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Selenium 1.0 Testing Tools: Beginner's Guide
 
 

Selenium 1.0 Testing Tools: Beginner's Guide [Kindle Edition]

David Burns
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £24.99
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Product Description

Product Description

Written with a fast-paced but friendly and engaging approach, this Packt Beginner's Guide is designed to be placed alongside the computer as your guide and mentor. Step-by-step tutorials are bolstered by explanations of the reasoning behind what you are doing. You will quickly pick up the necessary skills, tips, and tricks for creating successful tests for your web applications with practical examples that help you to learn by experiment and play. If you are a Software quality assurance professional, software project manager, or software developer interested in developing automated testing in web based applications, then this book is definitely for you.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3177 KB
  • Print Length: 234 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (23 Nov 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005NI3AR4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #533,420 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

David is a Lead Software Engineer in Test at Mozilla. He is also a core developer on the Selenium project maintaining the Python bindings and helping work on the Firefox components of Selenium. He is a keen developer and tester loving to automate anything and everything he comes across.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Selenium 1.0 Test Tools: Beginners Guide 20 Mar 2011
Format:Paperback
Selenium 1.0 Testing Tools: Beginners Guide is exactly that. It is a book that is aimed at those who are beginners with the technology (not necessarily beginners to testing or coding). Overall, David Burns has written a good book here. The conversational style is helpful; you feel like you are talking to a team-mate who is explaining the system to you in a friendly and engaging manner. The exercises selected are of a level that you are eased into working with the technology and the tools. The first five chapters are dedicated to the Selenium IDE, which for many testers is all they will ever see of Selenium, and for many testers who want to automate front end tests on Firefox, it may be all they ever need. If that's the case, the first five chapters will give you a lot of practical information and give you some solidly ninja levels skills to write tests and make them robust and solid. They will be limited to the Selenese format, but even with that limitation, there's a lot of cool things that a tester can do, from declaring and using variables, calling JavaScript events, and managing for examining objects and creating robust tests to help enhance testing.

The second half of the book deals with Selenium Remote Control (RC) and here is where some deviation takes place, at least for me. First off, I did not have the exact environment described in this book. I was close, but I had some set-up differences that caused some headaches. A number of the examples in the book just flat out would not work for me. Since my environment was different than that recommended (a Windows 7 machine on a 64-bit Athlon processor), I can't hold David responsible for my roadblocks. It does, however, show a critical issue with the Learn by Doing format of this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too vague!! 28 Jun 2011
By Conor
Format:Paperback
This book is beneficial, but i found it quite vague, particularly around exercises, the author gives you the code to write a small exercise and then says to have a go at something a bit more difficult but doesn't give the answer to it anywhere, its just too vague. Luckily i could figure it out as i have used Selenium for a while but too a new user i think they may struggle with it.

Having said that there are some good tips in the book but in my opinion he needs to rewrite this with stronger exercises and with the solutions!!!! It was beneficial to me as i have used Selenium before!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good book 8 July 2012
By Fran
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
All the examples are made in Java, is not a problem, I'm not expert in java but...its ok. The author uses for the testing examples Eclipse or Idea, I dont remember exactly. Really the book is advanced....what I mean is that you need strong knowledges about unit testing, junit, phpunit, cunit....similar. If not, this book isn't so effective.
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Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uh...did anyone edit this? 18 May 2011
By Ethan S. Close - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have not reviewed a single book on Amazon up until now, but feel compelled to do so for this book. After reading "JUnit in Action", "Head First Java", and "Professional Android Application Development" (all excellent), this book felt like it was written by people who had never read a book on programming or software, nor hired any editorial staff whatsoever.

Although they do cover many of the main topics of Selenium and it is an introduction to the testing framework, that's where its resemblance to a textbook ends. The language is unclear. Examples are poorly explained and contain errors. The general layout of the book is not intuitive. They do not go into any depth with each main concept at all. In sections of the book they restate the previously explained points or include duplication of code for the sake of lengthening the book - seriously. It's as if they were writing a secondary school paper that had to be 200 pages long and they just made it. It could have been 50 pages shorter.

