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Shostakovich: Symphony No, 8 (Lucerne Festival Sep 2011) (C Major: 710004) [Blu-ray] [2012][Region A & B]

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra    Exempt   Blu-ray
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: £29.61 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Shostakovich: Symphony No, 8 (Lucerne Festival Sep 2011) (C Major: 710004) [Blu-ray] [2012][Region A & B] + Piano Concerto No. 5/ Scheherazade (Lucerne Festival Sep 2011) (C Major: 710204) [Blu-ray] [2012] [Region Free]
Price For Both: £58.76

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Product details

  • Actors: Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
  • Format: Classical, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: C Major
  • DVD Release Date: 30 April 2012
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B007N0SWGY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 101,278 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Andris Nelsons is one of the most sought-after young conductors on the international scene today and once again served notice of his extraordinary talent in Summer 2011 when he conducted two concerts with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam at the prestigious Lucerne Festival.

In this concert (available on DVD and Blu-ray) orchestra and conductor demonstrate their brilliance in some of the most spectacular orchestral works ever written.

Andris Nelsons is a regular conductor with many of the world’s top orchestras. He has many UK concerts including: Salome at the Royal Opera House throughout May and June 2012; Shostakovich Symphony No. 10 at Symphony Hall Birmingham (CBSO) on 7th and 9th June 2012.

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite outstanding 16 May 2012
Verified Purchase
C Major has given us two outstanding disks, both recorded live in September 2011 at the Lucerne Festival, the one under review here and the other with the Beethoven "Emperor Concerto" and Scheherazade as the major pieces (see my review). Both feature the great Concertgebouw Orchestra (rejuvenated in the past two decades and, as my friend Clive S. Goodwin observes elsewhere, with a welcome increase in women musicians) under the incredibly gifted young Latvian conductor Andris Nelsons. My first encounter with Nelsons was the recent Barenboim/Chopin piano concertos DVD recording (Arthaus: see my review) where he provided stunning accompaniment for the soloist with the Staatskapelle Berlin. As can be expected, C Major's audio and video are state of the art, much superior to some other labels.

Wagner's Rienzi Overture and Strauss' Dance of the Seven Veils from Salome are orchestral showpieces, brilliantly played with ample opportunities for the first desks to shine in their solo passages. Tempi are fairly slow, but to no detriment of the musical impact. Regarding musical substance (don't ask me to define the term in a brief review...) they may be lightweight, but they provide a welcome counterpoint to the Shostakovich 8, a multi-layered, dark, brooding and often sarcastic piece, arguably this composer's most "difficult" symphony, a journey of way over an hour's music through pain, despair, angst, defiance and lament. I have heard many readings of the symphony, most of which appeared to stay on the music's surface, unable to come to grips with the shifts in mood and to get to the core of this symphonic microcosm.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By I. Giles HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Verified Purchase
This concert was the first of two featuring the Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by Andris Nelsons and was held at the Lucerne Festival in September 2011.

The program features three fine works which together make for a very satisfying program. The concert opens with a taut performance of Wagner's Rienzi Overture and which clearly displays Nelson's conducting style as being physically very involved with the music making of the players. It is easy to see why his obvious enthusiasm would encourage considerable levels of commitment from the players and why he has attained such prominence at such a young age.

The performance of the overture itself is very steady at 13.19 minutes. This interpretation is markedly slower than either Klemperer or Handley on CD for example, but about the same as Tennstedt in Japan or the Lang-Lessing performance at the start of his opera recording which are both on video discs. This preference for slower tempi is maintained throughout the concert and applies to both the following Dance of the Seven Veils by Strauss and the 8th Symphony of Shostakovich where Nelsons adds about another 7 minutes to the interpretation by Haitink with the same orchestra on CD. This latter is not considered fast and it is no mean feat for Nelsons to sustain such steady tempi throughout without any accompanying slackening of tension.

