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3.3 out of 5 stars
The Secret History of Lucifer (New Edition)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2015
The title is completely misleading. The book is actually about John the Baptist and how the author of the book believes he is the true head of the 'one world true religion'. The book repeats itself, as if the author believes the reader cannot remember what they have read five pages before. That can get more than a bit annoying after a chapter or two. Also, the incessant pushing of her other books every few pages and more 'reminders' of why it is 'so important' that you read (and of course buy) all of those as well to 'fully' get her picture of life is unnecessary and disruptive to the text.
Worst of all the book is very boring. There was one chapter that had something of interest in it but I had read a better account of it in another author's book anyway and she was merely rewording something she had got from other authors.
Also, parts of the book describe torture in detail, which adds nothing, but appears to be in the book to provoke emotions from the reader just to get you to agree with her anger with the Catholic Church. I have read other books that describe the history of what the Catholic Church have done over the years and they were much better, those books were reasoned while this one is just trying to push people's buttons. Lynn Picknett's angry tone pervades the book and reading pages of her angry rants is not interesting or informative and has an exhausting effect after a while of reading through them,
I have read several of Lynn Picknett's books and unfortunately they all seem to have one running theme about John the Baptist being the head of her own personal religion and her repeated attempts to convert everyone else to her ideas. Also, they all appear angry, repetitive and badly written. In hindsight it has been a waste of my time (and money) reading them actually.
There are so many other much better authors in this area so don't waste your time and money on this book.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2009
This book is a bit of an eye opener, don't even bother if you're a devout Christian or Jew as you won't like what you see, but it is very interesting. Only real detriment is how much the author self-references previous work.
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The author states "The early Christian church appropriated the name Lucifer to give to the archangel who supposedly was banished from heaven and it later became synonymous with darkness and the devil. I suspect there are many mistranslations of biblical/religious/historical material. Few people were able to read and write and many stories have been passed by word of mouth and corrupted over the years. Lucifer's name represented "Light Bringer. He has been referred elsewhere as an "Angel of Darkness" but this can also mean that he is so bright that he can penetrate the darkest realms and guide the hopeless souls into the light. Lynn Picknett cites many examples where the original description relating for example to Mary Magdalen and others has been altered and distorted, demeaning the role they played, Lynne is a remarkable and dedicated researcher and I applaud her authorship of this interesting (and illuminating) book.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 14 February 2011
"The Secret History of Lucifer" is an interesting enough book, but to be honest it didn't really tell me anything I didn't know before. Also the book was a little disjointed and incoherent at times which made me lose interest in it on occasions. Basically this feminist author believes that "Lucifer" does not equate with the Christian "Satan" and is a benevolent spiritual force which drives on intellectual curiosity and human progress. She traces the development of the idea of Lucifer/Satan/the Devil from the Biblical "Fall",noting how the pagan deities Pan and Venus were influential in creating the Christian Devil and how Goddess worship in general became stigmatised as Satanic by a tyrranical and patriarchal Christian church. The author is a Luciferian who thinks that this god of Light , Progress, Warmth and Intelligence is not the same as the epitome of Evil, Satan. Personally I think Lucifer/Satan are just the Devil's alter egos aimed at appealing to different types of people and creating the illusion of there being some sort of panoply of divine beings. That said the author does provide a good critique of Christianity pointing out it's many contradictions and excesses, such as the witch hunts and the Inquisition of the Middle Ages. This book is a good introduction to those who wish to have a broader knowledge of the alternative view of what kind of entity Lucifer is (if he exists) and how the notion of the Christian "Devil" came about.
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35 of 48 people found the following review helpful
on 5 April 2006
I have a few issues with this book, one being the disjointed and rambling nature of its discourse. The other is with the childlike and obvious bias related to the reader by the author. An example of this is the appearance and frequency of the word 'Unfortunately' in regard to anything to do with the Christian Church. (Used twice on the 4th page) poorly masking the anti Christian bias of the author.
I take the point that the author knows her market and writes in a style that would appeal. The problem for me is that her market is at the lowest common denominator.
Some areas are interesting and valid, but the style used by the author serves to undermine many of the assertions she makes. The writer appears as an excitable school child in a hurry to write down as many things as possible, repeatedly, resulting in a random 'hairball' of facts, fictions, opinions etc. The editor needs to re-assess.
Also, the title relating to clues within the 'real Da Vinci Code' is an obvious and needless marketing trick to plunder the rich pickings of the Dan Brown Zeitgeist.
The point of the title made early, that the author asserts that Lucifer is not Satan is fair enough. The rest is just churned out, regurgitated stuff we've seen before in a hundred other books, better written. The introduction makes the point; the rest of the book is fairly unrelated meanderings, some interesting, and some just dull or poorly explosive.
The book goes on to tempt (sic), the reader into believing that Jesus Christ was a murderer, a bisexual, never died on the cross and was a black magician. This may all be true, or not, however, the style and zeal the author employs in using every possible slander of Christ only served to turn me off. Was Christ really Satan? I dunno, and neither (despite herself) does the author.
Obvious, this book is a subjective rant. The author is seemingly incapable of drawing a reasoned and unbiased argument to woo the readers mind and believes that the blunt and subjective style is a better way to get her message across. There is a great sense of irony in that those she rails against the most; the Catholic Church and The Inquisition, used the same stylistic approach as the author of this book.
Summary:
The subjective and random style undermines the book and whilst there are some valid points made, the impact is lessened because the passionate/ teenager style of the author made me question whether any of the 'facts' are valid. This is another author on the Dan Brown bandwagon, just poorly written. Better reading is The Serpent Grail by Philip Gardiner.
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on 5 February 2015
A mixed bag. Some excellent stuff but feels a little 'padded out' with general info on the witch trials etc. Not entirely convinced by the Da Vinci stuff either. Nevertheless, an interesting introduction to the subject.
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Seems like hard work all the way. I bought it a long time ago and I'm still ploughing my way through it. Don't really care much if I finish it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 30 November 2012
Very interesting. I'm only halfway through at the moment but looking forward to the conclusion. What more can I say?
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on 31 December 2014
unusual reading, but vagually interesting. don't know that i'd recommend it though
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on 21 March 2015
Delivery good, condition good and contents excellent!
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