Buy Used
£2.62
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Only lightly used. Book has minimal wear to cover and binding. A few pages may have small creases and minimal underlining. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Second Stage Lensmen (History of Civilization) Paperback – 1 Jul 2006


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£66.00
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.80 £2.62


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Old Earth Books (1 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1882968131
  • ISBN-13: 978-1882968138
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 12.8 x 2.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,886,172 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Publisher

The Old Earth Books reprints of the 6 volume Lensman series is a trade paperback facsimile of the orginal Fantasy Press hardcovers. Covers, interior art, and text are reproduced from actual copies of the original books.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Mar. 1998
Format: Paperback
Possibly the best in the Series, though anyone would tell you, that is a difficult determination to make. The 5 most powerful "Second Stage" Lensmen do detective, spy and combat duty to ferret out and destroy the denizens of Boskone. The beams are hotter, the technology heavier, the battles bigger and the mental powers greater than ever before. See the sunbeam roast planets! This book is loaded with everything good about the Lensmen series. My favorite chapter is "Nadreck at Work", about a non oxygen breathing, Second Stage Lensman with a decidedly, uh, er, different moral outlook on things. Clarissa Kinnison, Kim's wife, comes into her own as a woman hero to make this series accessible to women also.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Magnussen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback
I (and many others) believe the best place to start with Doc Smith's "Lensman" series is Galactic Patrol; and as I've said why, at length, in my review of that opus, I won't repeat it here.

Furthermore, if you've already read "Patrol" and Gray Lensman with enjoyment, you'll hardly need my urging to continue.

This is nonetheless probably the weakest of the four main Lensman novels, mainly because of Smith's often-noted discomfort with female characters. It is a curious reflection on his powers as a writer that he can make a thoroughly convincing — even likeable! — character of a thirty-foot, crocodile-headed, winged python with eyes that come out on stalks, but can't manage the matriarch of a tribe of human Amazons (from the planet Lyrane II).

We cannot, to be sure, be surprised that Kinnison's skills at handling females are so deficient: after all, he's spent his formative years galumphing around the Galaxy in search of the arch-villain Helmuth, not hanging out like a normal teenager. Military genius he may be, but socially he's still an adolescent.

(Although... perhaps he's not *quite* as inexperienced as all that? Exactly what *were* his experiences as a Cadet with that "bedroom-eyed Aldebaranian hell-cat", the stunningly beautiful Dessa Desplaines? Whatever they were, they obviously left quite an impression: Kinnison — normally unflappable even by outré developments like hyperspatial tubes materialising in the same room with him — is reduced to a jelly at the mere thought of meeting her again.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback
I was first introduced when I watched the Lensman anime (of which there are two, everything is the same except that they arent sequels and the stories contradict each other) on Sky Movies back when I was at school. In my fourth year I did a weeks work experience in Oxfam (better than building walls up Rivington) and in the book rack I found Triplanetary. I read the cover and realised it was part of the Lensman series and wondered if it was the same Lensman as the anime. Unfortunately, I didn't read the book until I was at college when I found out that one of my mates owned the entire series. Many conversations about "lets strip down this engine and improve it" and "I've just had an idea, if we connect this lead to that, and that lead to this, we have built a sun beam!"
Anyway, back to this book. Thoroughly enjoyable read but not worth getting unless you have or are getting the entire series.
I have just looked on imdb and there is a Japanese movie Lensman : Power of the Lens.
Neeeeed!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
The 5 "Second Stage" Lensmen (and Lenswoman) at Work! 22 Mar. 1998
By walth@netcom.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Possibly the best in the Series, though anyone would tell you, that is a difficult determination to make. The 5 most powerful "Second Stage" Lensmen do detective, spy and combat duty to ferret out and destroy the denizens of Boskone. The beams are hotter, the technology heavier, the battles bigger and the mental powers greater than ever before. See the sunbeam roast planets! This book is loaded with everything good about the Lensmen series. My favorite chapter is "Nadreck at Work", about a non oxygen breathing, Second Stage Lensman with a decidedly, uh, er, different moral outlook on things. Clarissa Kinnison, Kim's wife, comes into her own as a woman hero to make this series accessible to women also.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Best of Kimball Kinnison 5 Aug. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Finally the book I have been waiting for since 1982. I first read this book in the 1970's, and read it at least 50-60 times. However, it was lost while moving in 1982 and I have been searching avidly for it ever since. In this book, Kimball Kinnison does some of his best work as a lensman. However then best part about this book is we get to see the work of other lensman, as well as of the galactic patrol itself. In this we see that much of what makes people great are the people they associate with; a lesson of great value today. This is perhaps the inspiration for many of today's ensemble cast shows. An excellent read by one of the worlds greatest storytellers.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
By Noshabkeming, it's still a great yarn! 21 Jun. 2000
By Joel Simon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you ever wonder how much American society has changed since the early '50's, just a little of Smith's dialogue will set you up with everything you need to know.
"'Listen, angel-face!' the man commanded. 'You're as mad as a radeligian cateagle - you're as cockeyed as Trenco's ether. Get this, and get it straight. To any really intelligent being of any one of forty million planets, your whole Lyranian race would be a total loss with no insurance. You're a God-forsaken, spiritually and emotionally starved, barren, mentally ossified, and completely monstrous mess. If I, personally, never see either you or your planet again, that will be exactly twenty seven minutes too soon. If anybody else ever hears of Lyrane and thinks he wants to visit it, I'll take him out of - I'll knock a hip down on him if I have to, to keep him away from here. Do I make myself clear?'"
And that's the ur-goodguy addressing the head of state of a neutral planet. Golly.
The science is ludicrous, the politics militaristic and jingoistic in the extreme. I never can keep all the trenchant, searing, biting space battles of brain-straining refractoriness straight. The dialogue often makes me laugh out loud, and the gender and (to the extent they appear at all) race relations make me squirm in my chair. So why is all this still so readable?
I guess it's for the same reason the old Conan stories by Robert E. Howard (a much inferior writer to Smith) are still among my favorites: STORY. Once you get past all the back-story in Triplanetary, the narrative just grabs you by the collar and doesn't let you go until Kit Kinnison sends out his message in a bottle in the epilogue of the final volume. If I had back all the hours of sleep I've traded for late night sessions with "Doc" Smith, I wouldn't wake up for months.
And by the nine purple hells of Palain, isn't that what escapist reading is for?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
By Noshabkeming, it's still a great yarn! 21 Jun. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you ever wonder how much American society has changed since the early '50's, just a little of Smith's dialogue will set you up with everything you need to know.
"'Listen, angel-face!' the man commanded. 'You're as mad as a radeligian cateagle - you're as cockeyed as Trenco's ether. Get this, and get it straight. To any really intelligent being of any one of forty million planets, your whole Lyranian race would be a total loss with no insurance. You're a God-forsaken, spiritually and emotionally starved, barren, mentally ossified, and completely monstrous mess. If I, personaly, never see either you or your planet again, that will be exactly twenty seven minutes too soon. If anybody else ever hears of Lyrane and thinks he wants to visit it, I'll take him out of - I'll knock a hip down on him if I have to, to keep him away from here. Do I make myself clear?'"
And that's the ur-goodguy addressing the head of state of a neutral planet. Golly.
The science is ludicrous, the politics militaristic and jingoistic in the extreme. I never can keep all the trenchant, searing, biting space battles of brain-straining refractoriness straight. The dialogue often makes me laugh out loud, and the gender and (to the extent they appear at all) race relations make me squirm in my chair. So why is all this still so readable?
I guess it's for the same reason the old Conan stories by Robert E. Howard (a much inferior writer to Smith) are still among my favorites: STORY. Once you get past all the back-story in Triplanetary, the narrative just grabs you by the collar and doesn't let you go until Kit Kinnison sends out his message in a bottle in the epilogue of the final volume. If I had back all the hours of sleep I've traded for late night sessions with "Doc" Smith, I wouldn't wake up for months.
And by the nine purple hells of Palain, isn't that what escapist reading is for?
Strap a giant engine onto your planet and let's go! 9 Feb. 2010
By Michael Battaglia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you've read this far you know the formula by now . . . having defeated Boskone, Our Heroes discover that a bigger and more shadowy Boskone exists and now they have to go to great lengths to stop it. They win in the end, of course, because they are Heroes. After spending now nearly four books with Kim Kinnison, it's clear that while he's not the deepest character in the world when it comes to development and pretty much everything in the world comes easily to him (which it kinds of needs to, with the perils that he faces), it's also evident that he's a lot of fun, stalwart and brutal in equal measure. He even gets to fall in love here finally, to his perfect match, the equally feisty Nurse MacDougall.

