Shop now Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

31
4.1 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 23 April 2011
This is the second time I've written a review for this book, the first mysteriously didn't make it...

Thought this book was a bit trite and did not match up to earlier books in the series. The whole religious plot was a bit unbelievable I thought, especially where the main characters seemed to have so much obscure knowledge. And the whole circus train thing...come on! The author seems to be going down the Patricia Cornwell route with the werewolf...

Hope to see a return to form in the next book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
I've read almost all of Linda Fairstein's crime novels featuring prosecutor Alex Cooper and the NYPD detectives Mike Chapman and Mercer Wallace. This is number thirteen, and although it had many of the characteristics of Fairstein's earlier work, I did feel perhaps that something was missing this time round, and I wonder perhaps if the author is becoming a little weary of her characters. Fairstein's work is firmly rooted in New York city, and for each book, she draws on an aspect of the city's past as the backdrop for her plot. This time, it is the Big Apple's religious heritage under the spotlight, when the burned body of a young woman whose head has been severed is found on the steps of a baptist church. As coincidence would have it, Cooper's legal work also has connections with the church and the plot also allows Fairstein to examine the role of women in contemporary religious practice. I always find the historical research included in Fairstein's novels interesting - sometimes there is rather too much of it though that isn't the case here. What I would have liked more of is the banter between Alex, Mike and Mercer which for me, is what really makes these stories come alive. The elements are there - the Jeopardy quiz show and so on, but somehow it all felt a bit flat and formulaic. This was worth reading for me because I've followed Alex Cooper through thick and thin but probably is not the best in the series, nor the place to start if you haven't read any of these books before.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 28 April 2011
I have read everyone of the books in this series and have enjoyed them, the first few better than the later ones but i have kept going. This book was terrible, so much non essentual desriptions of churchs and religion that i have given up reading it, luckly i borrowed it from the library and didn't pay for it.

I hope the next in the series will be better.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2011
This is not Fairsteins's best work by any stretch of the imagination - it fulfils a yearly requirement and that's it..keeps the kettle warm. Cooper is not the main character in this book, she is very much the sidekick to Mike Chapman and his far too extensive religious knowledge - to be honest this is almost a religious crime story a la Dan Brown.
I lost interest quickly as one needs to have a fair amount of knowledge in religion to be able to grasp the apparant significance of the crimes, and it is almost a listen-and-learn story from the "expert" Chapman; Cooper is the bit part player in a detective novel. Not great - if this is your first Cooper read please read from book 1, "Final Jeopardy". this is 13th time unlucky; and please Fairstein, revert to type for thre next epistle....Cooper is the heroine and lead; she is a forensic expert, and Chapman is not the clever-clogs expert with the dismissive attitude he has here, bemoaning Coops almost apparent ignorance of religion. Here's to book 14, it has to be better!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 3 July 2011
I've enjoyed every one of Fairstein's novels, including this one. She's one of those authors who uses facts very well. Too well for some who suggest that they're actually unbelievable fiction.
'Old' St Pats in New York exists, as do the other places described in 'Silent Mercy'.
'Circus Trains' exist, and are used today by at least two circuses in the USA - including Ringling Bros/Barnum and Bailey (I believe one is based in Florida !).
The Magisterium, the Danube Seven, the First Lateran Council, Canon Law (and the way it's used) and a host of other people, places, and events are all factual, and Fairstein skillfully includes them in the plot. It's often the case that 'fact is stranger than fiction'. For example, many practising Catholics have been excommunicated or 'silenced' after speaking out for women's rights, equality, or stating that abortion should be allowed in certain circumstances (rape victims/likely death of the mother).
These, and others, are not, as one reviewer claims - 'unbelievable'. They are facts, and they are going on today.
Penikese Island exists and yes, it was a leper colony during the dates given. It's now a home for 'disturbed' boys, and has been since the 70's !
There are 'male only' Pentecostal churches that claim young men can 'find Jesus' through violent martial arts.
Fairstein doesn't have to make anything up !
Even the cross-examination of the Bishop is based on a verbatim transcript of a deposition given by Bishop Curry of Los Angeles before a child sex abuse trial. The deposition is actually far, far worse, and is very real (see 'The Case of the Pope', Geoffrey Robertson QC, appendix A)
Okay, some people have no interest in the news, or the thousands of clerical child abuse scandals that have come to light in the last decade, with more being added almost daily. That's no reason to say that they are fiction.

