. I can imagine more driven performances, but I really love clarity and focus. So this is great. Also authentic...given the performers.

The sound on this disc is absolutely fabulous. Each voice and instrument is accurately pinpointed - more than one can say in the dreadful acoustic of the Festival Hall (and I was in a £50 seat). For an early digital disc some miracle happened here, which defies explanation, especially when you consider some of the stinkers turned out by Erato and Radio France over the years.

The Sinfonia was dedicated to Leonard Bernstein, a very representative figure of the 1960s, and his student, Marin Alsop gave London a great performance coupling it with Lenny's Symphonic Dances from West Side Story. But it was the Berio that stole the show!

GET IT, GET, GET IT! PLEASE.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  13 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Berio's masterpiece and another fine work, but get the budget reissue, and supplement it with Eotvos 21 Jan 2007
By Christopher Culver - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This disc of two Luciano Berio works in performance by the Orchestre National de France and Pierre Boulez was originally released on Erato in 1986. Thankfully, Warner Classics reissued it at budget price in 2001 in their "Apex" line, a bargain which the contemporary music afficionado should seek out. As you shall see, I do not think this disc has the best performance of a key Berio work, but nonetheless it has much to recommend itself.

"Sinfonia" for eight voices and orchestra (1968-69) is one of Luciano Berio's greatest works, vast in its proportions and in the musical traditions it incorporates. The eight voices are meant to be jazz singers, and Berio wrote the piece for the Swingle Singers, who appear here in a later lineup. The first two movements are quiet and mysterious. In the first, the singers gently intone selections from Levi-Strauss' retellings of Brazilian myths, made so vague that only the phonetic properties matter. In the second movement "O King", an orchestration of an earlier independent work, the singers slowly build up to the name "Martin Luther King", who had been murdered the year before.

The third movement of "Sinfonia", the extroverted "In ruhig fliessender Bewegung", is the most famous. The skeleton of the work is the second movement from Mahler's "Resurrection" symphony, a little cut-up and reordered. Over this, Berio has a tenor reciting text taken mainly from Samuel Beckett's "The Unnamable" and Berio's own journalistic writings, and the orchestra responds with quotations from fifteen composers. For example, when the narrator uses the term "the lowing cattle, the rush of the stream", we hear part of Beethoven's "Pastorale" symphony, while a singer's cry "This is nothing but an academic exercise" is ironically accompanied by music by Hindemith. Every listener has his own favourite part of this movement, mine is when the narrator says "I have a present for you" and the orchestra responds with that big tutti chord that opens Boulez' "Don" (which is to say "Gift").

The fourth and fifth movements return to a subdued tone. The fourth brings back Levi-Strauss references and is rather brief. But for all my initial passion about the third movement, I find it is the fifth which is the most intriguing and satisfying. Originally "Sinfonia" was written in four movements, but after the first performance, Berio was unhappy that these four movements were not reconciled to each other. In the fifth movement he subsequently wrote, therefore, we hear references in the form of quotation and harmonic development to the original four movements, a savage mix of voices, confused percussion, and threatening trombones a la Per Norgard's fifth symphony. A splendid end to a massive work.

For a long time, this was *the* recording of the "Sinfonia" to have. However, I must say I find it superseded by that on Deutsche Grammophon in the "20/21" series, where Peter Eotvos leads the Goteborgs Symfoniker. In the third movement, Eotvos keeps it going at a very nice clip, creating a dizzying parade of images. Boulez, on the other hand, keeps things quite slow; if one has already heard the Eotvos recording, terms like "molasses" come to mind. Also, Ward Swingle's narration, while it might have worked for Berio in forty years ago, now makes this sound like a dated '60s happening, and the Eotvos performance Nonetheless, Boulez's handling of the other four movements is quite fine, and I certainly invite Berio fans to get this.

The liner notes for "Sinfonia" consist only of Luciano Berio's own programme note, which covers all the basics. However, those enraptured by the piece would do well to seek out David Osmond-Smith's PLAYING ON WORDS: A Guide to Luciano Berio's 'Sinfonia' (University of Chicago, 1987) ISBN 0947854002.

Even if the performance of "Sinfonia" is not my favourite, the following "Eindrucke" for orchestra (1973-74) is very entertaining. Where does one go after one has reconciled himself to the whole classical tradition, giving birth to the first postmodern symphony? Evidentally back to modernism, but of a fresh new type. "Eindrucke" is a quintessential 1970s Berio piece, interested in organically generating material from strict processes, while still remaining dramatic and easily accessible..

