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Secret War TPB (Graphic Novel Pb) Paperback – 22 Nov 2006


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Paperback, 22 Nov 2006
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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics (22 Nov. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785113312
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785113317
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,179,553 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By M. I. Popovski on 7 July 2007
Format: Paperback
First of all get the art out of the way. This comic is beautiful. Moving on. It's hard not to see Secret War as some kind of allegory on Iraq. Nick Fury suspects the country of Latvaria is sponsoring super-villan terrorists in a plan to attack US civilians. But unlike the goings on in the real world, the White House refuses to do anything, so Fury goes it alone -- recruiting a rooster of superheroes to travel to Latvaria and show them who's boss. Hmmmm.

It's interesting to find such ideas in a Marvel comic, and Bendis should be applauded for his treatment of the subject, which I think is rather more subtle that the bombastic style of Mark Millar's political statements. The only place he fails is in the exploration of the villans' motivations -- ultimately the thing that is most important. The Latvarian hatred for America is largely unexplained. Fury simply retaliates against it, seeing the conflict in a black-and-white, us-against-them, heroes vs. villans way. This doesn't reflect the rather more complex real life 'war on terror'. But it suits the conventions of a Marvel superhero comic. It is also interesting that the rather simplistic comic book good vs. bad tone in Fury's speeches mirrors the neo-conservative rhetoric coming out of the White House. Again: hmmmm.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ghostgrey51 TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sometimes I think, no point in doing a review; everyone one before you has said all that has to be said, then other times the subject is of such a high standard that you just have to join in the acclamation.
I bought my copy of Secret Wars on the strength of the previous reviews and must tip my figurative hat to the previous reviewers for introducing me to what must rank as one of the top of Marvel's work; no mean feat. Bendis has written a storyline which compares with some of the classic spy novels of the recent years. There are no straight dividing lines between Good and Bad in this story, not Latveria, The White House or S.H.E.I.L.D; at the end of it I was still not sure if Latveria was the innocent party and Lucia Von Bardas was just originally acting on her country's behalf and in the end simply taking massive revenge. Or was Fury right? Heck, the only ones who were straight forward were the foot soldiers; Spider Man, Wolverine, Capt. America, Daredevil and Luke Cage on one side and the clutch of villains on the other. All pawns.
The narrative is a masterful combination of The Present, The Past and, The Recent, flipping from one to the other, keeping the reader on their toes, certainly taught me to pay attention to the left hand corner of a panel for the time reference!
Dell'otto artistry is brilliant, I appreciate the production of this sort of work takes a long time, but I wish there were many more of his painted style books out there. The dark and the shadowing sets the mood perfectly for this theme of duplicity and questionable actions as do those black and whites as Fury explains to the `mind wiped' heroes of the actions they have been drugged to forget.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. E. Rochester on 3 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Secret War was an interesting premise: Nick Fury (director of SHIELD) gathers a select team of superheroes, sent them on a covert mission to Latveria, then wipes their memory of the whole event. A year later, someone comes to take revenge.

However, the mission is kept so secret in this collection that you could blink and miss it. I wanted more details!
And the fact that a new hero was created just to finish the mission seemed a bit deus ex machina - young girl who can create big earthquakes...

Having said that, the artwork in this piece was really good, and the ending sets up Nick Fury's character as AWOL for several years to come in the Marvel comics series. His character and motivations were one of the better things about this series, and the bonus "Files of Nick Fury" at the back, as well as the interview pieces in between each issue, really add to the overall story.
One of the best scenes of this was when the heroes all share the same plane together and don't know what they're doing, featuring a drunk Logan/Wolverine, and people guessing who Peter Parker actually is.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
Brian Michael Bendis is one of those chaps whose work I've truly admired and respected. There's plenty of good reason why he's one of the best things about Marvel today. Look at his resume, and you'll get some real hits from the last decade, such as Ultimate Spider-Man/X-Men, The Pulse, New Avengers, House of M, Secret Invasion etc. The reason why he's so good should be as plain as day by now. His ability to write enthralling story arcs and express them with his brilliant, true-to-life, conversational dialogue.

Secret War is a graphic novel that, while nowhere near as major as stuff like Civil War or Secret Invasion, is a dark, artistic triumph, that looks at governmental conspiracies, manipulation of heroes, a new war against terrorism and a very fine line between law and chaos which becomes hopelessly blurred.

To get the most obvious question out of the way first; NO. This is NOT the classic Secret War crossover from the eighties where a who's who list of Marvel Heroes and Villains were whisked off to the Beyonder's planet to fight in an intergalactic war. Nor is it a sequel to said-crossover. This is an entirely different premise, one where the leading star is Colonel Nick Fury, the infamous head of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The legendary colonel with the infamous eye-patch and cigar unearths a startling truth. Latveria has been funding virtually ALL of the technological super villains in Marvel history, and Prime Minister Lucia Von Bardas has essentially an army of terrorists running wild to bring America down from within. And Fury is outraged when the White House refuses to oppose the Latverian government directly.

So what does Fury do?
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