Indeed, it is this important control of tension in these three works that is so impressive as all three works require such an approach in order to communicate their messages. Nelsons is able to make use of the high level of skill displayed by this fine orchestra to bring out all sorts of subtleties of expressive detail without any trace of sentimentality.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too Expensive 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase
A Great Orchestra and an inexperienced Maestro, in a below average hall, do not deserve this price.
This is a Blue Ray video. THere is no point to make videos of orchestral performances. The image is boring, on all of them. DTS-HD is not better than SACD. I have OPPO BDP-83, Simaudio Moon Amplification and TANNOY Glenair Loudspeakers. Blue Ray is for movies, that's all
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine performances rather than definitive in excellent sound 7 July 2012
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
This concert was the first of two featuring the Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by Andris Nelsons and was held at the Lucerne Festival in September 2011.

The program features three fine works which together make for a very satisfying program. The concert opens with a taut performance of Wagner's Rienzi Overture and which clearly displays Nelson's conducting style as being physically very involved with the music making of the players. It is easy to see why his obvious enthusiasm would encourage considerable levels of commitment from the players and why he has attained such prominence at such a young age.

The performance of the overture itself is very steady at 13.19 minutes. This interpretation is markedly slower than either Klemperer or Handley on CD for example, but about the same as Tennstedt in Japan or the Lang-Lessing performance at the start of his opera recording which are both on video discs. This preference for slower tempi is maintained throughout the concert and applies to both the following Dance of the Seven Veils by Strauss and the 8th Symphony of Shostakovich where Nelsons adds about another 7 minutes to the interpretation by Haitink with the same orchestra on CD. This latter is not considered fast and it is no mean feat for Nelsons to sustain such steady tempi throughout without any accompanying slackening of tension.

Indeed, it is this important control of tension in these three works that is so impressive as all three works require such an approach in order to communicate their messages. Nelsons is able to make use of the high level of skill displayed by this fine orchestra to bring out all sorts of subtleties of expressive detail without any trace of sentimentality. The Wagner overture is thus able to achieve a weighty military substance (the opera is about revolution and eventual destruction) without bombast, as indeed does the wartime Shostakovich 8th symphony while the Strauss Salome Dance achieves its seductive allure without losing sight of Salome's unsentimental purpose of achieving the head of John the Baptist as her ultimate reward.

The recording is of a high visual and sonic standard and is typical of the work achieved in these ways by the producer, Paul Smaczny, who is very experienced at recording concerts at this venue. The imaging is crisp and detailed and is based on obvious familiarity with the recorded works. The sound is equally fine and is presented in DTS-HD MA 5.1 and stereo.

I have enjoyed this concert very much as an addition to other recordings that I own of all three works. The concert does not provide definitive interpretations of any of the three pieces but they nevertheless add up to make an involving total concert. The audience is rightly very enthusiastic! This is a quality product overall and should give much satisfaction to future purchasers and, in my opinion, is therefore worth at least 4 stars.

........................................

Some dialogue from the comments section that may offer further help:

And this Review is even MORE interesting!!
Again, I'm waiting for my own copy... (U.K. review)

I thought that you might like to know that before I buy a recording I now look through all the reviews to see if you have posted one. Your assessments and opinions are invaluable. Thank you. (US review)

I particularly like your format of review. They give the prospective purchaser an idea of the style of the playing and relevant comparisons. They are succinct. Keep up the good work! (UK review)

I'm sure there are many other serious collectors, besides myself, who wait for your synopsis and opinion before spending their hard-earned money on new releases...
Keep up the good work!
Thank you (UK review)

............................................
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite outstanding Shostakovich 16 May 2012
By Gerhard P. Knapp - Published on Amazon.com
C Major has given us two outstanding disks, both recorded live in September 2011 at the Lucerne Festival, the one under review here and the other with the Beethoven "Emperor Concerto" and Scheherazade as the major pieces (see my review). Both feature the great Concertgebouw Orchestra (rejuvenated in the past two decades and, as my friend Clive S. Goodwin observes elsewhere, with a welcome increase in women musicians) under the incredibly gifted young Latvian conductor Andris Nelsons. My first encounter with Nelsons was the recent Barenboim/Chopin piano concertos DVD recording (Arthaus: see my review) where he provided stunning accompaniment for the soloist with the Staatskapelle Berlin. As can be expected, C Major's audio and video are state of the art, much superior to some other labels.

