£19.99 + £1.26 shipping
In stock. Sold by makandmabel

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£19.99
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: kevin26821
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Serenade No. 1, Op. 11 (D Major/D-Dur/re Majeur/re) & Serenade No. 2 in A Major, Op. 16 for a small orchestra


Price: £19.99
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by makandmabel.
3 new from £19.99 9 used from £6.87

Amazon's Johannes Brahms Store

Music

Image of album by Johannes Brahms

Photos

Image of Johannes Brahms
Visit Amazon's Johannes Brahms Store
for 184 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Audio CD (15 April 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music
  • ASIN: B000065BYR
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 314,427 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. "Serenade No. 1 in D Major for Orchestra, Op. 11"
2. "Serenade No. 2 in A Major, Op. 16 for Small Orchestra"
3. I. Allegro molto
4. II. Scherzo: Allegro non troppo
5. III. Adagio non troppo
6. IV. Menuetto I and II
7. V. Scherzo: Allegro
8. VI. Rondo: Allegro
9. I. Allegro moderato
10. II. Scherzo: Vivace; Trio
11. III. Adagio non troppo
12. IV. Quasi Menuetto; Trio
13. V. Rondo: Allegro

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Jan 2005
Format: Audio CD
Brahms's two orchestral serenades fill a cd very well. Tilson Thomas adopts fairly brisk tempi in the 6-movement first serenade, and I suspect that if he had taken the more relaxed speeds favoured by Abbado with what I am learning to call the Berliner Philharmoniker he would have had to leave out the repeat in the first movement, which happily he does not do. In point of fact I find his account of the second serenade the more enjoyable of the two precisely because he seems more relaxed in it. In particular he lets the last movement go with its own natural easy swing rather than whipping it up at a furious pace in the way Toscanini used to do. In terms of the recorded sound, an issue from 2002 naturally puts Toscanini's 1942 recording (which may have been made in the notorious studio 8-H to judge by the dry-as-dust acoustic) in the shade, but it is not nearly as rich and immediate in its effect as Abbado's recording of the first serenade done in the 1980's. All in all, while I enjoyed this record I can't hear it as really a 5-star effort.
The liner note is quite informative up to a point, and as usual there is a fair amount of conventional comment regarding Brahms's seeming reluctance to publish symphonies in the era following Beethoven. In my own opinion if we want to understand the complex phenomenon that Brahms represents we need to clear our minds of Beethoven to a great extent and think back to Bach. In the first place Bach embodied a particularly and exclusively German musical tradition of musical craftsmanship involving a severe and rigorous intellectual technique. The Italian influence that was to sweep through German music for the next century and a half was already at work in the music of Bach's exact contemporary Handel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hillbank68 TOP 100 REVIEWER on 2 Mar 2007
Format: Audio CD
I remember Brahms' First Serenade being taken up in the 1960s by the LSO -that is when I first heard it. It is a very charming and delightful piece, full of energy and lyricism. It was written originally for chamber players - 10 instruments, that is, string quartet plus bass and flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon and horn. The parts were lost but they have been reconstructed. It's a version I'd like to hear. Here is the usual orchestral version. The piece is unbalanced in a way, with three movements of symphonic length and three much shorter ones, but every moment of it is a pleasure to listen to. This performance is good and does the music justice ; it misses greatness, but I'm not sure you really want that in this piece, in a funny kind of a way - it needs to be lively, well balanced and phrased and unaffected to succeed. The Second Serenade, in which violins are absent and the band is 'led' by the violas, is shorter but just as eloquent, and Tilson Thomas's performance again strikes the mark pretty well full on. This is an easy and inexpensive way of getting two lovely pieces faithfully presented, and it represents very good value musically and financially.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
GOOD VALUE AT LEAST 10 Feb 2011
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Brahms's two orchestral serenades fill a cd very well. Tilson Thomas adopts fairly brisk tempi in the 6-movement first serenade, and I suspect that if he had taken the more relaxed speeds favoured by Abbado with what I am learning to call the Berliner Philharmoniker he would have had to leave out the repeat in the first movement, which happily he does not do. In point of fact I find his account of the second serenade the more enjoyable of the two precisely because he seems more relaxed in it. In particular he lets the last movement go with its own natural easy swing rather than whipping it up at a furious pace in the way Toscanini used to do. In terms of the recorded sound, an issue from 2002 naturally puts Toscanini's 1942 recording (which may have been made in the notorious studio 8-H to judge by the dry-as-dust acoustic) in the shade, but it is not nearly as rich and immediate in its effect as Abbado's recording of the first serenade done in the 1980's. All in all, while I enjoyed this record I can't hear it as really a 5-star effort.

The liner note is quite informative up to a point, and as usual there is a fair amount of conventional comment regarding Brahms's seeming reluctance to publish symphonies in the era following Beethoven. In my own opinion if we want to understand the complex phenomenon that Brahms represents we need to clear our minds of Beethoven to a great extent and think back to Bach. In the first place Bach embodied a particularly and exclusively German musical tradition of musical craftsmanship involving a severe and rigorous intellectual technique. The Italian influence that was to sweep through German music for the next century and a half was already at work in the music of Bach's exact contemporary Handel. The romantic era saw a revival of a music that was again exclusively German, exemplified in different ways by Schumann and Wagner. 20 or more years younger than these, Brahms took on a role as custodian of the tradition that was already centuries old even in Bach's time and applied the same intellectual rigour to music that was out-and-out romantic in its expression and deeply innovative in idiom. The other side of the matter is that Brahms's output, like Bach's, is best viewed in totality rather than as individual 'works' as we might view Beethoven's. From the infinite quarry of pure and 'absolute' music Bach and Brahms carved out pieces that they presented separately. Some were larger and more elaborate, some smaller, but they are all made of the same stuff, and there is no 'light' music by these composers. There is nothing it can't express, but it is always the music that does the expressing, rarely or never with any admixture of feeling external to it, as was Beethoven's way. More than half the output of both Bach and Brahms is vocal music, but even here the words evoke from them an appropriate musical response, the music is not there to support the words.

That is how I listen to Brahms's serenades, not from any terminological viewpoint regarding what does or does not constitute a symphony, and entirely without any thought of Beethoven. Brahms was really a far clearer-headed man than Beethoven was. A struggle to achieve coherency was all part of Beethoven's unique greatness, for Brahms coherency was his birthright. To outward appearances he seems the archetypal 'classic'. I wonder to what extent there is any genuine widespread understanding of him, at least at the intellectual level, even yet.
Was this review helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback