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Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study In Terror And Healing [Paperback]

Michael Taussig
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: 23.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

15 Dec 1991
Working with the image of the Indian shaman as Wild Man, Taussig reveals not the magic of the shaman but that of the politicizing fictions creating the effect of the real.

"This extraordinary book . . . will encourage ever more critical and creative explorations."‒Fernando Coronil, American Journal of Sociology

"Taussig has brought a formidable collection of data from arcane literary, journalistic, and biographical sources to bear on . . . questions of evil, torture, and politically institutionalized hatred and terror. His intent is laudable, and much of the book is brilliant, both in its discovery of how particular people perpetrated evil and others interpreted it."‒Stehen G. Bunker, Social Science Quarterly

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Shamanism, Colonialism, and the Wild Man: A Study In Terror And Healing + The Three Halves of Ino Moxo: Teachings of the Wizard of the Upper Amazon
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Product details

  • Paperback: 538 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; New edition edition (15 Dec 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226790134
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226790138
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 15 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 460,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
trip through the rubber boom of the 1800's in South America. From detailed historical survey to his first hand accounts of life around the Amazon, he never ceases to confront the reader with reality. His study is comprehensive in that he brings attention to all different aspects of the European, Indian and African people who live there. The study helps integrate the anthropological view of society to consider the religious, political, economic and moral as part of the collective consciousness of a community. Powerful book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Arguably one of the most accomplished anthropologists working today, Michael Taussig provides an intensely individualistic bricolage of literary, historical, and ethnological interpretations of his many years of fieldwork in the Upper Amazon. One of the most detailed and poignant accounts of shamanism in its cultural context - will very soon be regarded as a classic.
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Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more than a simple ethnographic investigation... 28 Jan 1998
By Henri Edward Dongieux - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Arguably one of the most accomplished anthropologists working today, Michael Taussig provides an intensely individualistic bricolage of literary, historical, and ethnological interpretations of his many years of fieldwork in the Upper Amazon. One of the most detailed and poignant accounts of shamanism in its cultural context - will very soon be regarded as a classic.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Taussig takes one on a terrifying, gut churning, horrifying 6 Feb 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
trip through the rubber boom of the 1800's in South America. From detailed historical survey to his first hand accounts of life around the Amazon, he never ceases to confront the reader with reality. His study is comprehensive in that he brings attention to all different aspects of the European, Indian and African people who live there. The study helps integrate the anthropological view of society to consider the religious, political, economic and moral as part of the collective consciousness of a community. Powerful book.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Profound and resonant 5 Jun 2012
By Jennifer F Armstrong - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Generally expressions of shamanism are associated with the lower classes of society who may be subject to great systematic oppression. This reality is exemplified in Michael Taussig's description of the colonization and slavery the Columbians.

Taussig speaks of wildness as a "death space of signification", which implies that rather than expressing subservience to the will of the colonial powers, shamans eliminate meaning as they turn away from civilization.

The "death spaces of signification" - the consequences of a culture of oppression - are a means of negation of the oppression though accepting death.

There are strong conceptual associations with the work of Dambudzo Marechera, especially his shamanistic outlook in Black Sunlight.

One also notes that Georges Bataille's writing, for instance in Unfinished System Of Nonknowledge upholds the value of seeking within a different mode of signification that has the appearance of being "nothing".

Whereas death or "nothing" seem to be the object of shamanistic seeking, one is advised to look very more deeply.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Difficult, but worth the effort. 23 Feb 2006
By Kevin Clark - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Michael Taussig takes a stance towards "terrorism" not common in today's world. By trying to trace the roots of this phenomenon, he brings to light many explanations and understandings many of us fail to realize, only because we have not come across them before. I give this book four stars instead of five simply because it is a difficult read, but if you are interested in what we, today, call "terrorism" and are willing to take the time to plunge into this book, then it will certainly be worth your while.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good, great! 27 Jan 2014
By Erik travis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
intense but well worth the read. I heard Terrence Mckenna recommend it and It has put a lot of perspective in good light. Namaste
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