I should add that this is an IRCAM recording, meaning that these two works appear in crystal-clear sound. Bottom line: get the Eotvos recording and this, and enjoy a thrilling tour de force of the 20th-century music.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic 5 April 2004
By Prescott Cunningham Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Luciano Berio was commissioned to write a work for the New York Philharmonic's 150th anniversary. What resulted was the Sinfonia, a masterpiece of the twentieth century musical movement. This work combines many of the Italian composers fascinations - from Mahler to Martin Luther King - and sympathizes them. The result is fascinating, stimulating, and thoroughly enjoyable. Boulez's interpretation is really top-notch. He leads the orchestra with great power, gusto, and energy. This vision is evident, especially in the third moment of the piece. Berio here takes the Scherzo from Mahler's second symphony and "pastes" in other famous musical phrases from Debussy, Ravel, Beethoven, Schoenberg and others as well as adding voices, which sustain a dialog throughout the entire movement. Boulez's intellectual approach to music is appreciated here - the result is a crisp, definitive reading of this powerful twentieth century masterpiece.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful sound, quality; a perfect recording. 27 Feb 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is Berio most famous work for orchestra and its complexity and modern style makes it a perfect work for Pierre Boulez to conduct. He gives this complex work light and makes full use of Berio's unique orchestral sounds and allows the singers to shine through the musical fabric. In this recording, the orchestra is beautiful, the singers and narrator are clearly heard, and the tempos are graceful, yet controled. One thing to note about the third movement of the Sinfonia is Berio's references to other famous works. It is fun to listen to the music and mind the hidden, famous fragments of other scores. In the third movement you will hear Mahler's 2nd Symphony, Debussy's La Mer, Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony, and Strauss Night of the Rose to name a few. It is an amazing work. BUY THIS CD!
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ricardo Chailly and the Concertgebouw 22 Jun 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If you are a fan of this great piece and haven't heard the (out of print) recording by Ricardo Chailly and the Concertgebouw -- buy it used, now: Polygram Records, #425832. It has all of the clarity and insight of this Boulez performance, but it also has great big dollops of humor, passion, wonder, mystery, etc.; it lets go. It also includes Berio's late orchestral masterpiece, "Formazione", as well as the chamber orchestra version of the "Folksongs" wonderfully sung by Jard Van Nes. The greatest Berio CD -- program, performance -- I know of.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Berio's masterpiece and another fine work, but get the budget reissue, and supplement it with Eotvos 21 Jan 2007
By Christopher Culver - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This disc of two Luciano Berio works in performance by the Orchestre National de France and Pierre Boulez was originally released on Erato in 1986, and it is this version which this Amazon listing describes. However, Warner Classics reissued it at budget price in 2001 in their "Apex" line, a bargain which the contemporary music afficionado should seek out. As you shall see, I do not think this disc has the best performance of a key Berio work, but nonetheless it has much to recommend itself.

"Sinfonia" for eight voices and orchestra (1968-69) is one of Luciano Berio's greatest works, vast in its proportions and in the musical traditions it incorporates. The eight voices are meant to be jazz singers, and Berio wrote the piece for the Swingle Singers, who appear here in a later lineup. The first two movements are quiet and mysterious. In the first, the singers gently intone selections from Levi-Strauss' retellings of Brazilian myths, made so vague that only the phonetic properties matter. In the second movement "O King", an orchestration of an earlier independent work, the singers slowly build up to the name "Martin Luther King", who had been murdered the year before.

The third movement of "Sinfonia", the extroverted "In ruhig fliessender Bewegung", is the most famous. The skeleton of the work is the second movement from Mahler's "Resurrection" symphony, a little cut-up and reordered. Over this, Berio has a tenor reciting text taken mainly from Samuel Beckett's "The Unnamable" and Berio's own journalistic writings, and the orchestra responds with quotations from fifteen composers. For example, when the narrator uses the term "the lowing cattle, the rush of the stream", we hear part of Beethoven's "Pastorale" symphony, while a singer's cry "This is nothing but an academic exercise" is ironically accompanied by music by Hindemith. Every listener has his own favourite part of this movement, mine is when the narrator says "I have a present for you" and the orchestra responds with that big tutti chord that opens Boulez' "Don" (which is to say "Gift").

The fourth and fifth movements return to a subdued tone. The fourth brings back Levi-Strauss references and is rather brief. But for all my initial passion about the third movement, I find it is the fifth which is the most intriguing and satisfying. Originally "Sinfonia" was written in four movements, but after the first performance, Berio was unhappy that these four movements were not reconciled to each other. In the fifth movement he subsequently wrote, therefore, we hear references in the form of quotation and harmonic development to the original four movements, a savage mix of voices, confused percussion, and threatening trombones a la Per Norgard's fifth symphony. A splendid end to a massive work.

For a long time, this was *the* recording of the "Sinfonia" to have. However, I must say I find it superseded by that on Deutsche Grammophon in the "20/21" series, where Peter Eotvos leads the Goteborgs Symfoniker. In the third movement, Eotvos keeps it going at a very nice clip, creating a dizzying parade of images. Boulez, on the other hand, keeps things quite slow; if one has already heard the Eotvos recording, terms like "molasses" come to mind. Also, Ward Swingle's narration, while it might have worked for Berio in forty years ago, now makes this sound like a dated '60s happening, and the Eotvos performance Nonetheless, Boulez's handling of the other four movements is quite fine, and I certainly invite Berio fans to get this.

The liner notes for "Sinfonia" consist only of Luciano Berio's own programme note, which covers all the basics. However, those enraptured by the piece would do well to seek out David Osmond-Smith's PLAYING ON WORDS: A Guide to Luciano Berio's 'Sinfonia' (University of Chicago, 1987) ISBN 0947854002.

Even if the performance of "Sinfonia" is not my favourite, the following "Eindrucke" for orchestra (1973-74) is very entertaining. Where does one go after one has reconciled himself to the whole classical tradition, giving birth to the first postmodern symphony? Evidentally back to modernism, but of a fresh new type. "Eindrucke" is a quintessential 1970s Berio piece, interested in organically generating material from strict processes, while still remaining dramatic and easily accessible..

I should add that this is an IRCAM recording, meaning that these two works appear in crystal-clear sound. Bottom line: get the Eotvos recording and this, and enjoy a thrilling tour de force of the 20th-century music.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback