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The Secret Letters of the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari Paperback – 26 Nov 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Element (26 Nov. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007321112
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007321117
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 190,130 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robin Sharma, LL.B., LL.M., is one of the world's top experts on leadership and personal development, and CEO of Sharma Leadership International, Inc, a global training firm with a simple mission: to help people in organisations Lead Without Title.

Robin is also the author of eight major international bestsellers, which have been published in over 40 languages, including The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari and The Greatness Guide.


Product Description

Review

‘A captivating story that teaches as it delights.’
Paulo Coelho, author of The Alchemist

‘Robin Sharma’s books are helping people all around the world live great lives.’
Paulo Coelho

‘Nothing less than sensational. This book will bless your life.’
Mark Victor Hansen, co-author, Chicken Soup for the Soul

‘Robin Sharma has the rare gift of writing books that are truly life-changing.’
Richard Carlson, author of Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

About the Author

Robin Sharma, LL.B., LL.M., is one of the world's top experts on leadership and personal development, having helped millions of people to live their best lives. He is the author of 12 major international bestsellers, including The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari and The Greatness Guide. His work has been published in over 60 countries and in nearly 70 languages, making him one of the most widely read authors in the world.

Robin is CEO of Sharma Leadership International Inc., a coaching and training firm that counts Microsoft, Nike, IBM, GM and Panasonic among its clients. His website, robinsharma.com and blog robinsharma.com/blog are among the most popular personal success destinations on the internet.


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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Elliott TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Published in 1999 `The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' told the story of lawyer Julian Mantle confronting a spiritual crisis and discovering lessons for life. The book was a form of autobiography by its author Robin Sharma who himself trained as a lawyer and became founder of Sharma Leadership International, a global consultancy dedicated to developing people and organisations. He has written numerous best-sellers on themes of fulfilling potential and achieving happiness, (`Leadership Wisdom From The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari', `Discover Your Destiny With The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' etc.), and this latest book `The Secret Letters Of The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' follows on using a fable cum morality tale about Jonathan Landy, an out of touch relative of Julian Mantle who is tasked with travelling the world to collect life-saving letters within which are the secrets and talismen discovered by Julian.

Apparently Robin Sharma has sold millions of copies of his books in over 40 countries and his Sharma leadership enterprise is a huge commercial success, so to criticise may be presumptuous - but the `The Secret Letters Of The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' is a disjointed narrative that is short on logic with characters lacking depth and with stilted dialogue. It is difficult to argue against the intentions and implications of the `secrets', but these are largely sanctimonious sermons and little more than homilies. The talismen turn out to be mere attention grabbers and the worldwide zig-zag journeys were hatched to give Jonathan time to absorb the secrets. The spiritual/Buddhist approach is to be applauded but a more straightforward book on how to be true, embrace fears, choose influences, seek excellence etc. would be more genuine without enveloping these in a fanciful quest. `The Secret Letters Of The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' is clearly geared to Sharma's business as a behavioural/leadership consultant - it is a blatantly contrived commercial publication.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brett H TOP 50 REVIEWER on 31 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book uses a format which is hardly unique. That is it tells a story, almost a little morality tale, and blends in various universal truths or lessons. There is nothing which is new or unique in these 'revelations', but it is fair to say that it does not do any harm to remind ourselves of them once in a while.

The story revolves around a manager who has clearly lost his way in life and has lost his sense of what should be his priorities. He is sent on a mission around the globe to pick up nine different talismans from diverse places, each of which has a message attached to it. As a story, it is not the most riveting, but I have read worse. As a travelogue it is actually quite interesting in parts and the few places which I have visited are described in a way that I would consider authentic.

As previously mentioned there are no great revelations here and most of the message is common sense along the lines of relentless pursuit of material wealth does not bring happiness, confront your fears, make progress one step at a time etc. This is the fourth `monk who sold his ferrari' book and I imagine that whilst the first may have had an impact, the subsequent offerings have been a restatement, with slightly different presentation, of the same core material. Not having read the other volumes, this may be somewhat judgmental and rather cynical and I stand to be corrected by someone who has read them all.

This is not the first of this sort of book which I have read, and all in all I was a lot more enthusiastic about The Celestine Prophecy: An Adventure. However, clearly there is a demand for the Monk since, apparently over five million of them have been sold and I imagine that for certain people, if they read it at a particular stage in their lives, it could be quite pivotal in refocusing them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By stevieby on 29 July 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Capitalism has taken rather a knocking in the last few years, so not surprising someone is presenting an alternative. However, I find it a bit suspicious that this book triumphs the success of the author so much, and the suggestion that owning a Ferrari is a necessary prerequisite to telling the world how we should be living our lives!

I can only hope the author's international bestselling books are better than this one - if this was his sole output I'd doubt his reputation would be so stellar.

The story is wound around a pointless plot which sees the `hero' whizzing around the world on a series of flights punctuated by brief stops with `interesting' characters who each have some `wisdom' to impart.

These characters happen to live in some of the world's `must visit' places on earth - Paris, Istanbul, Kyoto, Barcelona, etc., turning the book into a kind of travelogue. All rather dazzling, but to visit all these places in a short space of time results in a superficial impression - surely not what the author was aiming for! Not to mention the environment. Not to mention the jet-lag.

I can't remember the messages picked up along the way, something about being yourself, take care of the people you love and be nice to everybody. I didn't find them original, challenging or live-changing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By HeavyMetalManitou VINE VOICE on 11 May 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
At its best points, 'The Secret Letters of the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari' reminded me of Paulo Coelho's 'The Alchemist', yet it lacked the unputdownability and tight plotting of Coelho's masterpiece. Nevertheless, Robin Sharma's book is enjoyable and contains a spiritual message which is - for a book with purported Buddhist leanings - ironically Christian in its anti-materialism. There's another irony in Sharma - a man with a multi-million-dollar empire - writing a tale that condemns material wealth. I'm not judging the man, though, only his book, which is readable and decently written, but not a compelling modern fable such as those told by Paulo Coelho and Salman Rushdie.

The book's not too shabby but if you want to read a tale with a powerful spiritual message, written by someone with a truly gargantuan bank balance, start with Coelho's writings.
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