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Seeing Voices Paperback – 25 Jan 1991


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New edition edition (25 Jan 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330320904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330320900
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 1.3 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 696,847 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Oliver Sacks was born in London and educated in London, Oxford, California and New York. He now lives in America and practices neurology in New York, where he is also a professor of clinical neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is the author of ten books, including the bestselling The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Awakenings. His most recent book, Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain was an international bestseller. He has received numerous awards for his writing, including the Hawthornden Prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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Review

"This book will shake your preconceptions about the deaf, about language and about thought--. Sacks [is] one of the finest and most thoughtful writers of our time."--"Los Angeles Times Book Review""Fascinating and richly rewarding--. Sacks is a profoundly wise observer."--"The Plain Dealer""One cannot read more than a few pages of Sacks without seeing something in a new way. His breadth of understanding and expression seems limitless."--"Kansas City Star""A remarkable book, penetrating, subtle, persuasive--. [It] will likely become a classic."--"St. Louis Post-Dispatch" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of many books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Awakenings (which inspired the Oscar-nominated film) and Musicophilia. Born in London and educated at Oxford, he now lives in New York City, where he is Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry at Columbia University. He is the first, and only, Columbia University Artist, and is also a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. In 2008, he was appointed Commander of the British Empire.

For more information, visit www.oliversacks.com

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Feb 1998
Format: Paperback
I loved this book and could have wished it twice as long. However, a friend to whom I recommended the book didn't think that highly of it. So to be honest, I guess this book isn't for everyone. It is true that particularly in this book, Sacks gets carried away by lots of long footnotes printed at the bottom of the pages. For me, reading them was like exploring every nook and cranny of a great cathedral. Absolutely enthralling. But for others, it may prove to be rather distracting. If you have ever pondered the endlessly fascinating relationship of language to thinking, you will like this book.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Simon Southwell on 3 Jun 2003
Format: Paperback
I once saw a documentary about a couple whose daughter was deaf, and they were agonizing about whether to go ahead and have a complex and risky procedure performed which might restore some hearing for their child. I couldn't understand why the father's brother, who was himself profoundly deaf, was so upset that they were even considering this operation.
Having read Oliver Sacks' book, I now have a much greater understanding of how intensely proud deaf people are of their culture. The book describes much of the history of the deaf communities' language and struggle for identity. It reads like a history of a nation struggling for recognition of its rich culture and language. The book also gives many insights into deafness and its causes too, and describes sign language as a fully formed language (or languages!), as rich as any spoken form, but with a quality quite different. It becomes quite clear in the book that deaf people don't necessarily consider themselves 'ill' or 'disabled', but have a human condition which is simply different. This is perhaps why the uncle of the deaf girl in the documentary was upset by his brother's actions---it might be perceived as a kind of prejudice.
I would recommend this book to anyone who is simply interested other cultures, or perhaps just curious about a different human experience which can't be fully imagined if one is not deaf, but still some understanding and appreciation might be gained.
As ever, this Oliver Sacks book is easy to read, like his other popular accounts, and he is not just a passive observer but has many personal tales of his contacts with deaf people, their views and his relationships with them.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 April 1998
Format: Paperback
I love Oliver Sacks's writing because of his excitement, even his passion that he brings to his subjects. In every book of his that I have read, he has infected me with his sense of amazement at the puzzles of the human brain. Even after studying neurology I learned a lot about deafness and language from this book. However, I found the writing to be redundant and the editing to be poor. When he started to repeat the same ideas over and over again I started wondering whether this book had not originally been just a long article for the New York Review of Books. Moreover, many of the most interesting ideas were relegated to the footnotes and this made for very choppy reading. In short, I will always remain a big fan of Oliver Sacks, but I think his writing has improved a lot since he wrote this and I sure won't miss the footnotes if he leaves them out of his next book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz TOP 500 REVIEWER on 17 Jun 2011
Format: Paperback
Most of the information that we get about the world comes through the sense of sight. Therefore it would seem that it there is one sense that we would be loath to part with, it would be this one. And yet, it is the sense of hearing that has the greatest impact on the acquisition of language and subsequently on the formation of our minds. If we don't acquire language really early on in our lives, we are bound to lead a very limited existence as compared to most other people. It is these facts and some other very deep and important ones that I was able to gather from this Oliver Sacks book. It really opened my mind to the world of deaf people in a profoundly different way. Sacks documents various attempts over the last few centuries to give deaf people a chance to acquire a sign language, and different approaches to the education of the deaf. The book also opened my eyes to the fact that the sign language is a real language, qualitatively and profoundly different from simple gesticulations and gestures that we engage on a daily basis in our regular communications. In fact, the sign language is in one sense much more complex than the regular spoken language. One can argue that the spoken language is one-dimensional - it consists of sounds of different pitch and duration in time. On the other hand, the sign language is four-dimensional - it employs all three dimensions of space to create various hand configurations and adds an extra layer in the form of motion.

One of the greatest features of Olives Sacks' writing is the highly sophisticated and literary style that he employs. I would love reading his books even if he were describing the content of a box of cereal. We are fortunate that his writing brilliance is matched with the vast knowledge and expertise that he has in neuroscience. It is this incredible combination of writing and scientific talent that makes each of his books a masterpiece.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Oliver Sacks wrote this book in 1989. In his preface he writes that three years before he "knew nothing of the situation of the deaf". So this book is in many ways a chronicle of Sacks' own journey of discovery. Its main thesis is that the signing used by deaf people is indeed a fully fledged language with its own grammar and catalogue of nuances and styles. So, for example, if two or more deaf-signing people meet who have no spoken or written language in common, say American and Japanese (his example), within a day or two they are communicating fluently. The second half of the book, a chapter titled "The Revolution of the Deaf", is devoted to tracking a "revolution" at a university for deaf students who insist that the top academic positions should be occupied by deaf academics. Oliver Sacks champions this cause, becoming, to my mind, a touch uncomfortably evangelical: does he lose some objectivity? Nonetheless, "Seeing Voices" displays Sacks' trademark combination of compassion and deeply analytical insight.
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