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Selected Stories (Wordsworth Classics) Paperback – 5 Mar 1996

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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions; New Ed edition (5 Mar. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853262889
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853262883
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 12.7 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 52,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born in 1860 in Taganrog, a
port in southern Russia. His father was a former serf. In 1879, after
receiving a classical education at the Taganrog Gymnasium, he
moved to Moscow to study medicine. During his university years he
helped support his family by writing stories and sketches for
humorous magazines. By 1888 he was contributing to Russia's most
prestigious literary journals and regarded as a major writer. He also
started writing plays: his first full-length play, Ivanov, was produced
in 1887. After undertaking a journey to visit the penal colony on the
Siberian island of Sakhalin in 1890, he settled on a country estate
outside Moscow, where he continued to write and practise medicine.
His failing health forced him to move to Yalta in 1898, where he
wrote his most famous short story, 'The Lady with the Little Dog'
(1899), and two of his best-known plays: Three Sisters (1901) and
The Cherry Orchard (1904), written with Stanislavsky's Moscow Art
Theatre in mind. In 1901 he married the company's leading actress,
Olga Knipper. He died from tuberculosis in Badenweiler, Germany,
in July 1904 at the age of 44.

Product Description

About the Author

With an Introduction and Notes by Joe Andrew, Professor of Russian Literature, Keele University

Inside This Book

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Sally Wilton VINE VOICE on 27 Dec. 2007
Format: Paperback
Deep snow, blizzards, isolated inns peopled by swaddled babouchkas holding oil lamps, peeking through frosted window panes. Lonely train stations on the route to somewhere, peasants in 'straw shoes' driving horse and carts to remote places at the dead of night. An era when the horse was prized as the only way to get from place to place. If you like this evocative background you will like these stories. At only £1.99 and a handy little book you can put in your pocket it is a great travel companion, ideally for the trans siberian railway in the middle of winter. 24 stories and my favourite is 'Champagne' as true today as ever and the same story is repeated in a different format every week in the News of the World. I read that one 3 times.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Andrews on 13 July 2011
Format: Paperback
the beauty of Checkov's short stories is that they approach a complex topic but not entirely so. Sometimes in fact they approach a quite simple side of human nature - I read this during two insane 10 hour bus trips to Stockholm from the snowy north of Sweden and it was certainly a great way to while the hours of travelling.

read a story...look out the window... repeat
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. C. E. Mclean on 8 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
The subtlety and Delicacy fo Chekhov's writing disappeared in the really crude translation. OK the book is very cheap but you might do better to pay a bit more and get nearer to what the writer really intended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By L. Davidson VINE VOICE on 13 April 2012
Format: Paperback
I picked this little book up at a give away price in a bookshop. I try to sample books by authors of "classics" regularly to broaden the mind and increase my general knowledge. This book consists of a large number of short stories , most only 5 or 6 pages long , which together convey a flavour of life in rural Russia in the late 1800's. A lot of the stories are set in snow storms and muddy roads and many feature peasants and petty bourgeois figures from small towns and villages. A lot of these little vignettes are interesting and fairly easy to read but some are not so. Some of the stories are whimsical, others contain moral lessons as God appeared to be still widely feared in this environment at this time, a few decades prior to the Bolshevik revolution in 1917. If I were to pick out a favourite story , it would probably be "Not Wanted", a tale of family life where the wife and mother shows more interest in her friends from the amateur dramatics society than her poor husband and young child. The longest story is "In The Ravine", a disturbing tale of infanticide carried out by the one true villain in this compendium ; a real nasty bitch of the highest order. After reading this book I would be quite happy to read more of Chekhov's works in the future.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Hopper TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Despite the full title, these are not really full stories for the most part. Indeed, there are 24 stories in 180 pages. They are, as the sub-title says, stories of Russian life; or, more specifically, they are sketches or vignettes, many only 3-5 pages, depicting a wide range of Russian characters. As such, although mostly comically engaging and sometimes tragic, few really stand out, the ones doing so most for me being At Home, about a father's relationship with his seven year old son, and the tragic conclusion to In the Ravine.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. J. Read on 8 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
The great thing about Chekov, is the accesibility and simplicity. He can write a story, seemingly about anybody, in any social class, age etc, and make it believable. While he does this he often paints a bleak image of both Russia, and those who populated it. Although he was certainly more famous for his plays which aided the ressurection of theatre, his short stories were equally compelling.
It is an ideal book for travelling, some of the stories (and there are 24), are merely a couple of pages long. The longest (and most poignant) is 'The Ravine', the final story. Though he appears only to be narrating a simple story, such themes come through as the greed of the petty bougeous (though he wrote before Marx coined that term), and the manner of which they treat the lowly proletariat.
This is an ideal introudction to a writer long underappreciated in this country. Perhaps this is due to his nationality, or the manner in which he leaves any 'action' of the story to the imagination. He is a neglected master, one who has made the short story an art form. In an age when publishers refuse short story collections, it is a reminder that they have more to offer than mere horror.
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