Yes, I've studied and researched church/religious history for many years, but I don't know how anyone can have missed last year's Irish reports, or the excommunication of the doctors who carried out an abortion on a pregnant (with twins) 9 year old in Brazil, and her devout mother (the child would have died, along with the twins, if the pregnancy had continued), but NOT the child's rapist (her father).

Should religion and it's extremes be a subject for a crime thriller ? Of course it should, and in real life it's no 'coincidence' (as one reviewer states) that many Sex Crimes Units have to deal with the religious, both as victims and perpetrators, on a daily basis.
Dozens of US cities and their DA's/Special Victims Teams have become involved in these cases recently. They involve thousands of abusive clergymen and tens of thousands of victims from numerous faiths and denominations.

Fairstein and other authors are no longer willing to ignore these events or situations, and are including them in their novels.
We should welcome this.

As the author says, she wants her readers to learn something, and with this offering, like all her previous ones, you will. It might even inspire you to go out and learn more.
After all, you never know what's going to come up in a pub quiz !
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 21 November 2013
It's the Da Vinci Code with a serial killer of religious women in New York.
Fairstein's writing essentially the same book every time by now, and she can't have a murder occur without her detectives needing to enquire as to the architecture, history and original inhabitants of the building.
Her prosecutor of sex crimes pops up at grisly scenes when there is no indication whatsoever that a sex crime has occurred - and there are plenty in the city.
The conveniently mostly absent French boyfriend is absent in France again. I have to believe this heroine uses always absent men as a way to avoid an actual relationship.
The cast is the same, their lives are the same, as in the previous book. No character arcs that I can see.
If you are new to this author, you may well enjoy it, though you'll be puzzled by the instant delving into a building's history and religious significance when an unfortunate woman happens to be found dead on the step. The human aspect in storytelling has been replaced by this guidebook writing, and we get little sense of who the women really were.
There is an essay on the church's anti-women and anti-ordained women bias and plenty of references to church-ignored inappropriate conduct with minors. It seemed to me that Fairstein could have made these points without dragging in a serial killer who has a fixation on historically significant religious buildings. One woman would have sufficed, and if that was the motivation, the body could have been dumped in Central Park for all anyone needed to know.
Personally I'd suggest reading the first four books, from Final Jeopardy on, as they are excellent reads.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 April 2013
This was a bit of a return to form. The last couple of books were too full of historical facts. If I wanted to read a history book I would buy one an not a crime fiction novel. This still had historical detail but there was more of a crime thriller in there too.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 30 November 2012
Have been a reader of Linda Fairstein's books for many years. Feel that the books are becoming boring and repetitive. Author needs to sharpen up her plots.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 May 2011
i always enjoy L F books but i think the series has reached a natural end and is not as well written nor does it flow like previous books
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 November 2011
I'm always impressed with the amount of research that goes into Linda Fairstein's books. Yes, we are on familiar territory and there are cliches: history and geography lessons, religious fanaticism, mistaken identity, disguises.

My biggest disappointment is with the characters, who don't seem to have developed much in recent books. Maybe it's a particular style of writing, or a nod to those who haven't ready earlier books, but I really don't want to be told for the umpteenth time who Alexandra's friends and office colleagues are if they aren't part of the plot. A gesture to the writer's real friends and colleagues maybe? And I don't need a recap of previous adventures. This is probably designed to make people buy the back catalogue.

On its own, I enjoyed the book. The galloping about from state to state with everything falling into place is improbable. I'm pretty sure that the heroine exceeds her job description by a very large margin.

I would prefer to be given enough clues throughout the book to work out the end for myself but that's a different style of crime writing. OK to read this on a journey or to fall asleep to, but time for the writer to come off autopilot I think.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.