My Secret Life in Hut Six and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£6.99
  • RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £3.00 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
My Secret Life in Hut Six... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.36
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

My Secret Life in Hut Six: One Woman's Experiences At Bletchley Park Paperback – 18 Jul 2014


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.99
£4.15 £4.53

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

My Secret Life in Hut Six: One Woman's Experiences At Bletchley Park + The Secret Life of Bletchley Park: The History of the Wartime Codebreaking Centre by the Men and Women Who Were There + The Debs of Bletchley Park and Other Stories
Price For All Three: £26.88

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.36
Trade in My Secret Life in Hut Six: One Woman's Experiences At Bletchley Park for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.36, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Lion Books; 1st New edition (18 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745956645
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745956640
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 29,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"I am fascinated by the way Bletchley Park's commitment to absolute secrecy exercised such a powerful and enduring hold over those who worked there - what a good thing that Mair Russell-Jones was persuaded to relax it a little, giving us this engaging account of life at the heart of one of Britain's most important World War Two operations.
I greatly enjoyed this book." --Edward Stourton, Broadcaster and author

About the Author

Mair Russell-Jones worked at Bletchley Park during the Second World War

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Anne TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This is one woman's story, as told to her son, of her wartime experiences. Mair was an ordinary worker at Bletchley Park decoding German messages using the Enigma code machines. You don't really get an understanding of exactly what she did from the descriptions here but it is obvious that Mair didn't really know what she was doing either. If you are looking for a full explanation of the coding work and its importance then this is not the book for you - this is one woman's history of her life and times and as such it is an excellent read.

Mair came from the Welsh valleys and had a place in this war work because of her knowledge of German. She had a rural background and an evangelical faith both of which affected her life significantly. The story of Mair's life up to her war work is interesting but as she reaches Bletchley Park it becomes fascinating. Mair's daily life and her war work is detailed in a narrative from her son and in excerpts from her memories - you really get a feeling for what it was like as a small and insignificant cog in a large and important wheel. After the war Mair kept the secret she had been told to and her life never revealed what she did until in her very last years when she felt that she finally had permission to share her long held secret.

This book is very revealing about Mair's life at the time and what it meant to her to be part of this work - it wasn't always good especially in relations with her family. We also have the opportunity to see the life of a Welsh woman of a strong faith at this time. This book is always interesting and Mair is an enjoyable companion. You won't understand more about what happened at Bletchley Park by reading this book but you will understand more about what it was like to be there.

I received a free copy of this book from the publishers via NetGalley.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the story of Mair Russell-Jones, whose son discovered had kept a secret about her wartime work for over fifty years. When asked what she had done during the war, Mair told everyone she had worked for the Foreign Office. Although this was not a lie, what she had actually done was far more – and far more important – than she was allowed to tell. For she had worked in Hut Six at Bletchley Park, deciphering codes on the Enigma machine and, in the words of Churchill, shortening the war by at least two years.

This is Mair’s story, from her childhood in Wales to her life after the war. Although simply and straight forwardly told, it is an important story and humbling to read. Mair, a committed Christian, first had her political feelings awoken when she spent time at a Missionary Training College in East London, when she was shocked by the battle in Cable Street with Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists and made aware by the vulnerability of the Jewish people who lived there. She was saddened by the poverty she found in the East End and her eyes were opened about why Jewish refugees were fleeing Europe. Later, after war was declared and a friend of hers was killed in the bombings, the war also became personal.

Mair was at University, studying music, German and history, when she was approached by a man who did not introduce himself, but suggested she apply for an unnamed post at an unnamed position at the Foreign Office. Intrigued, she found herself signing the Official Secrets Act (something she took extremely seriously throughout her life) and within a short time she had arrived at Bletchley. The work was often tedious, her accommodation initially unwelcoming and she worried about loose talk – but, gradually, things improved.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By xyzzy on 23 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm very interested in Bletchley Park and I have links with South Wales. Thus I was keen to read about the experiences of a young woman (Mair) from South Wales at Bletchley Park. The book is made up of reminiscences from Mair interleaved with a commentary from the other author which gives a context and continuity for the reminiscences. I enjoyed reading the book but I would have liked to see more detail of the work done by Mair in searching for "cribs" and I did think that some of the descriptions of what was going on at BP lacked detail.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Smith on 20 July 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book, telling the story of a woman working at Bletchley Park. It has unique anecdotes that more truly describe the life at Bletchley Park than someone would be prepared to do if they were talking publicly. It is charming and brutally honest. I found her attitude to life interesting. She certainly had a chip on her shoulder about being Welsh, but given some of the reactions she received that wasn't surprising. She was an evangelical Christian in the simplest meaning of the word evangelical and at times that can grate as it becomes clear that her Christianity overrides the simple truths of how you get on with people. There are a few minor errors in the facts from her son, who narrates the book, although less than you might expect of a non-expert working solely from the existing literature. But overall, as someone who has written extensively on Bletchley Park, I rate this very highly and among the books written about one single person who worked at Bletchley it is of the highest quality.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback