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Shout to the Top: The "Jam" and Paul Weller: The "Jam" and Paul Weller Hardcover – 10 Jul 2006


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Omnibus Press (10 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846094011
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846094019
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 3.5 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,076,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"... a riveting read" -- Mojo, December 2006

"Entertaining and informative."
-- Play Music magazine, October 2006

"Munday casts a fascinating light on the troubled relationship
between Polydor and Weller ..." -- Classic Rock, November 2006

A well written, worthwhile read offering a no nonsense account of
what went on behind closed doors. -- peom.co.uk

Shout To The Top is a must for fans and the just-plain-curious
alike.
-- magazine.brighton.co.uk

About the Author

Dennis Munday has worked in the music business for more than 35 years. He was Polydor's Jazz A&R Manager, working with Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie and Oscar Peterson. He's also worked with Ritchie Blackmore and The Who before working with Paul Weller and The Jam. He lives in Italy.

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Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By sakamoto on 7 Sept. 2006
Great read with nice mixture of facts (from the label point of view), historical notes, friendly advices and a music lover approach (rare these days in the music biz). The last chapters should have been better edited: repetitions, many typos, strangely placed commas; probably rushed a bit to be as up-to-date as possible. All in all, a genuine work of passion with excellent knowledge and first-rate insight.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. Tilley on 5 July 2007
I agree with the other reviews - the amount of typo mistakes in this book is unbelievable. Don't they employ people to proof read? Every other paragraph you have to fill your own words in to make sense of the sentence and it becomes really annoying. He has an interesting story to tell and it's a decent read. I don't quite understand his point about TSC - that they should have stuck to the 'floating' line-up. He loves Steve White's playing, TSC changed bass players constantly, sometimes they used a horn section, sometimes a string quartet. Does he think they should have used different drummers?? Also, what does he mean when he says Steve White was one of the few drummers who knew 'where the 2 and 4 are'. I think that's exactly what most drummers of the time knew and little else. White is great at the non back-beat stuff ( 'Dropping Bombs,' 'Down in the Seine' etc). No excuses for so many typo mistakes (possibly not his fault) - it feels like you're reading a teenager's school project.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fitzcarraldo on 28 Sept. 2007
The world is still waiting for a decent biography on Paul Weller.

I was quite stunned at the ridiculous amount of grammatical and factual errors contained within the pages of this book, if the author is incapable of getting song titles correct how are we supposed to believe him when he details events that may or may not have happened. The constant references to the authors own working class background are unnecessary, why the need to mention it so often once it's been mentioned?
Must hold the world record for misspelling the word manager, unless John weller really is a 'manger', can't see it myself.

If this was ever proof read i suggest the author/publishers thank the primary school responsible but in future use somebody who actually has a grasp of the English language.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. SIRL on 12 Jun. 2007
As a biography of Weller, The Jam and the Style Council this told me little that I did not already know. However, as an account of Dennis Munday's relationship with the Wellers, and a peak into the often Machiavellian workings of the record industry there is some good stuff here.

Grammatically the book is poorly written, occasionally hard to read and must have more typos per square inch than any book I've ever read. And for a pop biography it is also quite a long book, with three clearly defined sections of roughly equal length reflecting the respective stages of Weller's career.

In brief, if you're seeking an eye-opening expose on The Modfather this book is not for you. If, on the other hand you're interested in the story of one man's on-off relationship with Weller (and Munday certainly seems to have been as close to Weller as anyone outside his immediate family) and in a true and frank account of how record companies really treat their artists, and vice versa, then there is enough here to make it a decent read
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The author of this book had the knowledge, experience, and opportunity to release a really unique, rich, and insightful personal evaluation of life in one of Britain's best bands and its relations with its record company. And to be fair, he does make some interesting points and highlights some fascinating dynamics throughout the book. What lets it down massively, though, is occasional vagueness -- such as why he was lucky to get the job with Polydor and how this actually happened -- and the not so occasional repetition, spelling mistakes, and missing words. Sadly this book is awash with grammatical errors, typos, and generally poor syntax. Instead of being held up as a valuable contribution to the wealth of material on The Jam it should be used primarily by publishers to underscore the importance of not sending the author's initial manuscript to press. Did anyone at Omnibus read this? Sadly disappointing.
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