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Sefronia


Price: £9.73 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£9.73 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 4 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Frequently Bought Together

Sefronia + Look At The Fool + Greetings From L.A.
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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 April 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Manifesto
  • ASIN: B000005DDZ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,547 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Dolphins 3:12£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Honey Man 4:12£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Because of You 4:28£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Peanut Man 2:53£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Martha 3:18£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Quicksand 3:25£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. I Know I'd Recognize Your Face 4:01£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Stone In Love 3:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Sefronia-After Asklopiades, After Kafka 3:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Sefronia-The King's Chain 2:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Sally Go 'Round The Roses 3:42£0.79  Buy MP3 

Product Description

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Amazon.co.uk

After the lacklustre response to his groundbreaking early 1970s albums, Tim Buckley was forced back to the drawing board. His second attempt at a comeback was the over-egged Sefronia. Produced by pop producer, Denny Randell, this 11-track album did nothing to rescue his critical reputation. It's clear from the outset that Buckley was not really on peak form. Apparently suffering from a cold at the time, his much-loved voice wasn't at his best and this collection of ballads is made even more frustrating by the occasional flashes of inspiration. Overall, the tracks, which include an interesting choice of covers (Fred Neil's "Dolphins" and Tom Wait's "Martha"), are too submerged in Randell's slick production to really shine. Pedestrian, rather than otherworldly, it undoubtedly takes a while for the listener to feel at home here. However it's not easy: his distinctiveness was waning and the material doesn't really cut it. When his ramshackle muse does hang together, like on the evocative, "Quicksand" and the sweet "I Know I'd Recognise Your Face", we're almost in Happy/Sad territory but overall the songs (bar the covers) aren't worthy of the voice of that blood and blues-scarred past. --Reuben Dessay

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By pikeyboy on 2 Mar. 2008
Format: Audio CD
There will always be two schools of thought surrounding the recorded output of TB. Those who eschew out-of-hand all of his latter, sub-commercial trio of releases (i.e. Greetings From LA, Sefronia, and Look At The Fool) in favour of the more stoned escapades of Lorca, Starsailor, Blue Afternoon, etc. But there are those of us who love every aspect of the great minstrel, and why not? There will never be another like him. Personally, I think Sefronia is a great album, though flawed. Certainly, he nails Dolphins perfectly, rearranging Fred Neil's verses into what is arguably a more coherent song, and his version of Martha is better than any other I've heard, and that includes Tom Waits' own. As for the seemingly contentious I Know I'd Recognize Your Face - I love that song! It may not be classic, mouldbreaking Buckley, but what do you expect? Can't a man try something different every now and again? Nobody has mentioned that besides being about unpaid alimony, etc., the song is about a draft-dodger from the Vietnam conflict, and in that context sits well alongside others such as Nighthawkin', Make It Right, Peanut Man, Sally Go Round The Roses, Bring It On Up, Freeway Blues, and so on. The album was recorded during a period of social upheaval in the US (i.e. when the soldiers were being repatriated) and like Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, the latter period of TB reflects very much this change of national mood. Buckley had done introspection better than anyone, but you can't live in a bubble forever. Whichever way you see it, this was a new direction for Buckley. You also have to remember that, as great as we view albums like Lorca and Starsailor in hindsight, they buttered no parsnips as far as Tim was concerned ("Hey! your record's great! I wouldn't buy it though!" - you know?).Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. Hands on 4 Jan. 2004
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps I was a little harsh when I reviewed this album in November of 2003.
Although it will never be my favourite Buckley album (Happy Sad and Lorca are in a continuous battle for that position) I think I was a bit cruel by giving it only two stars, although I still can't listen to Martha or I Know I'd Recognise Your Face.
If it's true that he had a cold when recording the album then I wish I sounded that good at any time, ill or not! The production still detracts from the music a little but I have learned to ignore it and appreciate the brilliant songs hiding underneath. As a friend pointed out to me after I made a comment about producer Denny Rendell being shot, Buckley himself never kicked up a fuss about it being so bad, perhaps because of his dalliances with heroin at the time.
I do think it's worth hunting down The Dream Belongs To Me because it features demo recordings that Buckley made before the sessions for Sefronia. You can hear the songs in a much rawer state with much more of the Buckley spirit, his voice being used as the fantastic instrument that it was.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GlynLuke TOP 100 REVIEWER on 22 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD
It is a truth universally acknowledged, that Sefronia is Tim`s worst album (except
for those who think Look at the Fool or Starsailor take that dubious accolade).
I don`t think he made `worst` albums, only one or two less good ones.
What Sefronia doesn`t quite have is the coherence of his best work - Happy Sad, Blue Afternoon, Look at the Fool - but there`s enough here for the Buckley buff to indulge his passions.
If I`ve erred on the side of generosity in giving this 4 stars, may I present as evidence four songs which show this great singer at his magisterial best. Dolphins is a Fred Neil song (once also covered nicely by the band It`s a Beautiful Day) that gives Tim a chance to show off his vocal chops on an enigmatic, slowish ballad which may just be one of his finest moments; Honey Man is Tim the falsetto voiced ladykiller, on an insidiously soulful number typical of the way in which his music was developing; and the gorgeous Martha, by Buckley fan and friend Tom Waits, is an earnestly sung orchestral song with a tempo shift on the chorus that moves me almost to tears each time I hear it. It`s an edited version of Waits` original (which I don`t think TW had even recorded yet at that stage) with fewer verses and an even more romantic feel. Then there`s the enjoyably daft Peanut Man, which perhaps presages the kind of upbeat follies the similarly unpredictable Paolo Nutini indulges in today.
There are one or two forgettable tracks, it`s true - Because of You and Stone in Love for example; and the two-part title track seems to have strayed in from another, earlier album. As for the duet with one Marcia Waldorf on I Know I`d Recognize Your Face, unlike some reviewers I`ve always rather liked it.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By manchester man on 8 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
dear me...am i the only reviewer to give 5 stars...bold and inspiring...powerful...rich in voice...mysterious and intriguing...unique...there will never be another like this...just count your blessings you can listen to it.
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Format: Audio CD
After hearing Tim Buckley for the first time I have striven to own everything I can get my hands on. Of his studio albums there are only two not in my collection: Look At The Fool (just haven't got round to buying it yet) and Starsailor (why oh why is this still unavailable? What I have heard is fantastic).
I'd heard that after Greetings From LA Buckley went downhill a little, and after the first play of this album I wondered where the Tim Buckley that had written such great albums as Lorca, Happy Sad and Blue Afternoon had gone. I wondered what was it that made Greetings From LA a good album and Sefronia almost unbearable?
There are several answers to this. All the songs suffer from over-production, there's too much going on at once. Buckley's voice, whilst still amazing doesn't shine. On Greetings From LA (as on many of his other albums) Buckley's voice is used as an instrument. He shrieks and wails to the best of his ability, perfectly fitting for the suggestive content of the lyrics. However on Sefronia his voice is merely a voice and the album suffers because of this.
Song-wise the cover of Fred Neil's Dolphins is great, Honey Man is one of the best songs on the album (although I've heard it performed better live). As the reviewer before me stated, Peanut Man is fun and I Know I'd Recognise Your Face is awful. Although this album has grown on me after listening a few more times I still can't listen to that one. All in all the problem is that Buckley seems to have lost his way, lost his soul by trying to do something to please others and not himself.
If I was forced to pick the best track on the album I too would go for the two-part Sefronia. Here the Buckley that I thought had disappeared re-emerges a little, revelling in his 'weirdness'.
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