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Secret Beyond the Door DVD

19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Joan Bennett, Michael Redgrave, Anne Revere, Barbara O'Neil
  • Directors: Fritz Lang
  • Format: Dolby, PAL
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Exposure Cinema
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Nov. 2011
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005IXEA6Y
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,690 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

When Celia (Joan Bennett, Scarlet Street ) marries architect Mark Lamphere (Michael Redgrave, The Lady Vanishes ) after a whirlwind romance, life seems blissful - but all is not as it appears. Her husband's mansion contains re-creations of rooms in which infamous murders took place and his previous wife died in strange circumstances. Is the young bride's imagination overactive, or do the opulent walls hide a sinister secret - and why is one room always kept locked?

Fritz Lang's atmospheric romantic thriller is now available for the first time in a definitive, remastered edition featuring a collector's booklet with film notes and specially-commissioned articles, an extensive stills and poster gallery and rare on-set photographs.

Includes English subtitles for the hard of hearing.

Region 0 PAL.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By James Colley on 22 Nov. 2011
Format: DVD
This is a welcome DVD release for a fine movie from Fritz Lang. There are dark themes and suspenseful moods in common with Rebecca and Suspicion in this psychological thriller about a wealthy young woman (played by Joan Bennett) who goes on vacation and, seemingly on impulse, falls for a charming but mercurial architect (Michael Redgrave) and marries him before she even really knows anything of substance about him. Predictably, after a brief period of happiness, her husband begins to act strangely, and, as she anxiously tries to discover the reasons for his sudden cold aloofness, she finds that he has been married before. As she tries to make sense of such a shock, one more unnerving revelation after another (not least her husband's bizarre collection of murder-themed rooms that he keeps in his basement) shakes her sense of security, and then there is the lingering mystery of what lies beyond the room whose door remains locked in his mansion. Without giving anything else away, I can say that this is a riveting story, well-paced and expertly played and directed, with breathtaking use of light and shadow to summon up certain moods and moments. The print is really bright and clean, the sound is excellent and the experience as a whole is very enjoyable indeed. Highly recommended.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Alex da Silva on 25 May 2009
Format: VHS Tape
This film sees Mark (Michael Redgrave) with a pychological problem. There are a few things wrong in his head, eg, he collects rooms where murders have been committed. He lays these rooms out exactly as they were, with original artifacts, at the time the murders were committed and devotes a wing of his house to them. When Celia (Joan Bennett) marries him, she only discovers his passion when a rain storm ruins the outside house-warming party they are giving, and he brings the guests indoors for a tour of the house.

What lies in room no.7? It is permanently locked and becomes Celia's object of curiosity. Also in the house are 3 slightly spooky other characters - Redgrave's sister Caroline (Anne Revere), his son David (Mark Dennis) from a previous marriage and his secretary Miss Robey (Barbara O'Neil). Its a good film, but I think if I was a woman I would have left him pretty early on in the relationship!

While I could see where the film was heading, the actual ending is not what I expected. It's a spookily filmed story and it's quite memorable.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Raskolnikov on 30 Nov. 2011
Format: DVD
This new edition by Exposure Cinema is a little treasure. The DVD transfer is very clean, with good contrast and a very pleasant overall image quality. It comes with an illustrated booklet containing three brief but interesting essays about the movie and its director. This is a title that Lang fans have waited forever to get. Kudos to the company for showing great care and issuing a top-quality product!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By The CinemaScope Cat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 Jan. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A New York socialite (Joan Bennett) falls in love with and marries a man (Michael Redgrave) in Mexico that she's only known for a few days. But it doesn't take long for her to realize he has some deep rooted psychological problems. This noir-ish Freudian thriller (with ties to the Bluebeard story) benefits greatly from Fritz Lang's stimulating direction and Stanley Cortez's (MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS) atmospheric black and white lensing. Lang maintains an intense, almost claustrophobic mood and with Redgrave's off kilter performance, it's enough to propel the mystery forward. But if Lang doesn't quite cop out at the end like Hitchcock's SUSPICION or Siodmak's STRANGE AFFAIR OF UNCLE HARRY, the last fifteen minutes are pretty wobbly and disappointing. This was Bennett's fifth and final film with Lang and as she proved in her prior four films with him, she did her best work for him. If her distressed heroine isn't as good as the sluts she played in Lang's SCARLET STREET or WOMAN IN THE WINDOW, it's just not as interesting a character. Music by Miklos Rozsa. With Anne Revere, Natalie Schafer, Barbara O'Neil and James Seay.

The Exposure Cinema DVD via Great Britain is a very nicely rendered B&W transfer in its appropriate 1.33 ratio.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Aug. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Secret Beyond the Door is directed by Fritz Lang and adapted to screenplay by Silvia Richards from a story by Rufus King. It stars Joan Bennett, Michael Redgrave, Anne Revere, Barbara O'Neil and Natalie Schafer. Music is by Miklós Rózsa and cinematography by Stanley Cortez.

After a whirlwind romance, Celia Barrett (Bennett) marries Mark Lamphere (Redgrave) but finds once the honeymoon is over his behaviour becomes quite odd...

A troubled production and troubling reactions to it by the critics and Lang himself! Secret Beyond the Door is very much in the divisive half of Lang's filmic output. Taking its lead from classic era Hollywood's keen interest with all things Freudian, and doffing its cap towards a number of "women in peril at home" films of the 1940s, it's a picture that's hardly original. Yet in spite of some weaknesses in the screenplay that revolve around the psychological troubles of Mark Lamphere, this is still a fascinating and suspenseful picture.

I married a stranger.

Draped in Gothic overtones and astonishingly beautiful into the bargain, it's unmistakably a Lang film. His ire towards the cast and studio, where he was usurped in the cutting room and with choice of cinematographer, led Lang to be very dismissive towards the piece. However, it contains all that's good about the great director. Scenes such as the opening involving a paper boat on ripples of water, or a sequence that sees Mark dream he is in a courtroom full of faceless jurors, these are indelible images. Then there's the lighting techniques used around the moody Lamphere mansion that are simply stunning, with Cortez (The Night of the Hunter) photographing with atmospheric clarity.

Blades Creek, Levender Falls.
Read more ›
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