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Showbiz (download)
 
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Showbiz (download)

28 Sept. 1991 | Format: MP3

£5.29 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.14 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:53
30
2
4:23
30
3
4:01
30
4
4:33
30
5
4:46
30
6
5:17
30
7
3:57
30
8
3:38
30
9
4:04
30
10
3:31
30
11
2:26
30
12
5:09
30
13
4:43
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 28 Sept. 1991
  • Release Date: 28 Sept. 1991
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 2003 A&E Records Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 54:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0028IYE18
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (172 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,394 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Snapman on 27 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
Showbiz is the debut album from Muse, which was marred by comparisons to Radiohead upon it's release. Whilst similiarities to Radiohead are visable throughout Showbiz, especially in Matt Bellamy falsetto vocals, this stands as a good album in it's own right.
The album gets off to a brilliant start, with two of Muses finest tracks - Sunburn and Muscle Museum - kicking off proceedings. But after this, things cool off a bit with the OK Fillip, and fairly average Falling Down, which never really achieves what it wants to do.
The middle of the album has a great run of songs. The heavy claustraphobic guitars of Cave, which then goes into the fantastic title track Showbiz, with it's pounding drums and forboding repetetive lyrics, which all comes to a thrilling climax in the final minute. Then comes Unintended, a beautiful ballad, followed by Uno, a short track in similar style to Cave. Sadly, the album starts to lose it's way after this point.
Sober is a track which does nothing to help Matt Bellamys voice, and quickly begins to irritate. Escape then follows, which promises to be something great, but fails to get to the point and never delivers. Then 2 minute Overdue kicks in, a track which features lazy lyrics, and fails to shine when compared to other tracks on the album.
The album closes with the wonderful Hate This & I'll Love You, which builds up into a brilliant climax, and is a fitting end to the album.
Showbiz is a good album, with some fantastic songs on it that sadly lacks consistancy. The trio of Sober, Escape & Overdue really hurt the album, and would have been better as B-Sides, and some of the b-sides (such as Host and Spiral Static) would have filled these places much better.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Jan. 2002
Format: Audio CD
I vaguely knew Unintended from the radio but had almost no idea who Muse were until friends recommended the album and I went out and bought it. Started off thinking it was a bit weird with some good songs, but not the best album - now its my absolute favourite! The melodies and harmonies are often unexpected, but so good that they make anything else seem boring. As someone who had heard no Radiohead material before listening to Muse, i can see the comparison, but would encourage you to ignore it - the songs are great in their own right, especially as they have an overall optimism that Radiohead lack. They always cheer me up! :)
Matt Bellamy does the vocals, piano and guitar, and the underlying tunes in the quieter parts are lovely as well as non-standard. The thing i like is the way most of the songs flip between quiet and introspective, to loud and angry, and the best songs are definitely Unintended and Sunburn - the second one just has a brilliant piano part. I'm not personally that angst-ridden, but the lyrics are worth it just for the rhythm they provide, and the sound of Matt Bellamy's voice in falsetto is wonderfully pure, but still a bit distorted. The last one, Hate this and I'll love you, is sung so honestly and with genuine emotion that i find myself empathising with Matt!
Basically, this is an amazing album that i could listen to forever, without a poor song on it - every one is unique in comparison with the others. And once you've heard this, you have to go out and buy Origin of Symmetry just to go with it! Although it's not 'quite' as good...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Samuel Simpson on 28 Jan. 2006
Format: Audio CD
I am an owner of all Muse albums - other than their limited release debut EP's. There is this (Showbiz), Origin of Symmetry, Hullabaloo (Soundtrack), and Absolution. It is Absolution that brought the world wide acclaim. But this album, released originally in 1999 shows why they were kicking up a storm in the smaller venues around south England. The album captivates the audience entirely. Piano and guitar, drums and bass, it all clicks together well. Some songs like Muscle Museum heavy chorus' and lighter verses. Some songs like 'Falling Down' show the other side to Muse, beautiful songs and wonderful lyrics and 'Falling Down' particularly shows off Matt's voice and its range. Never a bad note in this album. Each song has its own worth. 'Cave' shows both sides of Muse's talents with heavy powerful song and piano in other parts to contrast.
If you are a new-ish fan of Muse through Absolution you should try this as there are no bad songs on this album. 'Showbiz' as a song is my own favourite followed closely by 'Sunburn' and 'Unintended'. This album is definately a more raw sound to it than Absolution and sounds absolutely brilliant. Still the best Muse album to date.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 Feb. 2006
Format: Audio CD
The current musical trend is retro dance-rock, but Muse completely avoids that for their own brand of orchestral music. If you want comparisons, they're equal parts Radiohead and Led Zeppelin, with a unique sound that is both melodic and raw. Few debuts are as intense as Muse's "Showbiz."
A steady piano melody ripples by, followed by some steady drumming. That, in turn, segues into the expansive bombastic rock'n'roll of "Sunburn." Matt Bellamy sits in the middle of the song, singing in a trembly voice, "I'll feel/A guilty conscience grow/And I'll feel/A guilty conscience grow." Then he bursts into an anguished howl: "And I'll hide from the world/Behind a broken frame/And I'll run forever/I can't face the shame..." The music crests with it, a panoramic blend of guitar, bass and piano.
And that's only the first song.
The songs that follow are just as powerful, if a bit lower-key. Muse dabbles first in some truly ominous guitar pop, followed by acoustic ballads, and an angsty lament or two. Then, about halfway through the album, things get loud again -- songs like the title track have a wall-of-sound guitar'n'bass melody. In these songs, Muse sounds eerily like a British version of the Smashing Pumpkins.
Good as their debut was, Muse wasn't at their peak with "Showbiz" -- they hadn't quite perfected the epic-guitar thing, and the production isn't at its best. But they are still a compelling listen -- the climax of "Uno" is the sonic equivalent of being hit with a tsunami. For a band that was still defining their sound, it's remarkable.
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