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Shadow Ops: Control Point Mass Market Paperback – 31 Jan 2012


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Ace Books; Original edition (31 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937007243
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937007249
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 2.8 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,086,988 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

As a secu­rity con­tractor, gov­ern­ment civilian and mil­i­tary officer, Myke Cole's career has run the gamut from Coun­tert­er­rorism to Cyber War­fare to Fed­eral Law Enforce­ment. He's done three tours in Iraq and was recalled to serve during the Deep­water Horizon oil spill. All that con­flict can wear a guy out. Thank good­ness for fan­tasy novels, comic books, late night games of Dun­geons and Dragons and lots of angst fueled writing.

Product Description

Review

'A mile-a-minute story of someone trying to find purpose in a war he never asked for' (Jack Campbell, New York Times bestselling author of The Lost Fleet series)

'Black Hawk Down meets the X-Men ... military fantasy like you've never seen it before' (Peter V. Brett)

'Hands down, the best military fantasy I've ever read ... a chilling, enthralling story. Myke Cole just might be a wizard himself' (Ann Aguirre, bestselling author of Enclave) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

A phenomenal fantasy debut that has been described as 'Black Hawk Down meets the X-Men' --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Amazon J on 18 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a very intriguing mix, the story of what would have happened if Harry Potter hadn't realised he was a magician until he became a military helicopter pilot. This draws heavily on the X-Men mythos, with a society that hates and fears the Latents - humans who have developed magical powers such as necromancy, elemental manipulation and - in the case of our protagonist, Oscar Britten - 'portomancy' - the ability to travel anywhere on Earth, and between dimensions, at will. Stamping home the X-Men influence is the Magneto like character we meet halfway through the book, who considers Latents the next step of evolution, and wishes to enslave humankind.
But the author brings his own knowledge of military process to bear and a healthy imagination, giving us a dystopian US background, another dimension where Earth is at war with goblins and every other magical inhabitant, and a backstory of Native Americans fighting for secession with their own magical powers.
I think this book would appeal to Tom Clancy type readers, who want fast action, gritty heroes, and sexy ladies. For the typical fantasy reader, it may be a little on the 'action packed' side, a little two dimensional. The author does show fantastic confidence for a debut; clearly creating a large universe and background with plenty of potential for future sequels.
However my main bugbear was with the main character; much is made of the writer's military background, and yet his main character is a soldier who is completely incapable of following any order without questioning it, even before he develops his powers.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam Tyler on 6 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In my mind's eye I picture the army as a place that takes people and moulds them into soldiers. People become trained to the level were instinct kicks in at times of crisis and orders are followed without question. As an ex-soldier himself I imagine that author Myke Cole would know far better than me and in his military science fiction novel `Control Point' he paints the life of solider much different than I imagined. True this is a world where people are waking up with magical powers and being coerced into joining the force, but are those trained to defend us really as introverted and questioning as this bunch?

Lieutenant Oscar Britton is the main character in `Control Point', a lifelong military man he is trained to take out illegal magical users, only to become one himself. The book starts off running with some great action set pieces combining realistic warfare with added magical powers such as wind, fire and earth. Once the book settles down, problems begin to appear. Oscar is military through and through, so why is he always questioning authority? I always believed that you were promoted to Lieutenant by buying into the system, not constantly bucking it. Things begin poorly as Oscar goes on a mini rampage, although he has spent years fighting others who have done this - he is well aware of the consequences. The next part of the book has him being trained to use his powers, but he is constantly resisting. I can't imagine a man so ingrained in army life would act like this.

The problems of army life versus civilian attitudes continue throughout the book, vast chunks of the training segments read more like `Beverly Hills 90210' than army camp.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Trebell TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Control Point is the story of Oscar Britton, a military operative in an alternative world where people are coming up "latent" developing magical abilities. Britton, clearly a man troubled by the role he's being asked to play stopping these people when they develop these skills and capturing or eliminating them, finds himself part of the problem when he develops "portamancy" skills - an ability to open up gateways between worlds or dimensions.

The book is very fast paced and was a fairly easy read. I wasn't too surprised to find the author was former US military himself, the writing shows a real knowledge of the subject. He's also a self proclaimed D&D nut and this story has seen him combine his real world experience with that interest to create an interesting "what if". The approach very much reflected the authors US military origins in it's style when the action got going, though is a balance here not just non-stop mindless violence and it leaned more to something a military fan would truly enjoy than something for the more traditional fantasy fan like myself. I struggled to relate to the main character, I could understand his struggles and sympathise but I didn't entirely like the way he came across. Perhaps because he was written as a guy who'd been more soldier than person for a long time.

The book is certainly interesting. The idea of magic developing but not entirely randomly, with a number of schools of magic deriving from the range of possible abilities was interesting and reflected our love of categorising and pigeon holing everything, even things still poorly understood.
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