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Seeds of Wealth: Four Plants that Made Men Rich [Kindle Edition]

Henry Hobhouse
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new industries and changed the course of history.

Ancient Rome's monopoly on wine production had huge economic and hygienic importance. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms. Tobacco has largely been condemned for its effects on health and its true role in history ignored. Tobacco has often been used in place of currency and its growth in Virginia supported a colony that produced much of the talent that made Independence possible. Timber shortages led the British Royal Navy to become dependent on American timber. The dearth of timber drove English coal mines deep, which led to the steam pumps, steam engines, and ultimately the Industrial Revolution.

These are fascinating stories the effect of minutiae on the great waves of history.

'You cannot help but admire and enjoy the company of a man who takes such a novel and global view of history' Spectator


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Book Description

Henry Hobhouse was the first to recognise plants as a causal factor in history in his Seeds of Wealth. In this new book, he examines four plants: rubber, timber, tobacco and the wine grape, each of which enormously increased the wealth of those who dealt in them, created great new industries and changed the course of history. Ancient Rome's monopoly on wine production had huge economic and hygienic importance. Without rubber, there would have been no development of cars, buses and trucks, bicycles, waterproof clothing or even tennis balls and condoms. Tobacco has largely been condemned for its effects on health and its true role in history ignored. Tobacco has often been used in place of currency and its growth in Virginia supported a colony that produced much of the talent that made Independence possible. Timber shortages led the British Royal Navy to become dependent on American timber. The dearth of timber drove English coal mines deep, which led to the steam pumps, steam engines, and ultimately the Industrial Revolution. These are fascinating stories the effect of minutiae on the great waves of history. 'You cannot help but admire and enjoy the company of a man who takes such a novel and global view of history' Spectator

From the Author

Like his classic work, Seeds of Change, Henry Hobhouse's new book deals with the effect of plants on humans and their past. But this new book, Seeds of Wealth, tells the story of four plants that made men rich, and how these plants inadvertently changed the course of history.

The four crops Hobhouse has chosen are timber, the wine grape, rubber and tobacco. These four were not picked out of a hat, their cultivation and consumption has had a profound and enduring effect on the world in general and, specifically, on those who grew or traded their fruits.

As early as Shakespeare's time, timber became deficient in England; this shortage promoted the use of coal before any other country. Shallow coal being soon exhausted, this dearth led to the mining of deeper coal, which made essential the pumping of underground water, which in turn involved the use of steam power. this initiated the coal-steam-iron phase of the Industrial Revolution, fifty years earlier than in any other country. In the British North American colonies, in contrast, the entrepreneurial use of the colonies' great wood-wealth helped engender the revolution of rich men, which resulted in the War of Independence. As a consequence the new nation was, and remains, wealthier than European countries.

Given the right conditions, the wine grape flourishes as an alternative to grain. Ancient Greece and modern New Zealand, two economies 2,500 years apart, made the change-over very effective. Vineyards, ancient and modern, have produced many times the gross output of traditional staple wheat fields. Good wine, Hobhouse argues, makes people wealthy as well as mellow and wise. He deals with the story of wine grapes in a way that is original, provocative and full of new insights.

Rubber is an essential in many ways, used in planes, cars, bicycles, electricity, games and even condoms - all this from a Amazonian tree only 'discovered' after Columbus and only cultivated a century ago. Hobhouse traces the effects on the world economy of this most industrialized of plants, and describes rubber's integral part in the building of three countries, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. The synthetic rubber industry is also thoroughly explored, explaining how its one curious technical limitiation makes natural rubber still so fundamental.

Finally, there is tobacco, now very politically incorrect, but responsible for the affluence of Virginia, home of Founding Fathers. Virginia itself was only viable because of tobacco, the wealth of which created a colony that produced much of the wisdom that made Independence and, even more so, the Constitution feasible. The more recent tobacco story is less happy, one which cigarettes have dominated with known, sad consequences.

Seeds of Wealth offers proof of how the seemingly irrelevant can have widespread unintended consequences. In presenting global history from a perspective he has made his very own, Henry Hobhouse offers an overview of humans who have harnessed the nature of gain and how nature has unwittingly contributed to the creation of wealth and to economic growth.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1095 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Pan; New Ed edition (23 Aug. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0091DL4CA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #567,173 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plants, Wealth and History 23 Oct. 2004
By Peter Uys HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
This fascinating book looks at the causative role of plants in history. The cultivation of and trade in these plants created enormous wealth and changed the history of the world in many ways.
The chapter on timber is titled The Essential Carpet. In it, Hobhouse discusses how the shortage of timber in the United Kingdom led to the use of coal, which led to scientific advances and ultimately to the industrial revolution. On the other hand, the abundance of timber in the USA spurred the westward march of the country during the 1800s.
In The Grape's Bid For Immortality, the author discusses the growing of vines and making of wine from 600BC to the present. Wine has an enormous potential for the creation of wealth, multiplying nett profits wherever it is successful.
In the chapter Wheels Shod For Speed, he tells the story of rubber and how it changed the economies of Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and indeed the world. More Than A Smoke is a fascinating account of how the colony and ultimately state of Virginia owes it wealth to tobacco. Initially this area had a monopoly on tobacco by decree of the king of England. This industry created a landlord class, which amongst them counted certain signatories of the Declaration of Independence, like Washington and Jefferson.
The book is full of fascinating facts and observations, for example that the original alkaline tobacco might not be harmful and that the acidity of modern cigarettes might be the root cause of the harmful effects of smoking on health.
Seeds Of Wealth is a truly engrossing book as it deals with politics, economics, global history and more particularly Anglo-American relations, and the role of nature in creating wealth and economic growth. The text contains black and white illustrations and the book concludes with a bibliography and an index.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seeds of Wealth 29 July 2003
Format:Paperback
As a follow-up to his previous work, Henry Hobhouse has provided another unique and fascinating approach to historical interpretation in the latest fruit of his labor--Seeds of Wealth.
His chapters on timber and tobacco are providing seeds for thought for the Virginia Historical Society to consider doing a museum exhibition on the subject. One of the strengths of Hobhouse's work is his successful use of geography. We Americans have tended to overlook the good work of the historical geographers, while scholars in the UK, like Hobhouse, have taken advantage of their unique perspective of the past. His two works-- Seeds of Change and now Seeds of Wealth--are good examples of putting that discipline to its best use. It's too bad that Seeds of Wealth is not yet available for distribution here in the States.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Seeds of Wealth 29 July 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
As a follow-up to his previous work, Henry Hobhouse has provided another unique and fascinating approach to historical interpretation in the latest fruit of his labor--Seeds of Wealth.
His chapters on timber and tobacco are providing seeds for thought for the Virginia Historical Society to consider doing a museum exhibition on the subject. One of the strengths of Hobhouse's work is his successful use of geography. We Americans have tended to overlook the good work of the historical geographers, while scholars in the UK, like Hobhouse, have taken advantage of their unique perspective of the past. His two works-- Seeds of Change and now Seeds of Wealth--are good examples of putting that discipline to its best use. It's too bad that Seeds of Wealth is not yet available for distribution here in the States.
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