Wagner's Rienzi Overture and Strauss' Dance of the Seven Veils from Salome are orchestral showpieces, brilliantly played with ample opportunities for the first desks to shine in their solo passages. Tempi are fairly slow, but to no detriment of the musical impact. Regarding musical substance (don't ask me to define the term in a brief review...) they may be lightweight, but they provide a welcome counterpoint to the Shostakovich 8, a multi-layered, dark, brooding and often sarcastic piece, arguably this composer's most "difficult" symphony, a journey of way over an hour's music through pain, despair, angst, defiance and lament. I have heard many readings of the symphony, most of which appeared to stay on the music's surface, unable to come to grips with the shifts in mood and to get to the core of this symphonic microcosm. Suffice it to say that, from the first bar through the pseudo-optimistic and ultimately subdued finale, Nelsons and the Concertgebouw musicians deliver a deeply felt, immensely powerful and equally nuanced reading. The highlighting of details is in part due to the overall rather deliberate tempo, which I find appropriate to the symphony's inner development. For once, the tempi of the two grotesque scherzi are perfectly right, the Largo does not drag, but shines in its bleak beauty, and the entire musical experience is utterly moving. If you love the symphony, get this disk.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very enjoyable Shostakovich 1 Dec 2012
By Brian H - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Shostakovitch was a very accomplished composer unfortunately living through WWII and the regime of Stalin the butcher did little for his creativity.

I find some of Shostakovitch's work depressing and bordering on the grotesque.
Having said that it captivates life in wartime Russia as the grey period it was.
One can only imagine how hard it must have been living through this period of gloom & oppression.
This BR combined with works from Richard Wagner was palatable and very enjoyable.
Nothing more need be said about maestro Nilsons' wonderful performance.
Both audio and video are five star!
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very involving Shostakovich 8th. 14 May 2012
By Clive S. Goodwin - Published on Amazon.com
I have personally found the #8 a more challenging piece to get through than the 5th. or 10th. of Shostakovich. It was supposedly the middle symphony of the "War Trilogy", at one point dubbed the "Stalingrad symphony" by the Soviet authorities, written a few months after the Battle of Stalingrad, during which almost three quarters of a million people perished. However , in 1948, the piece was banned in the USSR because the ending of movements 1 & 4 were not bombastic enough. It was not performed again in Russia until 1958.

The 25 minute first movement is a brooding, mostly slow examination of the despair grief and sadness of war. It is worth the effort. The second and third are scherzi, blatantly militaristic and grotesque. They are, however, highly contagious music, and get appreciated more readily when you can watch the musicians - I love the trumpet solo in the third movement.The fourth is like a requiem, continuously weaving in the sorrow of human conflict. The final movement is mostly an allegretto with some adagio and allegro in between.

I was really drawn into it, given the advantage of the video component. It is played more slowly than I am used to, and the scherzi are missing some of the harrowing Russian extremes of brutality present in some cd versions, eg Mravinsky. But Nelsons holds it all together, and the tension never lets up. You will be drained after listening to it, but it will stay with you.

The Concertgebouw (RCO) plays as only they can with this music (they did a complete cycle with Haitink years ago, and it is still in their bones).

The Wagner Rienzi overture is jauntily done as is the Strauss Dance of the seven veils. The RCO is able to show its chops to full advantage.

This is one of the two concerts featuring this collaboration played at the Lucerne festival last year. The other one showcasing Scheherazade and the Emperor concerto is even more impressive (see my review).

As with all C-Major Bluray releases lately, sound, video and staging are impeccable. Highly recommended!
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding. 19 Nov 2012
By Colloredo von Salzburg - Published on Amazon.com
This magnificent video is from a live concert in Lucerne, in september 2011. The Concertgebouw Orchestra
is in top form, and plays wonderfully under the baton of Andris Nelsons, a young promise in the world's
conductor career. They played an exhilarating Rienzi overture, an energetic and sadistic Dance of seven veils and
finally a very idiomatic Shostakovich's 8th. Anyone could leave the Lucerne's Concert Hall very happy at the
very end. The concert was fantastic and the sound and video engineering are state of the art. A very
recommendable BR for classical video lovers.
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