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Selected Works RD Laing: Self & Other V2 (Selected Works of R.D. Laing, 2)
 
 

Selected Works RD Laing: Self & Other V2 (Selected Works of R.D. Laing, 2) [Kindle Edition]

R D Laing
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Published in the year 2002, Selected Works RD Laing: Self & Other V2 is a valuable contribution to the field of Major Works.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2233 KB
  • Print Length: 192 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0415198194
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 4 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Routledge; Reprint edition (11 Jan 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FBFKJA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #987,799 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Last Truth 24 April 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Ten,academic but accessible, essays dealing with interpersonal experience and interpersonal action.The subjects considered relate to unconscious pretence,phantasy and the effects of collusion and disconfirmation in interpersonal relationships.
Despite being written in the sixties it deals with timeless issues,and is an unsettling disclosure on the methods employed to combat ontological insecurity and the games we play with ourselves that sustain false-selves through self-betrayal.It is particularly applicable to the present situation, whereby the constant pressures of covert advertising enforces the false-self and fosters a situation whereby people lose the distinction between actuality and pretence, and are drawn into interactive scenarios where they confirm each others falsity.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very worthwhile book. 29 July 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you rate RD Laing's approach to mental health this is a must to read.An important work along with his other works.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Master the Keys 10 Jun 2010
By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 100 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
R D Laing innovator pioneer and provides a long thread of self realisation and the eventual self liberation. This is one torchlight experience on the parade to human freedom. It is a small deceptive book, penetrating hard. Unconscious experience; How can you have an experience you are unaware of? Laing posits an existential point that tips up therapy.

He then makes the case for understanding emotional connection through dialogue with a patient/client/person. Finding out their internal meaning rather than casting a diagnostic framework is key to a will to health. The opposite is the pre-determined doctor diagnosis, good if you have a specific physical condition but not in explaining how it has accrued. Eschewing the unconscious experience which only the therapist can unravel he brings out the real narrative.

Elusion; the process of imagining oneself away, only to wish oneself back again, but this time, as a grafted-on experience rather than a beam from the inner core. Another nod to the Marxist conception of alienation. The false self identity masters experience and then subdues it rather than imbibing and then radiating the moment within a dialectical expression of joy/sadness. The result is the present pre-occupation of living within in a promised future or a schmaltz ridden past. The present is pure disillusionment.

Phantasies are conjured and maintained, with particular emphasis on issues relating to St. Onan.

Working therapeutically with people diagnosed as schizophrenics this book has assisted, not in a Haynes manual dissassembling a motorbike sort of way, but to work with them to ensure grounding is undertaken to unravel their life stories.
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Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good read 27 Feb 2006
By joseph peterson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I was pleasantly surprised by this book. It looked so unassuming at the library and so ancient with it's old dust jacket, but this book is another timeless work, by someone I wish I had come into contact with in my early twenties as opposed to now in my thirties. This book shows people in very easy to understand language how Schizophrenia actually happens and how people often use "difference" to equate with wrong or right thinking. He shows how Cartesian Dualism fails to address the real underlying problems at hand in interpersonal relationships. The self defines itself through the eyes of others and can constantly feel the need for justification of importance or merit to the point of irrationality. But also that others can come to associate the irrationality as something wrong or immoral about the person as opposed to a disorder the self is just completely unconscious of. In other words the person comes to believe that they are in and of themselves wrong or right based on their interactions with other people and begin to define themselves opposite to anything they feel is not their self in order to feel right or prove someone elses falsity. This places the individual in a "untenable" position. They are no more an actor upon themselves but constantly re-evaluating everyone around them in order to try to escape this position, what they fail to realize is that no escape is possible and that life can present unanswerable conditions. Often the person going through this experience will feel as though they are unable to decide what is right or wrong for themselves. This leads to a sort of paranoia of the sort that nobody likes them or that nobody thinks about them and they project the image that they could care less about what anyone else thinks about them. There seems to be a sort of thrashing about and rehashing of thoughts with an inability to relate to others and alienation sets in. The book uses many literature examples of untenable positions as well as psychiatric situations and recordings to illustrate the process of the mind of someone dealing with schizophrenia and the inability of the disorder to exist outside of a relation to others. I still liked Politics of Experience more but this book is highly recommended as well.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gem 16 Mar 2009
By Christopher Richards - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Note: This review is based on the paperback. With examples from clinical experience and theory, existential literature, fine art, and children's stories, R. D. Laing illustrates how the pressures of conformity act upon individuals in our society. Each of us is constantly influenced by others as we influence them. Authority figures judge others and create realities for both themselves and those being judged.

