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Sherlock Holmes: The Army of Doctor Moreau Paperback – 24 Aug 2012

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books; 1 edition (24 Aug. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857689339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857689337
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 1.9 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 233,835 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Adams has a filmic eye for detail and action, resulting in a rapidly-moving plot packed with adventure. --Cult Box

"The mystery is engaging and the characters are enigmatic enough that I didn t want to put the story down." --DNM Magazine

"An intriguing well-written story that will keep readers guessing right through to the end." --Wired s Geek Mom

"Fast paced and energetic." --Leisurely Geeks

"Succeeds both as a literary jeu d esprit and detective story, with a broad streak of irreverent humour." --Financial Times

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"The writing is crisp, the dialogue sharp, and the pace unrelenting. If you love old fashioned adventure, and of course, Sherlock Holmes, I think you ll find much to love about this one." --My Bookish Ways

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"...by turns both wonderfully wacky and wildly bizarre, if not just outright wild and wonderful." --The British Fantasy Society

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"This is a thriller, both of crime and horror. Trying to limit yourself to just one more chapter is as much a challenge as Holmes trying to survive his trial with this mad scientist." --Ain t It Cool

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"Adams has crafted another incident-packed thrill-fest." --Fantasy Book Review

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"I really enjoyed this book and found myself unable to put it down." --Nerd Trek

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

"The type of book that you can t put down, yet put off reading because you don t want the story to end." --Review Fix

Invariably, when the author has this much fun, the reader benefits. --New York Journal of Books

About the Author

Guy Adams trained and worked as an actor for twelve years before becoming a full-time writer. He is the co-author of The Case Notes of Sherlock Holmes, has written several tie-ins to the TV series Life on Mars. His most recently published novel is Sherlock Holmes: The Breath of God.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alistair P on 2 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback
Victorian steampunk-ish sci-fi mash ups are a popular genre these days, and mixing up characters from different authors of the era to see what happens sometimes works and sometimes doesn't. This time, Conan Doyle meets HG Wells as Sherlock Holmes is matched up with Doctor Moreau.

What's refreshing about this book is that Adams nails the Victorian era and ambience without slavishly copying either Conan Doyle or Wells' styles. Holmes and Watson and Mycroft Holmes are painted in a way that's completely in tune with their original characters, but by putting them up against a new adversary and in unusual situations, the result is a satisfying and enjoyable mystery and adventure, with plenty of twists.

It's far-fetched, of course, and Sherlock Holmes purists may have a problem with the great detective being put into situations where science is not quite realistic, but it would be dull to just rehash more of the same, so the mash-up element is welcome. Where The Army of Doctor Moreau does solidly pay tribute to the original is in taking a look at the philosophical and moral questions that HG Wells' original also contained.

So, if you were always disappointed that Conan Doyle and Wells never got together over tea to collaborate, this is for you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By neilc on 25 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback
Ever since I first read The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes when I was 8 I have been a sucker for anything featuring him and Dr. Watson. The problem is that when stories featuring him are bad, they are very very bad and can read like poorly written fanficton. Thankfully, that isn't the case here. In style it comes as close to the original as the best of them - Anthony Horowitz's House of Silk springs to mind - although a change of narrative perspective at one point is a little but risky and doesn't quite come off.

The influence of science-fiction/steampunk is also a little jarring but isn't overplayed, and then again the original Conan-Doyle story The Adventure of the Creeping Man did feature a man changing after injecting himself with monkey glands so the story featured here isn't too left-field.

It also reminds me a bit of Kim Newman's Anno Dracula series with it's 'spot the hidden literature references' but done in a subtle way.

Overall, well worth reading & I'll be reading the rest in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Philip K. Jones on 15 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the second novel by Mr. Adams featuring Sherlock Holmes. His earlier effort was "Sherlock Holmes: The Breath of God," in which Aleister Crowley and several "supernatural investigators" join Holmes in fending off evil. This new book also takes its inspiration from the popular fiction of the late Nineteenth Century, this time from H. G. Wells' "The Island of Dr. Moreau." It seems that someone is carrying on with the animal experiments of Dr. Moreau into the beginning of the Twentieth Century. At Mycroft's request, Sherlock turns to a team of 19th Century fictional scientists to uncover this evil. Scientists and adventurers of all sorts pop up at the oddest moments and places.

My main problem with the book stemmed from the 19th Century science at the bottom of it. Wells' works, while not being exactly prophetic, have usually been based on solid advances in science of one sort or another. His "Doctor Moreau," unfortunately, did not point to a glorious or even a practical future. Serums and extracts generally have no effect at the level of detail required for effective multi-generic crosses and mixes. The nature of the DNA control of growth and aging still remain beyond our science more than a hundred years later even though glimmers are appearing. On that basis, I found the required "willing suspension of disbelief" to be very hard-sought.

Once the science details are out of the way, the mystery becomes a good deal more interesting. Some unknown person is duplicating Dr. Moreau's work somewhere in London's sewers. Corpses are turning up in various states of dismemberment (mostly `fine') and no-one seems exempt. Shopkeepers, gentlemen, ladies of the evening and beggars all show up in parts at odd locations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gutenbergsson on 25 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback
Within the first several pages, it becomes obvious that Guy Adams in going to have a little irreverent fun with the legend that is Sherlock Holmes. Whether it's John Watson describing himself as "The Crime Doctor" (a wink to the 1988 movie, Without a Clue), his blending of H.G. Wells' tale of Edward Pendrick's visit to The Island of Doctor Moreau, or a nod to his own World House novels in the form of explorer and big game hunter Roger Carruthers, Adams has mashed together works by two literary greats of the 19th century and come out with a winner.

When citizens of London start turning up mauled by a variety of creatures that simply do not exist on her majesty's island nation, Mycroft Holmes (he who is the government) turns to his brother Sherlock and offers him a chance to serve Queen and country and solve a seemingly impossible crime. Mycroft knows the story of Edward Pendrick and Dr. Moreau (once in his employ) and fears that Moreau is either not as dead as was formerly believed, or that someone has resurrected his work as a vivisectionist, hoping to create a race of super beasts for their own nefarious purposes. Sherlock finds himself intrigued, and before you know it, the game is afoot!

The Army of Dr. Moreau is a rollicking good ride, as Holmes and Watson take to the cities sewers, tracing the path of a local gang leader whose description sounds suspiciously canine.
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