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  • Sibelius: The Complete Works for Violin and Orchestra
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Sibelius: The Complete Works for Violin and Orchestra CD


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Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
  1. Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op.47: I. Allegro moderatoChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard15:26£0.99  Buy MP3 
  2. Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op.47: II. Adagio di moltoChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 9:47£0.99  Buy MP3 
  3. Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op.47: III. Allegro ma non tantoChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 7:16£0.99  Buy MP3 
  4. Two Serenades, Op.69: No. 1 in D Major, Op.69a (Andante assai)Christian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 5:24£0.99  Buy MP3 
  5. Two Serenades, Op.69: No. 2 in G Minor, Op.69b (Lento assai)Christian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 6:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
  6. Two Pieces, Op.77: Cantique: Laetare anima meaChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 4:58£0.99  Buy MP3 
  7. Two Pieces, Op.77: Devotion: Ab imo pectoreChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 3:01£0.99  Buy MP3 
  8. Two Humoresques Op. 87: No. 1 in D minorChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 3:29£0.99  Buy MP3 
  9. Two Humoresques Op. 87: No. 2 in D majorChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 2:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
10. Four Humoresques for Violin and Orchestra, Op.89: No. 1 in G Minor for stringsChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 4:07£0.99  Buy MP3 
11. Four Humoresques for Violin and Orchestra, Op.89: No. 2 in G Minor for stringsChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 3:16£0.99  Buy MP3 
12. Four Humoresques for Violin and Orchestra, Op.89: No. 3 in E Flat MajorChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 2:47£0.99  Buy MP3 
13. Four Humoresques for Violin and Orchestra, Op.89: No. 4 in G MinorChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 2:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
14. Suite for Violin and Strings, Op.117: Country Scenery: AllegrettoChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 2:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
15. Suite for Violin and Strings, Op.117: Evening in Spring: AndantinoChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 3:29£0.99  Buy MP3 
16. Suite for Violin and Strings, Op.117: In the Summer: VivaceChristian Tetzlaff/Danish National Symphony Orchestra/Thomas Dausgaard 1:45£0.99  Buy MP3 

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Full package of violin music 19 July 2012
By Alan Montgomery - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The Violin Concerto is the reason you want to buy this album, but the "filler" is quite intriguing. Christian Tetzlaff plays the Concerto (Opus 47) with great intensity. If Thomas Dausgard with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra doesnt' quite match him, they don't pull him down either. The recording is wide ranging and well detailed.

To me the interest lies in the other violin music. While Opus 87 and 89 (the Six humoresques, divided by Opus for no really good reason), have become relatively known, the other pieces certainly have not. Of particular interest are the three final pieces, the Suite for Violin and strings. The suite is Opus 117, and that is about as late as anything Sibelius wrote.

All of the music has the sound of mature Sibelius - ruminative, moody, sometimes sprightly - and Tetzlaff captures every mood just right. You may need a few recordings of the Concerto (including the one of the original version), but this gives the entire picture of the violin music, and any Sibelian should consider this a "Must have."
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A Leaner, Meaner, Thoughtful Sibelius 24 Feb. 2010
By Giordano Bruno - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm amazed at how well I know the Sibelius Violin Concerto in D-minor. I'm not a fiddler, but I could grunt along with the violin, a la Glenn Gould but with better tuning. And yet I'm sure I haven't heard the piece in twenty years or more. It used to be supremely popular, but its star has dimmed, probably because it has been perceived as too schmaltzy and lightweight. I bought this CD for the violin, not the composer; Christian Tetzlaff, among all the current corps of fiddlers, sounds to my ears like a total musician instead of a mere violinist. And he has surprised me with a Sibelius of more depth and craft than I remembered.