The book affirms a personal world. It debunks the idea that phantasy can be observed by another as a series of facts. Phantasy, an object relations term intentionally not spelled with an `f,' is the real experience of a subject. A social phantasy is an internalized experience by a group. For example, a dominant group phantasy is that the therapist has the `answers.' We can think of this as `expertise phantasy'. If only the patient could find the answer he would cease to suffer.

One person can only infer through language and gesture what the experience of another can be. Laing said elsewhere: I cannot experience your experience.

We must tolerate ambiguity and paradox. Laing cites the teachings of Hsi Yun, a Zen Master of about 840 A.D: "That the real difficulty is not so much in his questions being unanswerable as in his continuing in the state of mind that leads him to ask them."

Selves for Liang can be either authentic or false. False selves are an adaptation to false realities. Laing explores and illustrates everyday untenable situations, identity, attribution, pretense, elusion, delusion, and collusion.

This is well worth reading. I read it first at age 17 and didn't understand it well. Forty years later it makes for better reading. It's a gem.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE CONTROVERSIAL PSYCHIATRIST LOOKS AT THE "PSYCHOTIC," etc. 7 Aug 2013
By Steven H. Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Ronald David Laing (1927-1989) was a Scottish psychiatrist who was often considered part of the anti-psychiatry movement (although he rejected this characterization); he wrote many other books such as Politics of Experience, The politics of the family and other essays, etc. He wrote in the Preface to the First 1961 Edition [revised edition, 1969], "I shall try to depict persons within a social system or 'nexus' of persons, in order to try to understand some of the ways in which each affects each person's experience of himself and of how interaction takes form. Each contributes to the other's fulfillment or destruction." (Pg. xi)

He begins by saying, "is unconscious phantasy a mode or a type of experience? If it is, it is with a difference. If not, what is it, if not a figment of imagination? The psychoanalytic thesis can be stated thus: it is not POSSIBLE to prove the existence of unconscious phantasy to the person who is immersed in it. Unconscious phantasy can be known to be phantasy only after the person's own emergence from it." (Pg. 3)

He asks, "Is it a contradiction in terms to speak of 'unconscious experience'? A person's experience comprises anything that 'he' or 'any part of him' is aware of, whether 'he' or every part of him is aware of every level of his awareness or not. His experiences are inner or outer; of his own body or of other person's bodies; real or unreal; private or shared. The psychoanalytic contention is that our desires present themselves to us in our experience, but we may not recognize them. This is one sense in which we are unconscious of our experience. We misconstrue it." (Pg. 8)

He observes, "Some 'psychotics' look on psychoanalysis as a relatively safe place to tell someone what they really think. They are prepared to play at being a patient and even to keep up the charade by PAYING the analyst, provided he does not 'cure' them. They are even prepared to pretend to be cured if it will look bad for him if he is having a run of people who do not seem to be getting better. Not an unreasonable contract." (Pg. 28)

He suggests, "the man-in-the-street takes a lot for granted: for instance, that he has a body which has an inside and an outside... The ordinary person does not reflect upon these basic elements of his being; he takes his way iof experiencing himself and others to be 'true.' However, some people do not. They are often called schizoid. Still more, the schizophrenic does not take for granted his own person... he lacks the usual sense of personal unity, a sense of himself as the agent of his own actions rather than as a robot, a machine, a thing, and of being the author of his own perceptions, but rather feels that someone else is using his eyes, his ears, etc." (Pg. 35-36)