Like the Selenium project, this book should be open source. I would rather have my money back, be able to read it online for free, and submit edits. Everyone would benefit. If you are new to programming, read up on Javascript and read all online Selenium documents before reading this book, otherwise it may be a waste of time - or worse, scare you away from using Selenium at all. If you already know Selenium pretty well and are a novice programmer, you'll get useful information from it, but be saddened by it's lack of quality. I wish there were something better. Maybe I should start writing.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Already dated 5 May 2011
By GameMaker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The problem with this book is on Selenium 1, and it apparently came out just when Selenium 2 was coming out. Fortunately Selenium 2 seems to be pretty well backwardly compatible, so you can use what is presented in the book, but the bad news is that it contains only a tiny bit of Selenium 2 content, so it is already pretty dated. I think the publisher should have just waited a month or two and made it a Selenium 2 book.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Selenium 1.0 Test Tools: Beginners Guide 20 Mar 2011
By Michael Larsen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Selenium 1.0 Testing Tools: Beginners Guide is exactly that. It is a book that is aimed at those who are beginners with the technology (not necessarily beginners to testing or coding). Overall, David Burns has written a good book here. The conversational style is helpful; you feel like you are talking to a team-mate who is explaining the system to you in a friendly and engaging manner. The exercises selected are of a level that you are eased into working with the technology and the tools. The first five chapters are dedicated to the Selenium IDE, which for many testers is all they will ever see of Selenium, and for many testers who want to automate front end tests on Firefox, it may be all they ever need. If that's the case, the first five chapters will give you a lot of practical information and give you some solidly ninja levels skills to write tests and make them robust and solid. They will be limited to the Selenese format, but even with that limitation, there's a lot of cool things that a tester can do, from declaring and using variables, calling JavaScript events, and managing for examining objects and creating robust tests to help enhance testing.

The second half of the book deals with Selenium Remote Control (RC) and here is where some deviation takes place, at least for me. First off, I did not have the exact environment described in this book. I was close, but I had some set-up differences that caused some headaches. A number of the examples in the book just flat out would not work for me. Since my environment was different than that recommended (a Windows 7 machine on a 64-bit Athlon processor), I can't hold David responsible for my roadblocks. It does, however, show a critical issue with the Learn by Doing format of this book. If everything is the same, the format is terrific, and the first 6 chapters I was able to accomplish most of the project objectives and practice using the tools as listed. When I found myself stuck, there was little I could do to get around the issues. Be aware of that going in, your mileage may vary with the examples shown in the book.

Another frustration I had was specifically in Chapter 7, which dealt with writing your own scripts in Selenium RC. The chapter is structured around using the IntelliJ Idea Java IDE. In and of itself, this is not a bad practice, but when things start to not line up due to environments being different, adding an IDE into the mix can add even more complications and details to keep track of. While I appreciated the clean nature of integrating JUnit and the Selenium libraries under one roof, it added another layer that I personally felt might have been better handled by not including another tool. Agreed, CLI's are not sexy and they require repetition that the IDE doesn't, but I would have appreciated more specific examples and more complete examples. As it is, to get around the behaviors I was seeing, I generated tests in the IDE, saved the structure as a separate file, and then loaded that file to write my tests.

Again, these criticisms are actually pretty minor, and they are colored because my own environment had trouble with the examples (of which David states that 64 bit environments will have issues). Overall, this is a great first effort in describing the tools and the methods involved in loading, installing, and working with the Selenium stack. As the technology becomes more well known and solidifies, I'd like to see what David does with a future Selenium treatment. There's a lot of gold in here, and a few pieces of pyrite (and again, I have to take responsibility for my own panning), but all in all it fills a void for documentation for Selenium with a continuity that a beginner can appreciate and get productive with quickly.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book for the Selenium IDE 20 Aug 2011
By Burke - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Yes, Selenium 2.0 is available, but everything you learn from this book carries forward.

This is a good book for learning the Selenium IDE, and "Selenese." If you're a java developer who wants to learn the Selenium API, I'd recommend "Selenium Simplified"
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for learning the IDE 28 Dec 2012
By Anonymous - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If your goal is to learn the IDE, then I would recommend this book. It gives information on commands that I did not find covered in on-line courses. I found the exercises to be clear and very valuable.
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