There's enough romantic yearning in the themes of the violin concerto without much 'excess' from the soloist. Tetzlaff plays his part with a 'lean' intensity that accentuates its melodic development, and with a 'mean' attention to tuning, especially of the double-stopped passages, eschewing the tuneless vibrato of fiddlers of the mid-20th C. He is, in other words, playing to the aesthetic of OUR generation rather than Sibelius's own, an aesthetic that values insight over affect. The Danish National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Thomas Dausgaard, complements Tetzlaff perfectly. Clearly they are 'on the same page' of insight. This concerto can easily sound like a batch of cadenzas bumptiously interrupted by orchestral burps and growls. In this performance, however, the orchestra reveals its inner thoughts, its inner voices, and wraps those musical ideas around the violin in a rich conceptual structure. That 'thoughtful' Sibelius prevails throughout the first two movements. Then, in the concluding allegro, the folklorish Sibelius takes over, and Tetzlaff gives us a fiddle timbre that sounds like all the harsh fun of a Baltic frolic.

None of Sibleius's other compositions for violin and orchestra have quite the memorability of his Opus 47 Concerto in D-minor. Tetzlaff and Dausgaard perform them as delightful serenades and witty diversions. I don't know any of them well enough to compare this to other performances. Based just on what I hear, it seems to me that Tetzlaff's prime strength here is his ability to play quite softly with great intensity, and quite grandly without losing touch with his softer expressiveness. But he can also toss off flights of 32nd notes as deftly and accurately as anyone could wish.

Next up for me: Tetzlaff and pianist Leif Ove Andsnes performing the Bartok Violin Sonatas! I can hardly wait!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Refined Sibelius accounts by Tetzlaff, Dausgaard and Danish National Symphony Orchestra 20 Feb. 2013
By P. Adrian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I rank violinist Christian Tetzlaff very high in my preferences when it comes to living violinists. His exquisite musicianship and refined virtuosity are the qualities present in Tetzlaff’s interpretations whatever he chooses to play. Therefore, his recordings (as his live appearances) are always eagerly anticipated and share both critical and audience acclaim.

Here he plays a rare and difficult repertory, entirely devoted to Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. If Sibelius’s D minor violin concerto is a warhorse of the mainstream violin repertory, the other pieces for violin and orchestra by the same composer included on this CD are relatively less known to the audiences. The accomplished mastery of Tetzlaff deals in a magisterial way with these strange and fascinating works. Their northern aromas shine throughout due to both the soloist (whose insight plays a major part) and the orchestra (the excellent Danish National Symphony led by Thomas Dausgaard).

This recording will enchant a large spectrum of music-lovers: mainly Tetzlaff’s aficionados, but also rarities-amateurs, Sibelius’s fans, and not least violin performers who will find here some benchmark versions of this special musical realm.
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Tetzlaff is supreme, even if the whole performance isn't 16 Jan. 2007
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
To hear Christian Tetzlaff live is to be mesmerized--his ability to color the violin's tone is unmatched today. Perfect intonation, total control over bowing, and amazing sensitivity in phrasing are hallmarks of his style. Here he gives us all that and more; no one since Vengerov in recent memory plays the solo part with such hypnotic concentration, but Tetzlaff's style is more restrained and lyrical than his great Russian counterpart. Like Joshua Bell, he is poetic and never plays an ugly note, but Tetzlaff is less precious and self-conscious than Bell can be.

I wish he had had a better conductor than Dausgaard, who gives a straightforward, robust account of the orchestral part without finding any insights on the order of his soloist's. Salonen and Cho-Lin make a better team on Sony, as do Mullova and Ozawa on Philips. But Tetzlaff is too great an artist to pass by; I'd rank this reading along with Gidon Kremer's on budget EMI, where Muti is also dull in the accompaniment.

The rest of this generous CD is filled out with incidental pieces that Sibelius (a failed professional violinist as a young man) wrote for violini and orchestra. Each is pleasant, a few are memorable, but Tetzlaff is the whole show, really
the recording doesn't live up to the playing 5 Mar. 2015
By J. Klugman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
i found this recording disappointing. i'm a great admirer of tetzlaff's playing [i strongly urge you to buy his 2nd cycle recording of bach's solo sonatas and partitas http://smile.amazon.com/Bach-Sonatas-Partitas-Solo-Violin/dp/B000O5B52I/ ], but my problem with this recording is not the playing, it's the miking and/or sound engineering. i wanted tetzlaff's playing to be more prominent - instead there were times he was lost in the orchestra. overall, the sound seems somewhat distant, as if i were in a concert hall in row R, and with not the best acoustics.
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