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Silverwater CD

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

Price: £13.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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£13.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (30 Nov. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Rer
  • ASIN: B002VYQXT0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 169,931 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

BBC Review

The Necks are among the world’s most consistently great exponents of improvised music. While their last album Townesville (2007) was an inspired example of what they do onstage, Silverwater (named after one of Sydney’s industrial suburbs, synonymous with its jail) returns them to the studio, and finds them on typically fine form.

Although they created it spontaneously, much of the appeal of this single 67-minute piece lies in the way individual parts have been edited into and out of the mix as it unfolds in an ever-changing series of overlapping tableaux. The music pulses and flows with all the chaotic, natural logic of passing weather systems. It isn’t always easy listening, largely as a result of Tony Buck’s drums and percussion, which may at times try the nerves. Silverwater is the kind of album you might put on at the end, rather than the middle of a dinner party, perhaps as an incentive for recalcitrant guests to leave.

The trio’s arrangement of piano (Chris Abrahams), drums (Buck) and double bass (Lloyd Swanton) still forms the basic musical template. But Silverwater has a greater variety of sounds – many beautiful and intriguing, others more unsettling – than most of its makers’ recent albums. There are sumptuous gongs, a loitering organ, twitchy, low-key electronica, waves of electric guitar ambience, the clattering sound of the anklung (a tuned bamboo rattle used in Indonesian traditional music) and even some whistling. 

To take one inspired sequence as an example, at around 17 minutes in, against a rising four-note bass motif and some rather shamanic tom rolls, you suddenly notice the introduction of a gently tapped cymbal. A short while later, what sounds like some sort of night insect (but could be a synthesised effect) appears, followed by shimmering keyboard… and so it goes on.

The last third of the album is unusually quiet, but listen closely and you can hear a funk rhythm section pounding away in the room next door to the studio… or is it coming through the walls of your flat? Aural hallucinations abound. Perhaps the most surprising thing about The Necks is how obscure and unique they remain, at the cutting edge of Australian music. --Jon Lusk

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

I was drawn to this by Richard Williams's enthusiasm for The Necks in his book on Kind of Blue. I took a deep breath and invested in this. So what do you get?
A 67 minute improvisation by three guys on piano, bass and drums - in other words a jazz trio. But this isn't trio jazz, it's wholly improvised. Nor is it typical improvised music; it develops/evolves very slowly in front of your ears - no scribbling or trying to drown out the competition, its certainly not Brötzmann for instance (and I like his music). The effect is reminiscent of Terry Riley's In C but with more sense of development (and in the case of this album, less sense of rhythm; there are sections where the metre is much more implied than in your face). The music rises and falls over the 67 minutes in a remarkably organic way.
This music must be extraordinarily demanding to play; the level of concentration these guys must work at is, to me anyway, a little intimidating. There is nowhere to hide, no place for finger flapping. Listening to it as a whole is also demanding - but more because of the duration than the music itself; over longish periods little happens before it starts to mutate into the next shape. Its easy to understand Eno's liking for The Necks.
Do I like it? In the period since it appeared on the doormat I've played nothing else - a very unusual occurrence. It truly is a beautiful piece of music, breathtakingly so.
Will I buy more? You bet.
Would I recommend it? Absolutely.
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I bought this on the basis of a review in the Friday Guardian Arts Review a few weeks ago. And struck gold. This is wonderful. One long gradually evolving piece, it needs to be listened to. At times it has the feel of the minimalist composers (which I love) then a catchy rythmn quietly builds in the background. My wife (kd lang/female vocalists in general fan) thinks it's great. My daughters 17 year old boyfriend (dubstep boy) thought it was cool. Now I have to buy all the other Necks recordings
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Verified Purchase
Like Mooseblaster, elsewhere on this page, I first learned of The Necks through Richard Williams' 'The Blue Moment'. John Coltrane, Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, John McLaughlin, there is no end to the influence of Miles Davis. That list is just some of the musicians who felt the heat direct. Tomasz Stanko and others, indirect; so with The Necks. They will not be unconscious of this. As with just a few albums, the first time I listened to this I thought I had tossed my money down the drain. Not so! With repeated listenings it opens up rhythmically, lyrically, thoughtfully, as phase after phase passes through to finally reach a totally satisfying conclusion. They have an interesting web site too. This is music that will last.
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