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Shadows

31 May 2010 | Format: MP3

£6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £12.96 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:32
30
2
4:24
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3
5:26
30
4
4:27
30
5
2:41
30
6
3:32
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3:42
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3:29
30
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3:25
30
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3:36
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11
4:00
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12
4:30

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 31 May 2010
  • Label: Pema
  • Copyright: 2010 PeMa
  • Total Length: 47:44
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003KV9F20
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 43,345 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Murphy on 19 July 2010
Format: Audio CD
I thought TFC's last but one album "Howdy" was a lovely piece and it is maturing nicely (but hey, it got me through a break-up, so...) but I felt that "Man-Made" was a little thin, with only Norman's songs standing out.

This LP promised the same thinness and on the first 2 or three listens I was a little dissapointed - nice noises but where's the passion?

THEN, all of a sudden, the tunes, the harmonies, the instrumentations and the lyrics hit you all at once and you realise this LP is SWOONY - light, airy, colourful and sweet, it is mature fanclub, packed with glistening moments and with an even spread of achievement across the personnel. The absolute platinum stand -out for me is Gerry Love's gorgeous "Shock and Awe" - as lovely and blissful a song as he has written in the past 10 years.

If you had left the Fannies behind, come back. This is a sweet and tender delight of a record that will be the soundtrack to your summer and maybe your autumn too. Think of it as the third part of a trilogy with the softer spoken "Howdy", "Man-Made" and now "Shadows". Heavenly stuff.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
The recent death of Teenage Fanclub's great inspiration Alex Chilton from Big Star served to remind you in addition quite how long the boys from Glasgow themselves have been "treading the boards". Like Big Star they have made over their inestimable career some of the most delicious pop/rock songs this side of the Pecos. The list must include songs like "Everything Flows", "Neil Jung", "Sparky's Dream", "Alcoholiday" "Ain't that enough" and "Starsign" which are up as some of the greatest British songs of the past two decades. It only seems like a nano second ago that "Bandwagonesque" their second album was actually topping Nirvana's "Nevermind" in end of year polls and indeed Kurt Cobain never hid his affection for the Fannies and regularly name checked them in press interviews.

Obviously if your looking for Flying Lotus style experimentation in a Teenage Fanclub album look elsewhere. Their strength is always in their songs with song writing duties generally shared between Norman Blake, Gerard Love and Raymond McGinley. As you would expect Roger McQuinn style harmonies predominate and songs packed with warm melodies and killer hooks. To be fair on this album they do branch out with the sumptuous piano ballad "Dark Clouds" and a guest spot for Euros Childs from Welsh wonders Gorky's. Other highlights includes the melodic rocker "Shock and Awe" which is vintage Teenage Fanclub and is guaranteed to bring an extra skip to your step, the truly lovely "Into the city" which is one of their best songs in a long long while and the slow rolling mesmerising country ballad "Today never ends" with echoes of Crosby Stills and Nash is excellent. Opener "Sometimes I don't need to believe in anything" demands no more than you lie back and stare into blue skies and be enveloped by its warmth.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sennj on 8 Jan 2011
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of Teenage Fanclub and this is a solid, though not spactacular, release. Lovely melodies, more hooks than a tackle box, an understated folky vibe--the record easily makes my top 10 for the year. The problem comes from the vinyl pressing that I received. As with far too many modern vinyl editions, there seems to have been little care taken in terms of releasing a quality product. My brand-new copy had numerous flaws--deep scuffs, scratches, voids--which caused several loud pops and constant noise throughout. A real shame and a tremendous letdown for fans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stan FREDO on 13 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
The good ol' Teenage Fan Club, now 20 years into the business of releasing albums. From the grungey/grebbo Catholic Education to an established formula of soft, melodious, guitar-led rock strictly their own (Songs from Northern Britain) via indie pop-rock masterpieces such as Bandwagonesque and Grand Prix. This new LP is in the vein of Songs from Northern Britain, like the 3 or 4 albums before. Yes, there is an early Big Star / Byrds influence, but with 3 capable songwriters, Teenage Fanclub are more than able to bring their own sound and stamp to the fore. However, it is not that easy to pick up the differences between this album and its direct predecessors. Why change the formula if it's good and keeps a sizeable - if middle-aged - public?
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jackson on 26 Sep 2010
Format: Audio CD
Since the beginning, Teenage Fanclub always remained true and
unique. I really enjoyed this album but I have to say, its not
quite as unique as previous Fanclub releases. Memories of the
Eagles even came to mind as I listened, and thats not such a
great thing. The Byrds yes, Eagles no thank you.

The songs here seem slower than most of Teenage Fanclub's
previous endeavors, except possibly their last album "Man-Made".
"Man-Made" was more psychedelic in its approach and effect,
thereby making the slower passages more interesting because of
the psychedelic flourishes.

"Shadows" has a few psychedelic moments, very very few. For the
most part it is very straightforward rural California style late
60's and early 70's pop rock. Yes, "Songs of Northern Britain"
was similar, but also more upbeat and vibrant, with some faster
paced songs.

The first track on Shadows, "Sometimes I Dont Need to Believe
in Anything", is suprisingly written by Gerard Love. This is a
big change because Gerard's songs are usually the melodic upbeat
songs that we really look forward to on Fanclub releases. This
is not the case anymore, as Gerard has drifted off into never
neverland not only on this track but on others as well. However,
I really enjoyed this first track very much with its noisy
background atmosphere and spacey vocals. An Excellent track.

Gerard's change of pace is not a bad thing here, its just
different. As track 2 kicks in with "Baby Lee" we would expect
THIS song to be a Gerard Love composition. Not so, as "Baby Lee"
is primarily a Norman Blake track, and the most melodic track on
the album.
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