He argues, "The most significant theoretical and methodological development in the psychiatry of the last two decades is, in my view, the growing dissatisfaction with any theory or study of the individual which isolates him from his context. Efforts have been made from different angles to remedy this position." (Pg. 65) He asserts, "One basic function of genuinely analytical or existential therapy is the provision of a setting in which as little as possible impedes each person's capacity to discover his own self... A large part of the art of therapy is in the tact and lucidity with which the analyst points out the ways in which collusion maintains illusions or disguises delusions." (Pg. 105)

Laing is not the highly controversial and polarizing figure he once was; with the passage of time, one can more easily appreciate what he had to say.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Short Discussion of Human Personality 14 Dec 2012
By Joel S. Ward - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I am generally unfamiliar with R.D. Laings collection of work but this small book contains some fascinating discussions regarding the problem of personality and how "selfhood" is generated socially and psychologically. I particularly benefited from his discussion of schizophrenic patients and the traits that they exhibit preventing them from communicating effectively with others. What is most fascinating is that schizophrenia, in communication terms, is just a gross amplification of communicative incompetency directly related to a person being unable to live within themselves and having to always find on the outside personalities that confirm position. An excellent book if you are interested in problems of personhood and the gray line between sanity and psychosis.
5.0 out of 5 stars THE CONTROVERSIAL PSYCHIATRIST LOOKS AT THE "PSYCHOTIC," etc. 7 Aug 2013
By Steven H. Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Ronald David Laing (1927-1989) was a Scottish psychiatrist who was often considered part of the anti-psychiatry movement (although he rejected this characterization); he wrote many other books such as Politics of Experience, The politics of the family and other essays, etc. He wrote in the Preface to the First 1961 Edition [revised edition, 1969], "I shall try to depict persons within a social system or 'nexus' of persons, in order to try to understand some of the ways in which each affects each person's experience of himself and of how interaction takes form. Each contributes to the other's fulfillment or destruction." (Pg. xi)

He begins by saying, "is unconscious phantasy a mode or a type of experience? If it is, it is with a difference. If not, what is it, if not a figment of imagination? The psychoanalytic thesis can be stated thus: it is not POSSIBLE to prove the existence of unconscious phantasy to the person who is immersed in it. Unconscious phantasy can be known to be phantasy only after the person's own emergence from it." (Pg. 3)

He asks, "Is it a contradiction in terms to speak of 'unconscious experience'? A person's experience comprises anything that 'he' or 'any part of him' is aware of, whether 'he' or every part of him is aware of every level of his awareness or not. His experiences are inner or outer; of his own body or of other person's bodies; real or unreal; private or shared. The psychoanalytic contention is that our desires present themselves to us in our experience, but we may not recognize them. This is one sense in which we are unconscious of our experience. We misconstrue it." (Pg. 8)

He observes, "Some 'psychotics' look on psychoanalysis as a relatively safe place to tell someone what they really think. They are prepared to play at being a patient and even to keep up the charade by PAYING the analyst, provided he does not 'cure' them. They are even prepared to pretend to be cured if it will look bad for him if he is having a run of people who do not seem to be getting better. Not an unreasonable contract." (Pg. 28)

He suggests, "the man-in-the-street takes a lot for granted: for instance, that he has a body which has an inside and an outside... The ordinary person does not reflect upon these basic elements of his being; he takes his way iof experiencing himself and others to be 'true.' However, some people do not. They are often called schizoid. Still more, the schizophrenic does not take for granted his own person... he lacks the usual sense of personal unity, a sense of himself as the agent of his own actions rather than as a robot, a machine, a thing, and of being the author of his own perceptions, but rather feels that someone else is using his eyes, his ears, etc." (Pg. 35-36)

He argues, "The most significant theoretical and methodological development in the psychiatry of the last two decades is, in my view, the growing dissatisfaction with any theory or study of the individual which isolates him from his context. Efforts have been made from different angles to remedy this position." (Pg. 65) He asserts, "One basic function of genuinely analytical or existential therapy is the provision of a setting in which as little as possible impedes each person's capacity to discover his own self... A large part of the art of therapy is in the tact and lucidity with which the analyst points out the ways in which collusion maintains illusions or disguises delusions." (Pg. 105)

Laing is not the highly controversial and polarizing figure he once was; with the passage of time, one can more easily appreciate what he had to say.
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