So on one hand this volume winds up being more of the same, and yet not. It doesn't quite reach the dizzying heights of insanity that the last volume managed but Smith is so good at keeping the plot moving and throwing out newly inventive planets and dangers for the heroes to best that it seems scarily effective. What makes this volume fascinating is the cast of characters that Kinnison has to work with and winds up encountering, from the planet made entirely of women and the other Lensmen such as Nadreck, who does manage to seem utterly alien and eerily effective in his cowardice.

The wide variety helps offset the often, shall we say, old fashioned tone of things, and there's a certain swaggering sense of confidence to this, with Kinnison managing to make seemingly impossible tasks like infiltrating societies as a fence and climbing his way up the crooked ladder of criminal organization seem both easy and something only he could do. Reading this, it's impressive how many concepts were later picked up, not only by other Space Opera writers but SF writers in general. The Lensmen, in their alien varieties, are almost direct forerunners of DC Comics' Green Lantern Corps and Nadreck seems like the ancestor of Larry Niven's Puppeteer race of aliens in the Ringworld novels.

It's hard to convey in mere words how fast the story moves once it gets going and unless you're totally allergic to Golden Age SF, can be read as a breakneck adventure novel. Smith's prose, while not fancy, has an exuberance that suggests every sentence should come with an exclamation point and the can-do attitude coupled with a realistic sense of the stakes involved helps the affair feel grounded even when you're talking to weird tentacled people on mobile planets. He even manages to make an outer space battle feel exciting on paper when described from the outside, something that wouldn't happen on a visual level until something called Star Wars came along.

Sure, there's quibbles. Mentor of the Arisians can't seem to decide whether he wants to be involved in saving the universe or not and basically just shows up when people are stuck to get them through, a deus ex machina if I've ever seen one. Boskone doesn't seem quite as clever this time out, coming to the wrong conclusion several times, making Kinnison's ultimate victory seem that much more ordained.

But the mixture of humans and aliens working together, the sense of making aliens feel alien without going all Stanislaw Lem on us, the widescreen action in a constantly churning plot, where even the detours have a sense of urgency to them, is matched by little else in SF before or since. There may be more sophisticated works in this vein, more inventive, and more action-packed, but very few are so consistently entertaining as this.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback