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Serbia (Bradt Travel Guides) Paperback – 9 Jul 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides; 3 edition (9 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841623261
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841623269
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.7 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 516,669 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Laurence Mitchell was born in the English West Midlands but has spent most of his adult life based in Norwich, Norfolk. Formerly a geography teacher he first turned his hand to travel writing almost a decade ago. As well as the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk at his doorstep he is also drawn to overseas destinations that lie well off the beaten track - those places that Colin Thubron describes as the 'nerve-ends of the world': transition zones and cultural frontiers like Central Asia, the Balkans and the Caucasus region.

Product Description

Review

'A good introduction to the country.' The Independent

About the Author

Laurence Mitchell is a travel writer and photographer. He first visited Serbia in the 1970s when hitch-hiking through the former Yugoslavia. He is the author of Bradt's Kyrgyzstan.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Branislav Rabotic on 29 Mar 2005
Format: Paperback
While other and widely known publishers of travel literature hesitated to launch a guidebook on Serbia, people at the Bradt took advantage of being the first company to print such a guide in English, which by itself represents a policy that should be respected. The book is authored by Laurence Mitchell, and this is his first contribution to the Bradt guides. It is undoubtedly one of the most significant moments in the development of tourism in Serbia today. Good connoisseurs know very well how difficult and complicated Serbia is, or what might be the problems that the author had to solve while collecting data and checking out the situation on the spot. What is the outcome of such an effort?

First of all, the Bradt's Serbia is an amazingly informative, surprisingly accurate and incredibly honest book. The whole text is well structured and consists of 9 chapters, including background information on geography, history (by the way, the complicated, eventful and turbulent history of the Serbian nation has excellently been explained), Art and architecture, literature, even cinema and music. The author made use of additional 'boxes' throughout his book in order to focus the reader's attention on some more detailed explanations, such as biographies of various historical personalities, important events, local customs, offbeat attractions and sights, and the like. After paging through this book one almost feels intimately knowledgeable with Serbia's history, the people and culture.

Laurence Mitchell has shown remarkable insight into many aspects and literally all geographical regions of this country, offering to his readers and travelers alike not only a lot of valuable and practical information but also his sincere comments on some subject themes.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A G Wonsowski on 19 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
I have recently spent six weeks travelling around Serbia, and I quite simply couldn't have done it, or had so much fun doing it, without this guide. It's background information section is well-researched and accurate, especially when it comes to the history of a country still demonised and misunderstood. The guides to each region of Serbia, and of the cities to visit and what to do and see, are amazingly accurate and insightful; and his directions to hard to reach monasteries, churches and castles are unfaillingly accurate. If you are thinking of visiting this fantastic, and almost unknown, country, then this guide is the only one that provides you with all the information you will need to see and do all you want. I really can't stress enough how useful this guide was to me, and how will written and researched it is. The author's enthusiasm for Serbia is evident on every page, and I used it not only as a travel guide, but also for reading at leisure.
This is the best travel guide I have used for any country, and I can't recommend it highly enough.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nomad on 14 Feb 2007
Format: Paperback
I used this guide for travel in Serbia last year and found it extremely useful: a good balance of practical information and interesting background detail. I particularly liked the separate boxes that covered a wide range of Serbian topics from Tito to Turbo-folk. The author's obvious enthusiasm for the country is also worth mentioning, although he is not afraid of stern criticism where he feels it is appropriate.

Unfortunately,guidebooks inevitably go out of date quickly.In the case of the Serbia travel guide, the reason why there are no listings for Belgrade's hostels is that these had not been opened when the book was published.Most of the hostels did not open for business until summer 2005 or 2006, AFTER the book was published (I should know, as I stayed in some of them). In fact, the Lonely Planet 'Best of Belgrade' guide does not list these either and was not published until June 2006!

According to Amazon, a new edition of the Bradt guide will be available this summer so perhaps this matter will be addressed then. In the meantime, I heartily commend this edition of the guide.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Thompson on 12 Oct 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Unless you're looking for pages of glossy photos on every item, this book is going to do the business, even for a long trip to Serbia, which is lucky, because Bradt seem to have no challengers. I get the feeling that things are developing pretty quickly out there, so the sections on the large cities like Belgrade could probably do with pretty regular updates, but if the third edition arrives as soon as the second, it'll be out any time now.
Great care has been taken to give a fair overview of all the key sights, with handy galley pieces on background topics. This has been written by a regular visitor to Serbia, with a good knowledge of all of its regions. I don't think he's spent a lot of time in Belgrade's club scene, but he manages a few pointers nonetheless.
It's helpful that local names are given in both Latin and Cyrillic script, as the local street signs make no concessions yet for tourists. The maps are adequate, with a well judged level of detail, although there'll always be times when you could use more. If you need better maps, Google is a bit too random, but planplus.rs is a local service that seems to be reliable.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Branislav Rabotic on 7 Nov 2007
Format: Paperback
In the 2nd edition of his already excellent guidebook L. Mitchell has given a considerably enlarged, significantly improved and fully updated story about the country where I work as a licensed tourist guide and therefore I thought I knew it best.

To my surprise, I was able to discover in this book not only a great deal of practical information mainly useful for visitors and tourists alike, but also some really amazing, less known and unfamiliar stories about the country and its people.

The 2nd edition included expanded coverage on various background topics, such as Serbian cinema, literature and music, with boxes on Serbian personalities in these fields (for instance, Emir Kusturica or Ceca, an extravagant Balkan diva) as well as popular festivals like the annual Guca Trumpet Festival and EXIT. Many more boxes on subjects as diverse as the narrow gauge 'Sargan Eight' railway and curiosities like the 'Kremna Prophecies' and the 'Wild Man of Fruska Gora'. However, one of my favorite boxes is `Rocky comes to rescue of Serbian village' which really gives additional flavor to what is generally known or percieved about the Serbian mentality.

More information is also given on natural history and National Parks in Serbia.

I noticed as well that the author extended the listings, now including many of the new restaurants, cafes and bars and low-cost hostels that have opened for business in Belgrade in the last couple of years, along with privately run mid-range, luxury (`boutique') and hotels in the capital and beyond.
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