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The Ship That Flew (Oxford Children's Modern Classics) Paperback – 19 Mar 1998


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; New Ed edition (19 Mar. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192717685
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192717689
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.9 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hilda Lewis was born in London. She edited her school and college magazines and taught in London for a time. Married, with one son, she and her husband lived in Nottingham, where Professor Lewis was a member of the University. She lived a quiet life in the beautiful precincts of the University where she devoted a great deal of her time to reading and writing as well as to running her home.

She wrote a number of novels for adults as well as the script for the film Mandy. She had always been interested in writing for children and considered that a children's book needs as much, if not more, care than an adult novel.

Hilda Lewis died in 1974.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It all began with Peter's toothache. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
Fantastic! This story was read to me by my teacher in the 1960's and I've been searching for it ever since! The adventures of the four children, vividly told, take the reader on an exciting journey into the past and their present (1930's). The story also operates on a deeper level, dealing with their mother's illness and the eventuality that all children have to grow up. My favourite adventure was where the children brought back a girl from medieval times to their present day - and the touching climax to the story of Peter will leave a tear in the eye of the reader! This is a book you will want to give your children and grandchildren.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Jan. 2001
Format: Paperback
I read this many times as a child using our local library's copy and always wanted a "desert island" copy for myself... or to lend to children I & my siblings would have.... Apart from the fantasy of time travel, it also helped spark a desire in me to learn Norwegian one day (along with Henry Treece's Viking tales).... which I did years later at UEA.... I also recall the delight at seeing the Bayeux tapestry in France and remembering the version of the story told in The Ship that Flew..... The sense of wonderment still sometimes washes over me..... and my annoyance of the silliness of "Catweazle" on TV which dealt with the same sort of theme
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Dr.R.L.J.Abbott on 21 Aug. 2003
Format: Paperback
This book was first published in 1939 and still exerts its magic-will "Harry Potter" survive as well?It is amagical tale of Norse myths and history linked in an engaging way that makes it easy reading for children.I read it in 1948, at the age of eight and never forgot it,my children had it first read to them in the 60`s and thenre-read it for themselves.More recently my eldest son read it to his daughters during a difficult time in Riyadh earlier this year.They were just as captivated by it as I was more than fifty years ago.We were thrilled to find it was still in print as our copy is getting rather worn.In the opening to the book "in a dark little shop ,in a dark little street" the hero finds the little "ship that flew"-it costs him "all the money he has in the world -and a bit over" a high price but it takes him into a world of wonder and imagination that children of all ages can share.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 July 2000
Format: Paperback
I too read this in the 60s at a time when I was reading Alan Garner, E Nesbit, CS Lewis and so on. A Ship that Flew is derivative of a genre which was pioneered by Nesbit (The Amulet, for instance), but is well plotted and scholarly, making very clever use of elements of Norse myth. I am sure that it will still be enjoyed by children today. On a more personal note: the author lived next door and it was a bit of a revelation that the cranky lady who used to shout at my mother when we played in the garden actually could relate to children at all. Somewhere at home we have a copy of the book which she gave to us when we told her how much we had enjoyed it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on 21 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback
Sandy was my favourite character because she is my age.My favourite adventure was when they went back in history for the first time - to Ancient Egypt - and met the patch eye man who had come through history to give Peter the ship. Peter recognised him but he didn't know where he had seen him before. The ship could take you anwhere you wanted. When you wanted to go somewhere you put it on a dry surface and said where you wanted to go. I made one in my attic. It didn't fly but my friend and I pretended we were flying and going somewhere exciting. First we went to fairy land, where we had to kill the witch and her army and then we went to comic land, where we met Tin Tin. When the children went to see the patch eyed king, he said 'eventually you will grow up and no longer believe in the ship that flew' and so Peter promised that when he no longer believed in it he would give it back and the king promised Peter that when he returned the ship he would have his heart's desire. And I'll let you discover the rest. My heart's desire is to fly on a broomstick. My sister Verity hasn't got one yet. Clara, 7, France
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Kingston on 24 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
Oxford University Press was wise to bring this book back into print (first published not long after WW2 I think). It's full of adventure, history and legend with the magical ship taking centre stage but the four children are well enough characterised to gain one's affection. I think the plotting (of all the magic!) is really terrific and there isn't any of the tedious moralising that appears in the chronicles of Narnia. I would say that the family depicted is ever so middle class (doctor's family if I remember rightly with big house) and the book has the stamp of its own time. But this hardly curbs one's enjoyment. The story is episodic with different adventures in each chapter but they are different enough to delight the average child and teach you some useful history too...

A short crit : the new edition is without the lovely line drawings and I miss these. If you want to enjoy these and get a hardback copy, go to Am. Mktplace and look for a 2nd hand copy.

Long may this classic remain in print.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Glenn Cook HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Oct. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like most people of my generation that attended Primary School in the 1960's we were exposed to this wonderful book in the perfect way: by having it read to us by a well respected teacher whilst sat on the reading mat and listening enthralled to the story.

Now of course children are taught the opening, the style, the genre and chracter use but never actually get to read the book in full- as to having it read to them well OFSTED saw to that.

This story has stayed with me for years and now 50 years later I can remember the features of the book well.

The simple reason is that it is a wonderful story in the same mould as The Narnia series by C S Lewis.
The story revolves around a family of children. The elder buys a little model viking ship from a mysterious shop.
The ship is magic and as you may tell from the story is able to expand and fly BUT what is more it may travel back in time.

I still recall the most memorable adventures the children have when they travel back to the time of the Norman Invasion and meet a Norman Lord's daughter.
Later they return and bring her back to their time/ She is amazed that the children are able to 'command the water to flow from their pipes' a phrase still etched into my memory now.

True the language and situations are 'of their time' attitudes and language have changed some not for the better perhaps but if you remember the book at all from your childhood I would urge you to revisit it.

But,if like me, part of te magic was in being read to then maybe not....
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