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Sherlock Holmes: The Devil's Foot/Silver Blaze [DVD]

Jeremy Brett , Edward Hardwicke , Ken Hannam , Brian Mills    Suitable for 15 years and over   DVD
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
Price: 9.95 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Sherlock Holmes: The Devil's Foot/Silver Blaze [DVD] + Sherlock Holmes: The Priory School/The Second Stain [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Jeremy Brett, Edward Hardwicke, Peter Barkworth, Norman Bowler, Denis Quilley
  • Directors: Ken Hannam, Brian Mills
  • Producers: June Wyndham-Davis
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Cinema Club
  • DVD Release Date: 9 Jun 2003
  • Run Time: 102 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000096KIO
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 84,495 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

A Sherlock Holmes double bill, with Jeremy Brett as the famous sleuth. In 'The Devil's Foot', Holmes sets off to Cornwall for a holiday but ends up trying to solve another mystery. Something has happened which has rendered one woman dead and turned her brothers insane. In 'Silver Blaze', a valuable racehorse disappears the day before a major race is to take place, and the owner is found dead in suspicious circumstances.


Customer Reviews

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4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Two brilliant Sherlock Holmes adaptations 11 July 2003
Format:DVD
"The Devil's Foot" and "Silver Blaze" are two TV-adaptations of A. C. Doyle's short stories of the same name, running each for about 50 minutes.
"The Devil's Foot" finds Holmes and Watson on a holiday in Cornwall, in order to try and restore Holmes's damaged health. But suddenly they are confronted with the case of a young woman found dead with a look of absolute terror on her face, while her two brothers, found in the same room, seem to have been literally frightened out of their wits. No trace of violence can be found upon the victims, though. Needless to say that Holmes is intrigued and starts to investigate, despite Watson's protests.
The adaptation remains very close to the original tale of A. C. Doyle. It is probably one of his most uncanny stories, and the film manages to convey that atmosphere brilliantly. Jeremy Brett plays the initially sick and bored Holmes and his transformation through the fascinating case very well, while Edward Hardwicke is simply great as his protective friend Dr. Watson. Especially the scene with the infamous experiment deserves full attention, as it is beautifully played - and is shows that this not only a good mystery, but also the story of two old friends.
The only major divergence from the original story is that the ongoing topic of Holmes' cocaine (ab-)use comes to a conclusion here. However, it fits in with the topic of the story. While the story is indeed not a little bit gruesome and the sensitive topic of drugs is dealt with, it is never done too explicit. Still, it should be kept in mind that it is not suitable for younger children and is indeed - in contrast to most other episodes - rated for an audience of 15 years or over.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Holmes goes West 10 Jan 2002
By A Customer
Format:VHS Tape
These two made-for-TV-films feature the late Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes and Edward Hardwicke as Doctor Watson, the best Holmes and Watson ever.
In The Devil's Foot, Holmes has been taken ill and travels to Cornwall with his friend to recover. However, his convalescence is violently interrupted, when two of his neighbours are driven mad, and their sister dies, from some unkown terror. Holmes and Watson put their own lives in danger in their attept to find the solution to the mystery.
This is one of the most memorable episodes in the series. Shot entirely on location in Cornwall, it was also one of the most expensive. Dramatised by Gary Hopkins.
Another expensive entry in the series was Silver Blaze, dramatised by a veteran of the series: John Hawkesworth. In this story Holmes again travels west, to Dartmoor, in search of a murderer and a missing race-horse.
This is one of Conan Doyles' most brilliant stories and it is expertly handled by Granada. Featuring Peter Barkworth in a memorable role as Colonel Ross.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Holmes in the west country 3 Jan 2002
Format:VHS Tape
Both episodes show Holmes and Watson handling mysteries in the beautiful, but often eerie English Countryside.
The Devils' Foot is at times disturbing as it represents Holmes (Brett also?)when he is suffering from physical and mental anguish, together with drug induced hallucinations.
Silver Blaze is a more conventional hunt for a murderer, but with a twist in the tale (tail?).
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Horse of a Different Color 27 Jun 2008
By Bentley
Format:DVD
SILVER BLAZE is a great story by Arthur Conan Doyle and may have been considered one of his favorites. A brilliant horse which was a favorite with the racing public goes missing and the worse is feared. Where was the first favorite for the Wessex cup? Coupled with the beloved horse's unknown whereabouts was evidence of a drugged stable boy and a murdered trainer. What happened to the horse, how did the stable boy get drugged and who killed the trainer?

This is a great story and is delivered admirably. Holmes even shows humility in this story which is certainly not a quality that he was well known for. He says to Watson: "Because I made a blunder, my dear Watson - which is, I am afraid, a more common occurrence than anyone would think who only knew me through your memoirs."

This story also shows Holmes to have his own moral compass and has him playing a "Robin Hood" of sorts in determining who should be exonerated and given amnesty. We see Holmes has his own unique sense of right from wrong!

As Kyle Freeman wrote in his Introduction to Volume I of the Sherlock Holmes anthology, " The first in the series, "Silver Blaze," pleased Conan Doyle so much that he bet his wife a shilling she couldn't solve the mystery. The story has some of the most brilliant writing in the Holmes Canon, particularly what is probably
the most famous of all Holmes's deductions: "the curious incident of the dog in the night-time", which has come to be known by the prosaic phrase "the dog that didn't bark." In polls of various Holmes Societies around the world, it regularly rates as one of the top ten stories."

I recommend this story highly.

Rating: B+

Bentley/2008
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Horse of a Different Color 27 Jun 2008
By Bentley
Format:VHS Tape
SILVER BLAZE is a great story by Arthur Conan Doyle and may have been considered one of his favorites. A brilliant horse which was a favorite with the racing public goes missing and the worse is feared. Where was the first favorite for the Wessex cup? Coupled with the beloved horse's unknown whereabouts was evidence of a drugged stable boy and a murdered trainer. What happened to the horse, how did the stable boy get drugged and who killed the trainer?

This is a great story and is delivered admirably. Holmes even shows humility in this story which is certainly not a quality that he was well known for. He says to Watson: "Because I made a blunder, my dear Watson - which is, I am afraid, a more common occurrence than anyone would think who only knew me through your memoirs."

This story also shows Holmes to have his own moral compass and has him playing a "Robin Hood" of sorts in determining who should be exonerated and given amnesty. We see Holmes has his own unique sense of right from wrong!

As Kyle Freeman wrote in his Introduction to Volume I of the Sherlock Holmes anthology, " The first in the series, "Silver Blaze," pleased Conan Doyle so much that he bet his wife a shilling she couldn't solve the mystery. The story has some of the most brilliant writing in the Holmes Canon, particularly what is probably
the most famous of all Holmes's deductions: "the curious incident of the dog in the night-time", which has come to be known by the prosaic phrase "the dog that didn't bark." In polls of various Holmes Societies around the world, it regularly rates as one of the top ten stories."

I recommend this story highly.

Rating: B+

Bentley/2008
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