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Silent House Paperback – 4 Apr 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Open Market - Airside ed edition (4 April 2013)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 0571275966
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571275960
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.6 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,154,266 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Orhan Pamuk, described as 'one of the freshest, most original voices in contemporary fiction' (Independent on Sunday), is the author of many books, including The White Castle, The Black Book and The New Life. In 2003 he won the International IMPAC Award for My Name is Red, and in 2004 Faber published the translation of his novel Snow, which The Times described as 'a novel of profound relevance to the present moment'. His most recent book was Istanbul, described by Jan Morris as 'irresistibly seductive'. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2006. He lives in Istanbul.
Orhan Pamuk, described as 'one of the freshest, most original voices in contemporary fiction' (Independent on Sunday), is the author of many books, including The White Castle, The Black Book and The New Life. In 2003 he won the International IMPAC Award for My Name is Red, and in 2004 Faber published the translation of his novel Snow, which The Times described as 'a novel of profound relevance to the present moment'. His most recent book was Istanbul, described by Jan Morris as 'irresistibly seductive'. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2006. He lives in Istanbul.



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Product Description

Review

'Confirms Orhan Pamuk as one of the greatest and most prophetic of political novelists.' --Mark Lawson, Guardian Books of the Year

'An eerily prescient work of fiction.' --George Pendle, Financial Times Books of the Year

Praise for Orhan Pamuk:
'Essential reading for our times.... In Turkey, Pamuk is the equivalent of a rock star, guru, diagnostic specialist, and political pundit: the Turkish public reads his novels as if taking its own pulse.'
--Margaret Atwood, "The New York Times Book Review" --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

Never before published in English, Silent House, Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk's second novel is the moving story of a family gathering in the political shadow of the impending revolution of 1980. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Denis Vukosav on 25 May 2014
Format: Paperback
"Silent House" by Orhan Pamuk is one of his earlier novels, originally published in 1983 and has recently been translated into English, in gradual translation of all the author's works, given the author's getting the Nobel Prize for Literature .

The story of the novel takes place in the background of the military coup that took place in Turkey, three years before the release of this book, precisely one month before the September 12th 1980 when Gen. Kenan Evren and Turkish armed forces have introduced order in the country after the conflicts of nationalists and communists, and remained in power until 1983 when democratic order was reestablished.

The background of these historical events is very present in this novel which connects tradition, transition of Turkish society and intergenerational tensions.
Family gathering is going to happen in a fishing village near Istanbul, where Fatma who is 90-year old widow of local doctor will be visited in a regular summer visit from her three grandchildren.
The story is told by Fatma, her three grandchildren and Fatma servants.

First grandchild, Faruk, who is a historian, continues to work on the manuscript of his father and grandfather, who is a sort of encyclopedia telling a little about everything in Turkey.
Another grandchild is Niljun, beautiful student and leftist activist who regularly buys communist newspapers and dreams to live in a world created on the Soviet model.
A third grandson Metin, is a high school student who dreams of the promised life in America, cultivating peanut somewhere in Georgia. He wants to leave his country and don't see why his grandmother shouldn't sell her property and give him the money to realize his dreams.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Cogan / Heike Wessels on 15 April 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although it's one of his earliest novels (but only recently avaialbale in English), I think it's one of his very best. The atmosphere as ever is truly palpable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MUN13 on 11 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback
Silent House is a 1983 novel by Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk, written and published in Turkish. It is almost three decades later that it has been translated into English, which lets us have a peek into the earlier works of one of the finest writers of our times.
This book is Pamuk's second published work and is markedly different from his latter masterpieces - the works that we are more familiar with like Snow, My Name is Red or The White Castle. It is not as mysterious, magnificent or witty in comparison but definitely shows the writer's strength in keeping his audience entrapped with his story telling.
The backdrop of the story is a coastal tourist spot. Three young people arrive here from Istanbul to pay a visit to their octogenarian, invalid grandmother who lives alone in a big, decaying house in the care of a devoted but oppressed dwarf servant called Recep. And to visit the graves of their deceased parents.
The decaying house is symbolic of all that happens in the story. The grandmother Fatma is an embittered matriarch. A Turkish version of Miss Havisham, Fatma is still reeling from the bitterness of her disastrous marriage to an idealistic doctor Selahattin who brought her away from those she knew and loved into an obscure small place, chasing dreams that never materialised. His extremely modern religious and political views and alcoholism in later life still manage to enrage her so many years after his death.
Here arrives Faruk, Nilgun, and Metin. Faruk is an alcoholic like his father and grandfather. He is a divorced professor disillusioned with life. Nilgun is a young woman with leftist views while the youngest Metin is a young student desperately looking for love - and sex - and money which he believes will all be his when he is able to go to America.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JCT on 17 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Gently gently with a cumulative and repetitive flow a bit like The Waves the story is built up and up and up until you reach a greater understanding of people and life
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Geoff Crocker on 20 Feb 2013
Format: Hardcover
Orhan Pamuk's `Silent House' is a narrative portrait of Turkey's unpromising struggle towards modernity. There is little plot and so in some ways it's a rather flat read, neither gripping nor inspiring. But it does gently hold your attention. The radical doctor Selahattin, though dead, still dominates the account. He literally copies western modern thought into his planned encyclopaedia, but this fails to inform his behaviour which is brutally feudal. His surviving wife and dwarf offspring are brutalised, and the one mistreats the other. The young generation drifts and is dissolute. The tension between communist and nationalist claims is destructive. Pamuk offers only a bleak perspective on modernity in Turkey after Atatûrk. The transition fails.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Colleen on 29 Nov 2012
Format: Hardcover
This earlier work does not disappoint at all, in fact it is a sleeker work than his later fiction and possibly a good way in.
I found myself wandering through the narrative until an uneasy suspicion that there was a tragedy about to ensue.
As with all my favourite Pamuk books, I put this down when I finished it and felt. I felt devastated and experienced a rolling wave of catharsis. The only other author that makes me feel this way when I finish reading is Beryl Bainbridge.
I finished the book a week ago, but my mind keeps picking at it when I least expect it.
To discuss plot and characters within the work would almost unpick the pleasure of discovering both.
I love to visit Turkey (particularly Istanbul) and Pamuk helps me be there when I have work the next morning. A great author of our age. I am overjoyed that this has been translated so that English readers may experience more of his work.
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