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10 Jun 2013 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 7.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
6:38
2
7:33
3
6:33
4
7:33
5
9:57
6
8:48
7
13:00
8
11:44

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 10 Jun 2013
  • Label: XL
  • Copyright: 2002 Sigur Rs under exclusive license to XL Recordings Ltd.
  • Total Length: 1:11:46
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00D8HO9FO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 33,141 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Monkey on 2 Mar 2007
Format: Audio CD
...is two adjectives that come mind for this record. This was my first exposition to Sigur Rós. And on first listen, I was rather bemused. No really I was, the first time I listened, I am not sure I knew what to think, It didn't really make any sense, to the point where it stayed in dark deep bottoms of my CD cupboard until a few months later. Indeed I thought I had made terrible mistake, buying it, after all what attracted me that strange afternoon in HMV, was the beautiful packaging. And Indeed it is beautifully packaged, a crystal white slip case, with paranthesis cut out, covers the jewel case, which itself has just contains blank book of black and white artwork on what I can only describe is soft parchment. You could say it is represenation of what is to come, once you slip it into your cd player. The sparse emptiness of the packaging is certainly a visual metaphor, for the dark empy heavy drones that precede on the album.

Having put the CD on few months later, I finally began to appreciate these were more than ramdom drones, but evocative emotions that transcended language barriers. The album is divided into two parts seperated by a 30 second silence after track 4. It begins with "untitled 1" or "vaka" as known as its known by its working title, which starts off with a desolate piano intro. A feeling of disconnection and emptiness is what drives the both halves of the album, sparse drum beats float, while Birgissons "hopelandic" falsetto coo's lonely in a gaseous depth strings and other instruements.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By De_Nada72 on 26 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
First of all, don't be scared that it will be depressing. It's dark, emotional and immensely powerful, is what it is. This isn't an album to share headphones for at the bus stop, or put on shuffle on your MP3 player with any other tracks. Possibly the only way to do it is listen to the whole thing, in order, in bed in the middle of the night when no one else can hear you. Or maybe on a plane. Or sitting up a tree in a forest after a long bike ride, where birdsong can add to it. They say you're meant to write your own lyrics on the ethereal pages of the booklet (be careful taking this out - it's fragile), and maybe I will one day, but at the moment I'd rather just do so in my head. Everyone on Earth should listen to this album at least once, and then they might just relax even for an hour and a bit. Track 8 is possibly the most beautiful thing I've ever heard. The only problem I can find is that of how to recommend it to your friends - I mean, how do you say it?
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Twonko on 24 Sep 2005
Format: Audio CD
I bought Ágtis Byrjun on the strength of a comment by some notable musician who I forget. I played it to death and loved it. So I bought some others and its () that has stayed in the car player ever since. It has just continued to grow and tastes a little different every time. It is very possibly the best album I have ever heard, contains no fillers and stays comfortably the right side of weird, unlike Von, which does get a bit much at times. After reading the other reviews, I think that to analyse the structure and meaning of it all is quite pointless. Just listen to it and take it for what it's worth. I'm sure that's what they want us to do. NO band in history does a slow build up quite like these guys and the ultimate directionless of most of the tracks is just part of the attraction. The new album, Takk, is good, but this is better. Buy it now and change your life.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By G. Bowden on 22 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
By the eve of the release of their third LP, Sigur Rós had ascertained an immensely impressive reputation in the international pop arena. Key surges in their popularity were fuelled by appearances alongside God Speed You Black Emperor and Radiohead at various festivals, generous airplay on radio and extensive soundtrack work (they featured quite heavily in Cameron Crowe's "Vanilla Sky"). Like many bands before them, they had the world at their feet thanks to a breakthrough album and needed to prove their mettle with the music press with their next release. And, quite commendably, Sigur Rós decided to strip away the grandiose nature of their last album in favour of a starker, more intimate affair with their listeners' ears. More challenging and at times rewarding than Ágtis byrjun, () is of a darker hue than the twee and twinkle that peppered their earlier work, but still retains the significant magic to carry itself along potently.

On (), the band fully realise their concept of Hopelandic music that was briefly indulged in on their prior albums. The tone and feel of the pieces is more akin to Von's gothic religion than Ágtis' slighter melodies, though thankfully the collective musical knowledge of the group has improved tenfold since then. Here, lead man Jonsi sings exclusively in his manmade gibberish in an effort to blend the vocals into the overall texture of the songs, often coming up with bewitching results (hear "Track One" especially, which is movingly subtitled after drummer Orri's daughter "Vaka" when played live). The arrangements behind the songs are simpler, more forceful and gradually build until they reach the very pinnacle of the best slow-burn stunner pop music has to offer (hear "Track Three" or "Attachment").
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