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Shakespeare and the Uses of Antiquity: An Introductory Essay Paperback – 3 Mar 1994


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; New Ed edition (3 Mar 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415104262
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415104265
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.4 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,903,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Ovid was Shakespeare's favourite poet. Read the first page
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By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 April 2012
Format: Paperback
Written three years before his seminal Redeeming the Text: Latin Poetry and the Hermeneutics of Reception, this is Charles Martindale's elegant and theoretically informed engagement with Shakespeare's reception of classical texts.

As ever, Martindale offers insights into both bodies of texts, Renaissance and classical, as well as his thoughts on imitation and reception.

For anyone working on classical reception or Renaissance imitation, this is still an excellent starting point.
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